Gifted people are similar to autistics?

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EXPECIALLY
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04 Feb 2012, 12:21 am

dr01dguy wrote:
Er, sorry, but I'm rather boring in that regard. I might fantasize about trains more often than I think about sex, but I'm sufficiently-grounded in reality to know that nothing like this is ever going to get built unless someone in Washington decide to shamelessly buy Florida's votes in the next election by giving us a really nice $12 billion Christmas present. :(


:)

I think the autistics who are less prone to being in their own universe are more likely to achieve something great.

It's a total crapshoot, really, but I don't have the intense drive that you see in inventors and other pioneers of science, math, or philosophy. Sometimes folks like me who live in their mind most of the time stumble upon great achievement if they are truly gifted, but I'm not gifted in any specific area.

I'm not an invalid, though. I'm getting my Bachelor's in programming now, I'm certainly no prodigy but I know it's something I enjoy have the traits to succeed in.


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04 Feb 2012, 12:42 am

EXPECIALLY wrote:
IQ tests were developed by the US Army to assess the abilities and intelligence of soldiers, how they became the standard is beyond me.


IQ tests were developed in the late 1800s to identify intellectual disability, not by the US Army. The Army may use or have developed IQ tests, but they didn't invent the idea.



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04 Feb 2012, 10:21 am

Verdandi wrote:
EXPECIALLY wrote:
IQ tests were developed by the US Army to assess the abilities and intelligence of soldiers, how they became the standard is beyond me.


IQ tests were developed in the late 1800s to identify intellectual disability, not by the US Army. The Army may use or have developed IQ tests, but they didn't invent the idea.


I looked it up and you're right, it was SAT(developed for the army).

But I hope you don't mean for use at Ellis Island?

I think that started later anyway, but they had all sorts of horrid testing for the immigrants so they could sort them into different categories and deny many entrance into the use, the terms "moron" and "imbecile" were created by doctors at Ellis Island around that time, many Eastern European people were put into these groups for no good reason.

Regardless, you'd have to score extremely low on the IQ test to be considered a moron or an imbecile today but I don't think it fairly measures IQ, especially for people on the spectrum.

I know someone on the spectrum with an IQ of 77. She works in a highly regarded field and is quite verbose, in written word, anyway.

She says she has a low level of emotional maturity and that this is why her score is so low, but I've seen autistics with an IQ of 155 that I would gauge to be at around the same emotional maturity level.


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04 Feb 2012, 3:52 pm

I wouldn't say non autistic gifted people are similar at all as they wouldn't have difficulty with social skills as its natural for them even though they take a lot of pride of their talents.



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04 Feb 2012, 8:24 pm

EXPECIALLY wrote:

I looked it up and you're right, it was SAT(developed for the army).

But I hope you don't mean for use at Ellis Island?

I think that started later anyway, but they had all sorts of horrid testing for the immigrants so they could sort them into different categories and deny many entrance into the use, the terms "moron" and "imbecile" were created by doctors at Ellis Island around that time, many Eastern European people were put into these groups for no good reason.


Anbuend found a description of "imbecile" from the early 1900s that seems to describe autism, actually.

Quote:
Regardless, you'd have to score extremely low on the IQ test to be considered a moron or an imbecile today but I don't think it fairly measures IQ, especially for people on the spectrum.

I know someone on the spectrum with an IQ of 77. She works in a highly regarded field and is quite verbose, in written word, anyway.

She says she has a low level of emotional maturity and that this is why her score is so low, but I've seen autistics with an IQ of 155 that I would gauge to be at around the same emotional maturity level.


I know of autistic people with IQ scores all over the place. It doesn't accurately predict their ability to function in the real world. Someone can get a low score and go on to get a doctorate. Someone else can get a high score and barely be able to function.



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04 Feb 2012, 9:28 pm

Verdandi wrote:
EXPECIALLY wrote:

I looked it up and you're right, it was SAT(developed for the army).

But I hope you don't mean for use at Ellis Island?

I think that started later anyway, but they had all sorts of horrid testing for the immigrants so they could sort them into different categories and deny many entrance into the use, the terms "moron" and "imbecile" were created by doctors at Ellis Island around that time, many Eastern European people were put into these groups for no good reason.


Anbuend found a description of "imbecile" from the early 1900s that seems to describe autism, actually.

Quote:
Regardless, you'd have to score extremely low on the IQ test to be considered a moron or an imbecile today but I don't think it fairly measures IQ, especially for people on the spectrum.

I know someone on the spectrum with an IQ of 77. She works in a highly regarded field and is quite verbose, in written word, anyway.

She says she has a low level of emotional maturity and that this is why her score is so low, but I've seen autistics with an IQ of 155 that I would gauge to be at around the same emotional maturity level.


I know of autistic people with IQ scores all over the place. It doesn't accurately predict their ability to function in the real world. Someone can get a low score and go on to get a doctorate. Someone else can get a high score and barely be able to function.


You're saying exactly what I said.

I was saying that both people were considered gifted, nothing about functioning level.


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04 Feb 2012, 9:40 pm

EXPECIALLY wrote:

You're saying exactly what I said.

I was saying that both people were considered gifted, nothing about functioning level.


That's because I was agreeing with you, and I thought I was providing another detail to the discussion.