A genetic disease of the malabsorption of gluten and starch?

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Ilan
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30 May 2012, 4:15 pm

Let me know if it works on you, results are amazing on me.
We knew that gluten was a problem, It seems that starch was another.
I've been tested negatively for main allergies, I don’t have celiac disease.

The first thing to do is to delete gluten of the alimentation because it gives the bigger troubles.
wheat, barley, oats, rye and… milk (due to contamination ?)
Then I advise to reduce as far as possible the proportion of starch in the alimentation.
Some approximated figures to help you, percentage of starch:
Poaceae: Corn (72%), wheat (70%), sorghum (65%), rye (60%), barley (52.2%), oat (36%), rice (28%)
Peas (50-80%), Fresh pasta with egg (47%), ordinary bread (48.9%), Potato (70%)
Now some goods: cultivated lentil (16%), chestnut (6%), peanut (5.9%), chocolate (4.7%), roasted cashews, banana (3.8%), carrot (1.4%), quinoa, soybean
Near 0 or 0% : nuts, roasted pistachios (1.37%), fig, Almond, cherry, apple, Melon, pumpkin, cabbage
(figures are not at all reliable, it’s just a first view)

I listed some effects of the oats in that post : http://www.wrongplanet.net/postt197012.html



Aharon
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30 May 2012, 4:26 pm

I've been wheat free in an effort to reduce my gluten intact to trace amounts, and I feel much sharper, clearer, less lethargic. My cravings for starchy foods has also declined immensely. I still eat corn, rice, and oats in limited amounts.


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Callista
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30 May 2012, 4:44 pm

I've been on a gluten-free, milk-free diet, thanks to my mom. Those were some of the worst years of my life. I always felt hungry. I think I was malnourished, because after I left home at the age of 17, I grew four inches. Seventeen-year-olds are supposed to have finished growing.


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Atomsk
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30 May 2012, 4:52 pm

Callista wrote:
I've been on a gluten-free, milk-free diet, thanks to my mom. Those were some of the worst years of my life. I always felt hungry. I think I was malnourished, because after I left home at the age of 17, I grew four inches. Seventeen-year-olds are supposed to have finished growing.


I grew a couple more inches when I was 18, no malnourishment going on though.

I did try a gluten-free, milk-free diet when I was 20... didn't improve anything, just made me want to eat normally again - I definitely disliked it.



pokerface
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30 May 2012, 4:54 pm

What are the symptoms of gluten intolerance?



Wandering_Stranger
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30 May 2012, 5:19 pm

I've been on a wheat and milk free diet before. How bloody boring. :(

Am meant to be on a wheat free diet; but struggle with it. Not helped when I go away for the weekend.



bnky
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30 May 2012, 6:01 pm

Callista wrote:
Seventeen-year-olds are supposed to have finished growing.

Hah! No - I grew an inch at 39... Then again that was after I moved a LOT closer to a pole. Anyone else had this happen?



kate123A
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30 May 2012, 6:24 pm

my son was on the gluten free diet and is free of all his food allergies. We took gluten out because he was very sick pooping 12 times a day and vomiting a lot. His pediatrician said all children do that and his poop was white to this day I think she had her head shoved where the sun doesn't shine and got her medical degree from a cracker jack box. So I took gluten out and kept it out. He is doing better now we eliminated his 13 food allergies(CDC tested). I carefully added gluten back into his diet.

He has an impacted bowel at this point but we are working to fix that.

I honestly think he outgrew the gluten intolerance and for that I'm very thankful. We are currently on a low protein diet because it was stressing his kidneys and he had protein in his urine. I'm hoping he outgrows the food allergies and I can put him on a normal diet in the Fall.



ocdgirl123
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30 May 2012, 7:28 pm

I found the gluten free diet made it worse!

However, a high-protein diet (what I mean by that is more than recommended by the food guide) seems to make me autistic.


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Callista
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30 May 2012, 7:44 pm

pokerface wrote:
What are the symptoms of gluten intolerance?
Your body thinks gluten is an invader, so it attacks your intestine when you eat gluten. As a result, your intestine can't absorb nutrients. You lose huge amounts of weight, have digestive problems, and get the symptoms of vitamin and mineral deficiencies. It has been mistaken for anorexia in severe cases. When my mom was diagnosed, she weighed only 95 pounds, and she was eating more than people twice her size. Now she's back up to a healthy 130, on a gluten-free diet.

It's possible to be normal weight or even overweight and have celiac disease, but that usually only applies to milder cases. Those can be harder to detect, and masquerade as irritable bowel syndrome that vanishes when you stop eating gluten. A lot of the new cases are milder cases that have been diagnosed as celiac disease became more well known and doctors started realizing that some of the unexplained digestive disorders they saw might be related to celiac disease.

A wheat allergy is different from celiac disease. If you have a wheat allergy, you get all the usual allergy symptoms--you know, hives, hay fever, even asthma attacks--when you eat wheat or inhale flour dust or in severe cases even touch wheat. It's got little to do with your intestine.

If you're autistic and you have any of those problems, naturally it's important to treat them, to change your diet if you have to, in order to be healthier. Your brain runs best when it's part of a healthy body. For some people, that means treating celiac disease. For others--like me--it actually means eating more whole grains, milk, eggs, fruits/vegetables, and similar nutritious stuff.

I don't know why I grew four inches after I moved out of my mom's place and got away from her ultra-strict diet--I actually moved farther south when I did. I only know that when I left home I was five feet and an inch, and now I'm 5'5". My medical records show it, too. It's rather odd, but I'm not too surprised because when I left home I got filling meals for the first time in my life, as well as access to milk, more meat than before, bread and pasta, etc. My mom has always believed--probably without knowing it--that if you ate exactly the right way, you would never die. So she spends a lot of her time planning meals and researching nutrition. It's almost like an eating disorder. She kind of got lucky that she was diagnosed with something that could be entirely treated with diet. If it had been something that required medication, she would have rejected the doctors' advice, tried to treat it with herbs, and probably not survived.


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30 May 2012, 9:46 pm

bnky wrote:
Callista wrote:
Seventeen-year-olds are supposed to have finished growing.

Hah! No - I grew an inch at 39... Then again that was after I moved a LOT closer to a pole. Anyone else had this happen?

Your height vary by up to a couple of centimeters depending on how long it is since you woke up / got out of bed. During the day your vertebra gets shorter due to gravity. That might be the reason. :)


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30 May 2012, 10:22 pm

I don't think it has a link to autism.


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The-Raven
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31 May 2012, 2:00 am

I found cutting out gluten changed my life really much, later when i was researching into my arthritus i found stuff about starch and have found cutting out starch has change my life even more, getting rid of my arthritus, IBS, and making me feel much more well.

these books are great!! !

http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-IBS-Low-Sta ... 314&sr=8-1

http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-IBS-Starch- ... 314&sr=8-6

her website

http://www.lowstarchdiet.net/index.html



Mummy_of_Peanut
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31 May 2012, 5:40 am

My daughter and I are on a mainly dairy free diet. When she has a moderate amount of milk, her ADHD like symptoms emerge. Without the dairy, she still has ASD traits. It's just the hyperactivity/concentration/mood that's affected. As for myself, it's my gut that tells me that I need to ease up on the dairy. I haven't tried gluten free on her. I have, on myself, when I did a candida diet years ago, and I've never felt better than I did then. I just don't have the will power to continue, without a doc telling me I have to.


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31 May 2012, 6:12 am

I think we once again can conclude that we're all individuals and that no diet will ever change that, we have plenty of threads about this, so Search and ye shall find that all have been said about this already. ;)


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Ilan
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31 May 2012, 1:56 pm

some more precise figures:
(percentage of starch)

cooked:
Rice 28.7%
white rice 26.9%
Potato 17.2%
Lens 16.2%
Green beans 2%
Celeriac 0.6%
Zucchini, skin and pulp 0.1%

canned:
Chestnut puree 18%
Chickpea 15.8%
White bean 14.7%
corn 13.7%
Lens 10.2%
flageolet 8.6%
peas 5.5%
Green beans 2.2%
Carrot 0.5%

Grilled, roasted or dried:
Chestnuts, roasted 32%
Cashews, salted 14.2%
Prunes, dried, uncooked 5.11%
Pistachio, roasted, salted 3.6%
Peanuts, roasted, salted 3.3%
Raisins 2.7%
Fig, dried 1.9%
Nuts, dried kernels 1.5%
Almonds, dry roasted, unblanched 0.71%
Apricot, dried, pitted 0.1%

raw:
Chestnuts, boiled 22.8%
Banana 5.38%
Baked bean 6.2%
Dark chocolate, extra, tasting, 70% cocoa minimum shelf 5.3%
Dark chocolate 40% cocoa minimum, to make pastries or chewable 4.7%
Almond 1.6%
Hazel 1.4%
Brazil nuts 0.483%
Pecans 0.46%
Leek 0.3%
apple 0.05%
Strawberry 0.04%
Tomato 0.03%
Melon 0.015%