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Candles15
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07 Jun 2012, 4:51 pm

I've only been diagnosed with BPD recently but I'm still getting therapy which I see as pointless. SO tomorrow I going to moan until my psychologist refer me to a psychiatrist. I've been having on and off depression since I was 13 and it doesn't seem to get better with time at all. In fact, I feel it has gotten worse as I got older.

Does anyone know why mental health services are so reluctant to prescribe medicine as well?



Last edited by Candles15 on 07 Jun 2012, 5:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

redrobin62
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07 Jun 2012, 4:57 pm

Hmm...I can't speak for the U.K., but here in America they sure do love to medicate people. Seems like they can't wait to get you on Prozac or Lithium or Elavil or, in my case, Risperdal. The health clinics here do have MD's so they can prescribe, not psychologists. If you go to a clinic in your area with an MD they'll prescribe something.



Candles15
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07 Jun 2012, 5:05 pm

redrobin62 wrote:
Hmm...I can't speak for the U.K., but here in America they sure do love to medicate people. Seems like they can't wait to get you on Prozac or Lithium or Elavil or, in my case, Risperdal. The health clinics here do have MD's so they can prescribe, not psychologists. If you go to a clinic in your area with an MD they'll prescribe something.


Ah, that's not fair! :( I've been bad enough that they felt the need to have me supervised 24/7 but they're so reluctant to prescribe me medicine. I'm thinking maybe it's because I'm still in my teens..



redrobin62
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07 Jun 2012, 5:12 pm

Can psychologists in the U.K. prescribe meds?



Last edited by redrobin62 on 07 Jun 2012, 5:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Candles15
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07 Jun 2012, 5:19 pm

redrobin62 wrote:
Can psycholgists in the U.K. prescribe meds?


No, I don't think so. I think they have to refer you to a psychiatrist for that..



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07 Jun 2012, 6:21 pm

everyone I have ever known in UK with depression or anxiety or psychosis has been prescribed drugs at the drop of a hat. Far too easily because they dont work for everyone.

Some folk do really well on them, just the job, others they really don't suit, but they are prescribed like smarties as if they will work for everyone.

ask them why they havent considered anti-depressants for you?



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07 Jun 2012, 6:39 pm

There are several reasons why they might be reluctant to prescribe meds.

1. Cost. In the UK you have the NHS. This means that your health service is paid for by the tax payers, through the gov. The gov has gazillion regulations and zillions of pages of paperwork that medical service providers must wade through and fill out to meet the gov requirements, to be allowed to provide what ever service/treatment the provider is trying to provide, and also, in order for that provider to get paid by the gov. If the gov doesn't approve, the provider won't get paid, and the service treatment won't be done.

2. Some drugs are addictive, so the docs have to be careful in prescribing them. The gov doesn't approve of people getting addicted, as that causes a whole lot of other problems.

2. Most drugs have side effects. Some of these can be harmful. Since everyone has a different biochemistry, there is no way to be absolutely sure, ahead of time, how each individual will react to the meds. Also, not everyone will be helped by every med for the same reason--different biochemistry.

So, docs in countries with national health care systems tend to be leery of rushing into medicating people.

Here in the USA it's somewhat different. Responsible docs will try non drug methods first, but many docs are pressured or bribed by drug companies to prescribe the drugs made by those companies, and not always to the benefit of the patients.

Before rushing into taking meds for your depression there are other things you can try.

- Exercise. It generates mood boosting endorphins.

- Read funny stories and watch funny shows. Humor also generates endorphins.

- Eat healthy, and enough of it. A healthier diet will boost your immune system and is also good for your mind. Skimping on amount of food leads to depression, crankiness, and being more prone to get sick.

- Get enough rest. Being tired leads to depression, crankiness, and being more prone to get sick, too.

- Listen to and/or play music. This is mood boosting.

- Take courses, either in person, or online. Some of the online ones are free. The in person ones are a good way to meet people.

- Volunteer. There are people worse off than we are, who would really appreciate the help. It's also a good way to meet people, and boost your self image and mood.

- Take up a hobby or join a club. These are good ways to meet people who share your interests.

- Get involved in community activities. Attend town meetings, events at local libraries and other local organizations. Attend local sporting events, fairs, and art shows. Attend and/or participate in local theater groups. These are all great ways to meet people and boost your self image and mood.

Now, go and do something! :D


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redrobin62
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07 Jun 2012, 6:50 pm

<----- Wants to marry Questor simply for the depth of information she gives!



jackbus01
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08 Jun 2012, 4:09 pm

If nothing else, you should be evaluated by a pyschiatrist. Prescribing meds to teens is a lot riskier than adults, but if you are at the point to require impatient services than it might make sense to try some meds. You also might want to tell a psychiatrist why you find therapy "pointless". Maybe you need a new therapist too.

I'm not in the UK so I don't know how to "work" the NHS system to get what you need.



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09 Jun 2012, 4:14 am

I'm in the UK and my GP put me on 20mg of Paroxetine a day - I found that upping it to 40mg really has made a significant difference to my mood. I don't get the deep highs and lows that I'm used to and it's also helped a great deal with panic disorder and anxiety.

It buggers up your sex drive and can lead to weight gain, but in balance, the positives far outweigh the negatives. Just a suggestion.

Good luck!


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09 Jun 2012, 6:20 am

questor wrote:
Before rushing into taking meds for your depression there are other things you can try.

- Exercise. It generates mood boosting endorphins.

- Read funny stories and watch funny shows. Humor also generates endorphins.

- Eat healthy, and enough of it. A healthier diet will boost your immune system and is also good for your mind. Skimping on amount of food leads to depression, crankiness, and being more prone to get sick.

- Get enough rest. Being tired leads to depression, crankiness, and being more prone to get sick, too.

- Listen to and/or play music. This is mood boosting.

- Take courses, either in person, or online. Some of the online ones are free. The in person ones are a good way to meet people.

- Volunteer. There are people worse off than we are, who would really appreciate the help. It's also a good way to meet people, and boost your self image and mood.

- Take up a hobby or join a club. These are good ways to meet people who share your interests.

- Get involved in community activities. Attend town meetings, events at local libraries and other local organizations. Attend local sporting events, fairs, and art shows. Attend and/or participate in local theater groups. These are all great ways to meet people and boost your self image and mood.

Now, go and do something! :D


I know you mean well but I find the implications of this sentiment to beslightly insulting. Sometimes depression is 100% biological.

The people who always say that placebo is as effective as SSRI's will invariably (if they are honest) admit that severe biological depression actually does improve with medication. It is only moderate depression that responds equally to placebo and exercise or diet.

To the OP, docs tend not to like to prescribe medication. The main reason is probably that they are afraid of being sued. In some cases, SSRI's can cause dangerous side effects like suicidal thoughts, so a great deal of caution is taken when prescribing them (if the doctor has a conscience at least)



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13 Jun 2012, 8:46 pm

heavenlyabyss wrote:
I know you mean well but I find the implications of this sentiment to beslightly insulting. Sometimes depression is 100% biological.

The people who always say that placebo is as effective as SSRI's will invariably (if they are honest) admit that severe biological depression actually does improve with medication. It is only moderate depression that responds equally to placebo and exercise or diet.

To the OP, docs tend not to like to prescribe medication. The main reason is probably that they are afraid of being sued. In some cases, SSRI's can cause dangerous side effects like suicidal thoughts, so a great deal of caution is taken when prescribing them (if the doctor has a conscience at least)


Yes, exactly!

The OP was describing a situation where things were bad enough that medication would probably be reasonable to try. From everything I have read, prescribing antidepressents to adolescents is to be done with a great deal of caution. There is a proven risk of increased suicidality to the point that ssri drugs have recieved "black-box" warnings on the pdr sheets. The horror stories about ssri drugs tend to have two common themes: they were proscribed to persons with clinically minor issues and the dangerous side effects of akathesia were underplayed or ignored.

I truly think that some people don't understand "severe depression". It is possible for people with mood disorders to reach states of mind that are impossible for "normal" people to reach. If I start slipping into a severe depression I can often get out in the early stages with the usual feel-good advice, but if I'm not careful it can greatly worsen to the point where only medication can get me out.



nolan1971
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14 Jun 2012, 12:59 pm

I have rapid cycling bi-polar which means my mood changes 3-4 times a day.
Lithium has helped a great deal and it is cheap too!
Only costs me $10 a month :D



SaNcheNuSS
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14 Jun 2012, 4:04 pm

Hey. I made an album about people with AUtism. It can help you. Please go listen. It will answer your questions.
http://nibirunon.bandcamp.com/album/nibirunon



vindaloo
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24 Jun 2012, 10:01 am

When I lived in the UK I was once prescribed 20mg paroxetine (seroxat) within 5 minutes of seeing my GP and it definitely made me worse. The doctor recommended I give it a proper try but I ended up ditching it after 8-9 months as I was totally fed up with having constant heartburn, insomnia, horrible dreams and no sex drive as well as being depressed which is why I went in the first place. I made much better progress by sorting my diet out, getting regular exercise, removing sources of stress from my life and talking more openly with people close to me about what was going on. I get the distinct impression that the NHS is dreadfully underequipped to deal with mental health issues and will prescribe something instead of looking to fix the underlying issues.