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fefe333
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21 Jun 2012, 9:20 pm

my friend made me take a quiz on okcupid and I got 54% likely to be an indigo child.
what are indigo children anyway?


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I am a 14 year old girl.
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Delphiki
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21 Jun 2012, 9:21 pm

The New age version of autism where autistic people are higher entities compared to other people.

So yeah...


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lostgirl1986
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21 Jun 2012, 9:27 pm

My take on it is it's parents of children with AS who glamorize and glorify AS as if it's a blessed gift calling their children indigo children. I think parents don't like some of the stereotypes that come with AS so they want to glamorize it. That's just my opinion though.



nirrti_rachelle
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21 Jun 2012, 9:53 pm

"Indigo" and "Chrystal" children are just fancy labels that New Agers have for kids on the autism spectrum and ADHD. There's nothing new about cultures coming up with all kinds of mythical explanations about people who differ from the norm. It is just recently that we have used the medical model of disabilities to explain differences rather than come up with something about "changlings", "elves", two-spirited people or whatever.

Besides, some parents would just rather believe anything in the world no matter how ridiculous than acknowledge that their child might not be the perfect offspring they can vicariously live out their aspirations through.


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Kinme
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21 Jun 2012, 10:26 pm

I just picture a child that is indigo in color. That is all.



redrobin62
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21 Jun 2012, 11:29 pm

When I lived in Nashville I met a man. I forgot his name. He had a wife, a good job, and a house in the suburbs He was looking to adopt a dog so he'd came by the house I was living in to look. we had a small dog that was a bit of a burden and was looking to get him adopted. The man technically had his dream all together - except for his daughter. He loved her but it wasn't the child he was hoping for. Both he and his wife are healthy but the daughter's an "Indigo child." She's autistic but of the severe kind. At 11 years old she still doesn't talk. Actually, she did speak, but at a rate of about 5 words/week. You can just look in this man's face and see the disappointment. Pretty heartbreaking.



Zinia
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21 Jun 2012, 11:45 pm

Haha

I've never heard a lot of the definitions on here, but I think they're super interesting.

As far as I understand, Indigo Child is a New Age label for a type of person who is being born more. Indigo children are supposed to help usher in a new age in humanity.

From what I remember, Indigo Children tend to keep to the background, though they have strong ideals and a concern for people and the earth, and are trying to prepare the earth for a stage of love and acceptance. They tend to correlate with the indigo chakra (the third eye), thus the name. The name "Indigo" refers to their auras, which are indigo colored.

Crystal children are the following wave of humans, characterized by their crystal like auras. Easily shattered, they require Indigos to pave the way for their arrival.



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21 Jun 2012, 11:48 pm

Combine a parent's belief that his child is special and unlike any other with a bit of new-agey flakiness, and you get indigo children. It's not just autistic kids that get labeled that way--also gifted ones, ADHD, learning disabled, or just average kids whose parents are a little loopy.

It's mostly harmless. The only real drawback I see in it is that a parent might delay getting an autistic child any useful therapy if they concluded that they didn't need help because they were an indigo child. But most of the time, the indigo-child thing only really pops up after the diagnosis as a way for the parent to tell themselves, "My child can't possibly be disabled; s/he's too wonderful to have such a tragic thing happen to them!" Of course they don't think of the fact that a disabled kid is NOT tragic--that they don't have to buy into all that crap--that a disabled kid can be wonderful and special and all the things a parent sees in their dear child. Some parents, though, just don't bother to think and conclude that their child must be an indigo child instead. It's a bit silly, but I'd have preferred "indigo child" to "rebellious, lazy brat" any day.


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bizboy1
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21 Jun 2012, 11:55 pm

Image



again_with_this
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22 Jun 2012, 12:10 am

I thought those with Asperger's were more likely to be rational and logical. No one is calling this out for the BS it is?

I always thought "indigo children" were supposed to be super emotional and very in tune with the "feelings" of others. I think it's bunk, but I highly doubt someone with Asperger's would qualify as an indigo child. In many ways, it sounds like a child who is pretentiously (and self-righteously) NT.



bizboy1
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22 Jun 2012, 12:13 am

again_with_this wrote:
I thought those with Asperger's were more likely to be rational and logical. No one is calling this out for the BS it is?

I always thought "indigo children" were supposed to be super emotional and very in tune with the "feelings" of others. I think it's bunk, but I highly doubt someone with Asperger's would qualify as an indigo child. In many ways, it sounds like a child who is pretentiously (and self-righteously) NT.


Of course it's BS.



redrobin62
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22 Jun 2012, 12:14 am

@Callista - goof, and dangerous, point. Withholding care like that is detrimental to their health. I'm thinking about Jehovah's Witness people who withhold medical care (blood transfusions, etc) because of their religion. Sad case of affairs.



again_with_this
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22 Jun 2012, 12:27 am

bizboy1 wrote:
again_with_this wrote:
I thought those with Asperger's were more likely to be rational and logical. No one is calling this out for the BS it is?

I always thought "indigo children" were supposed to be super emotional and very in tune with the "feelings" of others. I think it's bunk, but I highly doubt someone with Asperger's would qualify as an indigo child. In many ways, it sounds like a child who is pretentiously (and self-righteously) NT.


Of course it's BS.


Right, but what I'm saying is why is it being compared to autism.

From the descriptions of indigo children, being so empathetic and deeply in tune with the non-verbals of others, an autistic would be a terrible candidate for the BS label. Get my point?



Zinia
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22 Jun 2012, 12:30 am

again_with_this wrote:
I thought those with Asperger's were more likely to be rational and logical. No one is calling this out for the BS it is?

I always thought "indigo children" were supposed to be super emotional and very in tune with the "feelings" of others. I think it's bunk, but I highly doubt someone with Asperger's would qualify as an indigo child. In many ways, it sounds like a child who is pretentiously (and self-righteously) NT.


I never associated AS children with Indigo kids, but I do remember hearing that Indigo Children talk less--may even go through a period of silence--but it is attributed to telepathy rather than autism.

I've never heard about pretension or self-righteousness of Indigo Children. I think the idea is fueled by a desire to see future generations fix the mistakes of the past.



again_with_this
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22 Jun 2012, 12:43 am

Zinia wrote:
I never associated AS children with Indigo kids, but I do remember hearing that Indigo Children talk less--may even go through a period of silence--but it is attributed to telepathy rather than autism.

I've never heard about pretension or self-righteousness of Indigo Children. I think the idea is fueled by a desire to see future generations fix the mistakes of the past.


That they "feel they have a right to be here," as if others don't? That they "know better than those around them, even all the adults." Yes, it is a bit pretentious.