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mmcool
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25 Aug 2012, 8:08 pm

the word nurotypical is getting old and it's meaning is not that right we need a new word for nurotypicals

please reply with suggestions



idratherbeatree
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25 Aug 2012, 8:32 pm

Uhhh... why? It's better than Neuronormative.
It gets the point across.


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Vulture
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25 Aug 2012, 9:35 pm

There's no good word. I think that any term used will end up either pissing off people on the spectrum, offending people not on the spectrum by sounding somehow insulting or just be too awkward and unnecessary.



Chronos
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25 Aug 2012, 11:15 pm

mmcool wrote:
the word nurotypical is getting old and it's meaning is not that right we need a new word for nurotypicals

please reply with suggestions


There was a word. "Normal". However some individuals took offence to the implication that they were not normal.



Feralucce
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26 Aug 2012, 4:03 pm

exactly... Normal, in the dictionary, meant free from mental aberrations or mental illness


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26 Aug 2012, 6:47 pm

What about...

BN - Balanced Neurotype

vs

SN - Specialized Neurotype

They're not catchy or rhymey but you're going to have a hard time finding terms that aren't prohibitively awkward and simultaneously inoffensive.



AScomposer13413
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26 Aug 2012, 8:32 pm

As much as like this idea, the question I have is: Balanced based on what?


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26 Aug 2012, 8:55 pm

Balance as in the strength of different traits most common in individuals. If there's some pair of words that adequately describes accurately and honestly both people on and off the spectrum that doesn't irritate a great number of people I'm open to hearing them.



haidouk
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26 Aug 2012, 10:48 pm

mmcool wrote:
the word nurotypical is getting old and it's meaning is not that right we need a new word for nurotypicals

please reply with suggestions

1) Actually, the word neurotypical is, comparatively very, very new.

2) Since when does a word's age have anything to do with anything (its appropriateness, value, descriptiveness, etc). It seems you're trying to say you're unhappy with this word for some particular reason, but don't want to identify what that reason is. If you explained this, I might be inclined to be on your side on this, but on the basis of the word's age, I'm not. What exactly about its meaning is wrong? It seems very clear and accurate to me.

3) People should not be hung up on "normal", which simply means "most commonly occurring". "Normal" isn't something anyone should feel a need to aspire to. It's literally referring to commonness. The far bigger problem is the fear that makes people uncomfortable with their uniqueness. Have pride and appreciation for who you are. Not in the sense of "superiority", but just love yourself for exactly who you are. Be kind to yourself and give yourself a break. Don't judge yourself by the standards of ignorant and hostile people, or try to prove anything to them. You are different (i.e. not "normal")? FANTASTIC! You are actually an interesting person who has value and who brings who brings something to the table. Abandoning this (which you can't really do anyway) just to "fit in" is what is truly objectionable, and quite sad.



haidouk
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26 Aug 2012, 10:53 pm

Vulture wrote:
What about...

BN - Balanced Neurotype

vs

SN - Specialized Neurotype

They're not catchy or rhymey but you're going to have a hard time finding terms that aren't prohibitively awkward and simultaneously inoffensive.


This is not good: "Balanced" is a euphemism for "sane", and by contrast "unbalanced" (which would be the assumed distinction) for "insane". How is this any kind of improvement? I find the existing terms far more agreeable, problem free, and simply accurate.



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26 Aug 2012, 11:20 pm

The existing term is not entirely fine because while the word "typical" should not be offensive it has assumed a negative feel with people.

"Typical" has become a word that quite easily leaves the lips dripping with disdain.



haidouk
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26 Aug 2012, 11:42 pm

I'm a wordy person and this seems overly analytical to me. People have to be strong and stand by words that are accurate--to own their language. When one becomes too apologetic about language (i.e. "it's correct but some people just don't like it") it places one in the position of perpetual weakness, which is never to one's advantage, and which is more problematic than the word itself. Own your words. YOU define them and don't let them be defined for you. Don't let people steal perfectly good words from you. When you start letting people do this, it never ends and it becomes a game of boxing you in and positioning you in place of weakness. Don't accept that. Don't be afraid to use words that are perfectly good.

Maybe I'm missing something here but I find people aren't being clear enough about what precisely their problem is with this. Is the problem that you think "neurotypical" is hurtful or unfair to NT's? Or is the problem that you think "neurotypical" is disparaging to autistic people by contrast? Clarification of this point would be most welcome. Thanks.



Alvin31
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27 Aug 2012, 9:52 am

-Normal
-the majority
-Neurotypical
-the mainstreamer



zxy8
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27 Aug 2012, 9:56 am

I just call people normal. I will never use the other word, as it just seems like an attempt from aspy people to categorize normal people into the disability spectrum, therefore, trying to say that no one is normal and everyone is disabled in some way. The fact is, aspy people are not normal. While everyone is different, there is a clear line as to what is normal and what is not.



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28 Aug 2012, 3:58 am

I guess I like "neurotypical" myself. John Elder Robison has very overtly and intentionally used 'nypical" as a shortened form of the word in his latest book "Be Different". I can't say I'm very fond of the contraction.

Neurotypical seems to have seeped into the literature about Asperger syndrome that I've read recently, so I think it is probably here to stay.

(Robison also uses "Aspergian" and "proto-Aspergian" as I recall which are fun, but I think "Aspie" is likely to stick.)


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