I was diagnosed with AS, this morning...

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KnarlyDUDE09
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05 Oct 2012, 7:41 am

I'm not really sure what to make of it... :?

...any advice?


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Catamount
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05 Oct 2012, 7:50 am

Live your life. You're still the same person you were yesterday.



KnarlyDUDE09
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05 Oct 2012, 7:53 am

Catamount wrote:
Live your life. You're still the same person you were yesterday.
Good advice, though I do feel a sort of relief, but I'm not sure what else. :)


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mike_br
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05 Oct 2012, 8:13 am

Is felt really weird for a while.
Let it sink in... If you have to, find the one person you trust the most and talk about it.



KnarlyDUDE09
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05 Oct 2012, 8:15 am

mike_br wrote:
Is felt really weird for a while.
Let it sink in... If you have to, find the one person you trust the most and talk about it.
Thanks...I think I might just do that. :)


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the_beautiful_mess
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05 Oct 2012, 8:17 am

No matter how prepared or relaxed you are about it, it will take a bit of time to properly accept the fact you have it but that you haven't changed. Like someone already said, you're still the same person, you just have a label now that says AS, and this label turns out to be quite helpful a lot of the time.

Don't be afraid to ask someone if you can talk any worries through with them (parent, partner, GP, whoever) or you can even PM me if you don't feel like talking to any of them. It's cool with me. :)

:elephant:


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KnarlyDUDE09
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05 Oct 2012, 8:19 am

the_beautiful_mess wrote:
No matter how prepared or relaxed you are about it, it will take a bit of time to properly accept the fact you have it but that you haven't changed. Like someone already said, you're still the same person, you just have a label now that says AS, and this label turns out to be quite helpful a lot of the time.

Don't be afraid to ask someone if you can talk any worries through with them (parent, partner, GP, whoever) or you can even PM me if you don't feel like talking to any of them. It's cool with me. :)

:elephant:
Thanks for your advice. :)


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StuartN
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05 Oct 2012, 9:06 am

KnarlyDUDE09 wrote:
I'm not really sure what to make of it... :?


I found the diagnosis really helpful and positive. For me, the diagnosis explains so many aspects of life that are odd or difficult, especially things that other people do not seem to relate to. For example, getting bad emotional feelings in public places and knowing that they come from the sensory exposure, not from something bad that is happening.

Read up about ASD and see what bits fit for you - some will, and some will not.



KnarlyDUDE09
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05 Oct 2012, 9:40 am

StuartN wrote:
KnarlyDUDE09 wrote:
I'm not really sure what to make of it... :?


I found the diagnosis really helpful and positive. For me, the diagnosis explains so many aspects of life that are odd or difficult, especially things that other people do not seem to relate to. For example, getting bad emotional feelings in public places and knowing that they come from the sensory exposure, not from something bad that is happening.

Read up about ASD and see what bits fit for you - some will, and some will not.
Thanks for your advice. :)


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kBillingsley
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05 Oct 2012, 9:50 am

I remember when I was diagnosed. I denied it for a while, I hope you do better than I did.



onks
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05 Oct 2012, 12:34 pm

KnarlyDUDE09 wrote:
I'm not really sure what to make of it... :?

...any advice?


What might happen is that you'd feel quite bad because this is a big thing if you start thinking about it.
Be sure that you are doing fine.

Do not do any big changes, if these big changes were not the reason why you were diagnosed.
See a lot of friends. Keep your "personal order". Avoid stress.
You are sensitive now, more than normal

Symptoms might come that you never thought about could be possible

First a relief than bad feelings. That's how it was for me and still is...

The point is more or less:
Now you probably think that it is quite easy to adapt to the new situation just by figuring it out.
It is not that easy, unfortunately. There are a lot of things that you won't find easily an answer for

And then there is all the sad situations that you have experienced.
Now you'll know or get an idea of, why that was so.

Best is to just continue as normal and not too much think about these things.
See friends, get support by any means if you don't feel well.

All this is only in case that you feel not so well about it. Or if you develop into that direction.
Don't simply change too much. Take your time



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05 Oct 2012, 1:47 pm

I would say that you have an advantage since you have suspected it for a while. Thus, it sort of blunts much of the shock that would come to someone who had never heard of it or researched it. At least that is how I imagine I would react were I to get an actual diagnosis rather than sitting in the self-diagnosed limbo I am in now. In the end, it doesn't change who you are but rather helps to explain some of the difficulties you have experienced.


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Logicalmom
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05 Oct 2012, 2:04 pm

I had to some make retrospective adjustments, which included some grief and anger (the path my life took and how it might have looked had I been caught and diagnosed early on in life), but I will tell you as it has settled: WHAT A RELIEF! Yes, I still have to live with 'me', no it doesn't make all the troubles go away, but I so needed this. I feel like I am starting 'now' with who I "really am". I am a woman with Aspergers. I have validation, and now that I know what I am dealing with with certainty, I can proceed to problem-solve my life going with who I am and not berating myself for not getting the results I hoped for by measuring "myself" against neuro-typical standards. I can say: of course that wasn't working, and "here is why". It is like gaining permission to be myself. I tried too hard for too long to fit the mold. It's too tiring and defeating. Maybe I should be more upset ad sober about it, but you know I always knew I was different and without that diagnosis I would still know something wasn't "right". I think knowledge is - or at least, 'can be' - a powerful tool. It's up to you.



Raziel
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05 Oct 2012, 2:10 pm

For a certain time you will maybe be confused, you will see yourself maybe different, even read more about it, rethink your behaviour you had in the past. Maybe you don't have this at all, but propably you will in one way or the other.

And, then after some days, weeks, months or even years, after all this journey you took to understand youself better, you will come to the conclusion that you are still the same person you have ever been. :D


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05 Oct 2012, 6:04 pm

I felt relief after getting my PDD-NOS diagnosis, but that's because I acknowledged I was on the spectrum for a few years at that point.

I remember feeling kind of sad after a few other diagnosis', though.


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