Getting tested for aspergers? Is it worth it?

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epicfailchelle
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12 Apr 2013, 12:37 am

I have most of the symptoms for it. Now I'm wondering how much will it cost, what happens, and if it is worth it.
I also heard it is harder to find in girls? I'm not sure if that is true or not. If it is I'm worried I'll waste my money if they told me I didnt have it when I secretly do. I'm also paranoid they may fase diagnose me for something and put me on some medication that I don't need...
Thanks!



redrobin62
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12 Apr 2013, 12:51 am

Clinical psychologists can diagnose you but aren't permitted to prescribe medications. They usually average between $85 to 400 for a one or two day session. Registered diagnosticians can be found at the link below. You can thank me later.

Therapists, etc



Tsproggy
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12 Apr 2013, 12:51 am

It helps if you want closure on figuring out why you where so different growing up and things like that. Knowing your short comings can sometimes help you overcome and adapt. Otherwise I've found it's not much more useful then that. When I got evaluated I never had to tell my evaluator that I thought I had this or that, I actually got taken there as a joke and found out my mental health is nothing to joke about..

good luck



LupaLuna
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12 Apr 2013, 1:15 am

I think that if you get an official diagnosis. You can get about a $8K a year deduction on your federal taxes. Don't quote me on this.



redrobin62
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12 Apr 2013, 1:19 am

<--- Wishes he could get an $8K deduction on taxes. :(



Koblih
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12 Apr 2013, 3:44 am

I don´t see a point in paying someone for diagnosing you. What do you really want from them? A label? Lets say that a doctor will tell you that you´re normal, but if you really feel different, you won´t belong anywhere. I felt relieved when I diagnosed myself, it wasn´t me against the whole world anymore. And if a doctor confirms that you´re an aspie than what? If you need a theraphy, start a therapy, if you need pills, get some pills, if you like to read this blog and learn about aspergers, than continue. What use is a diagnosis?



Last edited by Koblih on 12 Apr 2013, 7:17 am, edited 1 time in total.

briankelley
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12 Apr 2013, 4:02 am

To me this always comes down to the same question. How debilitating is it? Or how serious is it? If someone has something seriously wrong with them or they suspect it, they get it checked. They don't hem and haw about it, they make a beeline to get diagnosed.



Briarsprout
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12 Apr 2013, 4:35 am

A)
It helps if going to college - you can get special services if needed in classroom ie tape recording classes.

B)
It helps with telling your employer and need to be in quiet place for example (but telling your employer can be a double edged sword)



Lamplighter
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12 Apr 2013, 6:36 am

Whether it would be helpful to you depends on you personally and your life, past and present. For me, at the time that I sought a diagnosis, it was important. I went in with relative certainty that I had AS or was high-functioning autistic (if you want to make the distinction, based on what I was told about my early childhood). I also knew I had been evaluated for autism as a young child, because I wasn't functioning the way I was supposed to (if you'd asked my parents), but I was never informed of the outcome - though, given that I heard chunks of their conversations with others ("not severe enough for institutationalisation") I suppose it was a positive for autism or something on the spectrum.

I wanted the validation. I wanted to feel allowed to be who I am. I know that there are people who will probably go "pfft" at this and say that you don't need permission to be who you are, but I will speculate that they grew up and continue to live in more accepting surroundings and aren't under the same unrelenting pressure to conform, or that they just happen to be a better fit for their particular environment by chance. If your environment is largely hostile, though, the validation that you really are different and can't adapt to perfection in order to fit in perfectly can really be liberating. It relieves you of the pressure to try where it really isn't necessary and can help you to build up the strength to demand more tolerance from others for your way of being. Labels aren't the enemy, intolerance is. If people think labels are bad, then I would hold that avoiding them also gives you a default label: normal. You don't get to avoid labels. And normal comes with the expectation to be entirely normal, something that the overwhelming majority of people on the spectrum aren't ideally positioned to be. And now we're back to whether your environment tolerates the deviation or not, and whether the label 'AS' would help you to be more like you need to be.

Also, as mentioned by others, an official diagnosis can help you get the special services you need at uni or adjustments you need at work. I'm not sure if these things are routinely available where you are - the extent of help available and the willingness of employers to make adjustments tends to be based on legislation, and this varies greatly across countries. But as far as I know, quite a few western countries that I know have by now made provisions for the help and adjustments available to autistic people, if they want them. (Which is not to say there's nothing available outside "the west" - it just means I don't know.)

There really isn't a universal answer to whether a diagnosis is helpful. It depends on you and your personal circumstances.

ETA: In most places that I know of, no one can just put you on medication against your will. Doctors are, essentially, service providers. I know that most doctors act like they get to decide what happens to you, but you must (really, for the sake of your own well-being) learn to think of them as your help to get the treatment you want and need, and not let them order you around against your explicit wishes. Standing up for yourself to doctors and making your wishes clear will (with almost perfect certainty) be met with resistance, especially if you're a woman, but it is essential that you do. If your doctors just won't cooperate, it is really worth it to find better ones. Been there, done that, got the T-shirt. You only have this one body, and only you have to live with it (in it) for the rest of your life. No one else gets to have a say.



DarkRain
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12 Apr 2013, 10:06 am

How do you secretly have something? I'm just curious about this.



Bluespace
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12 Apr 2013, 12:12 pm

oops - below..



Last edited by Bluespace on 12 Apr 2013, 12:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Bluespace
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12 Apr 2013, 12:20 pm

Bluespace wrote:
I wanted the validation. I wanted to feel allowed to be who I am. I know that there are people who will probably go "pfft" at this and say that you don't need permission to be who you are, but I will speculate that they grew up and continue to live in more accepting surroundings and aren't under the same unrelenting pressure to conform, or that they just happen to be a better fit for their particular environment by chance. If your environment is largely hostile, though, the validation that you really are different and can't adapt to perfection in order to fit in perfectly can really be liberating. It relieves you of the pressure to try where it really isn't necessary and can help you to build up the strength to demand more tolerance from others for your way of being. Labels aren't the enemy, intolerance is. If people think labels are bad, then I would hold that avoiding them also gives you a default label: normal. You don't get to avoid labels. And normal comes with the expectation to be entirely normal, something that the overwhelming majority of people on the spectrum aren't ideally positioned to be. And now we're back to whether your environment tolerates the deviation or not, and whether the label 'AS' would help you to be more like you need to be.


This is EXACTLY why I am seeking a diagnosis, you explain it well lamplighter. A couple of people have questioned my 'need for a label' but I couldn't explain it as well as this to them. I am a bit worried about not being believed or if people think I'm a hypocondriac or something.



Sethno
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12 Apr 2013, 9:43 pm

redrobin62 wrote:
Clinical psychologists can diagnose you but aren't permitted to prescribe medications. They usually average between $85 to 400 for a one or two day session. Registered diagnosticians can be found at the link below. You can thank me later.

Therapists, etc



Sorry, RR62, but are these doctors at the link specialists in autism?

If not, isn't there the danger of getting a quack who isn't qualified to say "yes" or "no" on this?


_________________
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Your Aspie score: 100 of 200 / Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 101 of 200
You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits

What would these results mean? Been told here I must be a "half pint".


Sethno
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12 Apr 2013, 9:54 pm

Bluespace wrote:
Bluespace wrote:
I wanted the validation. I wanted to feel allowed to be who I am. I know that there are people who will probably go "pfft" at this and say that you don't need permission to be who you are, but I will speculate that they grew up and continue to live in more accepting surroundings and aren't under the same unrelenting pressure to conform, or that they just happen to be a better fit for their particular environment by chance. If your environment is largely hostile, though, the validation that you really are different and can't adapt to perfection in order to fit in perfectly can really be liberating. It relieves you of the pressure to try where it really isn't necessary and can help you to build up the strength to demand more tolerance from others for your way of being. Labels aren't the enemy, intolerance is. If people think labels are bad, then I would hold that avoiding them also gives you a default label: normal. You don't get to avoid labels. And normal comes with the expectation to be entirely normal, something that the overwhelming majority of people on the spectrum aren't ideally positioned to be. And now we're back to whether your environment tolerates the deviation or not, and whether the label 'AS' would help you to be more like you need to be.


This is EXACTLY why I am seeking a diagnosis, you explain it well lamplighter. A couple of people have questioned my 'need for a label' but I couldn't explain it as well as this to them. I am a bit worried about not being believed or if people think I'm a hypocondriac or something.


Blue...

You didn't write all that. Lamplighter did.


_________________
AQ 31
Your Aspie score: 100 of 200 / Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 101 of 200
You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits

What would these results mean? Been told here I must be a "half pint".


Bluespace
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13 Apr 2013, 9:09 am

Sethno wrote:
Bluespace wrote:
Bluespace wrote:
I wanted the validation. I wanted to feel allowed to be who I am. I know that there are people who will probably go "pfft" at this and say that you don't need permission to be who you are, but I will speculate that they grew up and continue to live in more accepting surroundings and aren't under the same unrelenting pressure to conform, or that they just happen to be a better fit for their particular environment by chance. If your environment is largely hostile, though, the validation that you really are different and can't adapt to perfection in order to fit in perfectly can really be liberating. It relieves you of the pressure to try where it really isn't necessary and can help you to build up the strength to demand more tolerance from others for your way of being. Labels aren't the enemy, intolerance is. If people think labels are bad, then I would hold that avoiding them also gives you a default label: normal. You don't get to avoid labels. And normal comes with the expectation to be entirely normal, something that the overwhelming majority of people on the spectrum aren't ideally positioned to be. And now we're back to whether your environment tolerates the deviation or not, and whether the label 'AS' would help you to be more like you need to be.


This is EXACTLY why I am seeking a diagnosis, you explain it well lamplighter. A couple of people have questioned my 'need for a label' but I couldn't explain it as well as this to them. I am a bit worried about not being believed or if people think I'm a hypocondriac or something.


Hi! didn't even realise I had done this! I am new here and I was having trouble with quoting someone, as I hadn't done it before - I ended up posting the comment and then it didnt put it into a quote box so I copied it again (from my post!) to try to get the quote thing to work. I never saw that it said my name instead of lamplighters. I realise it would seem like I was trying to take credit for something someone else wrote, I never even saw this until you pointed this out and I looked again! It was a simple mistake.
Blue...

You didn't write all that. Lamplighter did.