High-paying, low stress jobs list - Aspie ideal!

Page 1 of 2 [ 20 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

Jayo
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 31 Jan 2011
Gender: Male
Posts: 864

09 Nov 2013, 7:36 pm

Here is a list of 15 jobs that are low on the stress index, but high on the pay scale...and all 15 of them are PERFECT for Aspies!! ! Well, OK, I use a bit of hyperbole there - they are much better than average matches for the average person with Aspergers. By and large, we most certainly have the academic aptitude to get our license or degree or whatever in these professions, and (with plenty of grit and perseverance) we can master the applied knowledge part of it. I'm in one of these categories myself :) Such jobs are relatively low on executive function, social finesse and most definitely in motor skills - of course, the bigger obstacle in any given one of them is acceptance by the herd, depending on how many co-workers you have and the culture of the place...in any case, read on...

http://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/15-hig ... 28403.html



ghoti
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 May 2012
Age: 52
Gender: Male
Posts: 6,737

09 Nov 2013, 8:17 pm

i am a #2, but still can't find work as i dont't have the "people skills" they are now all looking for.



starkid
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 9 Feb 2012
Gender: Female
Posts: 5,129
Location: California

09 Nov 2013, 10:21 pm

Hmm, I don't know about this list...I used to aspire to be a technical writer and a computer systems analyst (which I assume falls under the category of job 9.), but research into these fields suggested that they required too much interpersonal contact. Technical writers must regularly interview SMEs (subject matter experts) for the information they write about. Computer systems analysts have to talk to various people in the organization they are working with to find out the users' requirements and skill levels before designing and implementing the computer systems; after that, they are sometimes expected to provide training on those systems. I guess it could work for someone who interacts well in a structured environment, but for people who are fatigued by talking, have voice modulation problems, have difficulty processing verbal information, or cannot multitask (listen and write simultaneously), these jobs don't seem so appropriate.

Likewise, orthodontist, optometrist, dental assistant – they don't really involve typical social interaction, but one must have enough interpersonal skills to put the patients at ease and get them to follow directions (monotone voice, unusual prosody might be a barrier here) and sufficient fine motor skills to avoid stabbing people in the mouth/eye. These medical jobs seem high-stress to me because the patients' health is on the line.

It all comes down to the skills and deficits each person has.


_________________
Assume nothing, question everything.
DX Central Auditory Processing Deficit


Fnord
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 40,896
Location: Stendec

09 Nov 2013, 10:25 pm

STEM professions rock!

Quote:
2. Engineers

Stress tolerance: 69.5
Average salary annually: $92,030

What they do: Engineers use science and mathematics to come up with economical solutions to technical problems.

Education requirements: Bachelor's degree

:thumleft: BOO-YAH!! !


_________________
 
“I must acknowledge, once and for all, that the
purpose of diplomacy is to prolong a crisis.”

— Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock, in the Star Trek
episode "The Mark of Gideon" (ep. 3.16, 1969)


ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 62
Gender: Male
Posts: 20,032
Location: Long Island, New York

10 Nov 2013, 3:27 am

No pressure? A mistake with a lot of those jobs can have serious consequences.


_________________
Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity

My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person. - Sara Luterman


Fnord
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 40,896
Location: Stendec

10 Nov 2013, 10:32 am

ASPartOfMe wrote:
No pressure? A mistake with a lot of those jobs can have serious consequences.

A mistake, you say?

No sir ... my calculations are always based upon the available data ... here, let me run those numbers for you again, and I'll get back to you ...


_________________
 
“I must acknowledge, once and for all, that the
purpose of diplomacy is to prolong a crisis.”

— Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock, in the Star Trek
episode "The Mark of Gideon" (ep. 3.16, 1969)


GoonSquad
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 11 May 2007
Age: 49
Gender: Male
Posts: 5,959
Location: International House of Paincakes...

10 Nov 2013, 10:34 am

^^^ No kidding... I guess those engineers aren't expected to implement any of their designs in the real world.
I've seen engineers cry during a rocky project start-up.
:roll:


_________________
No man is free who is not master of himself.~Epictetus


GoonSquad
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 11 May 2007
Age: 49
Gender: Male
Posts: 5,959
Location: International House of Paincakes...

10 Nov 2013, 10:37 am

Fnord wrote:
ASPartOfMe wrote:
No pressure? A mistake with a lot of those jobs can have serious consequences.

A mistake, you say?

No sir ... my calculations are always based upon the available data ... here, let me run those numbers for you again, and I'll get back to you ...


When money is on the line that sort of bullshit spreads thin VERY QUICKLY.


_________________
No man is free who is not master of himself.~Epictetus


Fnord
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 40,896
Location: Stendec

10 Nov 2013, 7:52 pm

GoonSquad wrote:
Fnord wrote:
ASPartOfMe wrote:
No pressure? A mistake with a lot of those jobs can have serious consequences.

A mistake, you say?

No sir ... my calculations are always based upon the available data ... here, let me run those numbers for you again, and I'll get back to you ...


When money is on the line that sort of bullshit spreads thin VERY QUICKLY.

That technician - the one who resigned last week - seems to have depolarized the plasma couplings and initiated a cascade failure in the primary data bus. We're working on a more fool-proof method, and should have something for you by Wednesday.

Meanwhile, can we have another $20,000 for a new Logic Analyzer?

If only we'd had one before this latest fiasco ...


_________________
 
“I must acknowledge, once and for all, that the
purpose of diplomacy is to prolong a crisis.”

— Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock, in the Star Trek
episode "The Mark of Gideon" (ep. 3.16, 1969)


Ann2011
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Jul 2011
Age: 49
Gender: Female
Posts: 4,514
Location: Ontario, Canada

10 Nov 2013, 9:54 pm

Well, that's great, but what about us less intelligent aspies? I'd love to be an astronomer or engineer, but I just don't get science and math. And dental work . . . I could not be that close to people all the time. Plus with my dexterity I could do some damage.

I'm hoping to get a cleaning job . . . I've not had much success with anything else.



Cyanide
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 24 Sep 2006
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,267
Location: The Pacific Northwest

11 Nov 2013, 7:18 pm

I'm going for #10 (actuary). I've passed the first 2 exams, but I've only had 2 interviews (I've applied for over 100 jobs).



FreeSpirit2000
Toucan
Toucan

User avatar

Joined: 7 Aug 2009
Age: 30
Gender: Male
Posts: 290
Location: Somewhere

14 Nov 2013, 9:18 pm

Jayo wrote:
Here is a list of 15 jobs that are low on the stress index, but high on the pay scale...and all 15 of them are PERFECT for Aspies!! ! Well, OK, I use a bit of hyperbole there - they are much better than average matches for the average person with Aspergers. By and large, we most certainly have the academic aptitude to get our license or degree or whatever in these professions, and (with plenty of grit and perseverance) we can master the applied knowledge part of it. I'm in one of these categories myself :) Such jobs are relatively low on executive function, social finesse and most definitely in motor skills - of course, the bigger obstacle in any given one of them is acceptance by the herd, depending on how many co-workers you have and the culture of the place...in any case, read on...

http://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/15-hig ... 28403.html



One thing possible could be jobs working in the entertainment field for example. They seem very low stress, actually speaking.



lammiu
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

User avatar

Joined: 2 Oct 2013
Gender: Female
Posts: 84
Location: Hong Kong

01 Dec 2013, 12:37 am

starkid wrote:
Hmm, I don't know about this list...I used to aspire to be a technical writer and a computer systems analyst (which I assume falls under the category of job 9.), but research into these fields suggested that they required too much interpersonal contact. Technical writers must regularly interview SMEs (subject matter experts) for the information they write about. Computer systems analysts have to talk to various people in the organization they are working with to find out the users' requirements and skill levels before designing and implementing the computer systems; after that, they are sometimes expected to provide training on those systems. I guess it could work for someone who interacts well in a structured environment, but for people who are fatigued by talking, have voice modulation problems, have difficulty processing verbal information, or cannot multitask (listen and write simultaneously), these jobs don't seem so appropriate.

I have also tried above roles for a few years and my experience agree with what you're saying especially in Asia, people expect you to be a quick learner. I found switching from projects to projects are very difficult for me. For us, learning new things and doing things in a different way is very difficult. If you work in Asia, I would like advice Aspies to AVOID working in the computer software field unless you're technically extremely stronger than most people because there is high discrimination to age. e.g. if you're 10 years out of school, they would expect you in management (1/10 chance for computer professionals to able to get those roles, otherwise becomes obsolete), they won't hire people doing pure technicals, just because your analytical speed is no longer as fast as the new graduates.

If you do decide you like software jobs, you need to have a solid plan for a secondary career after 10 years out of school. Otherwise, your career will struggle in mid way.


_________________
http://lammiuamy.blogspot.hk
The bible says, "God purposely chose... what the world considers weak in order to shame the powerful." Your weaknesses are not an accident. God deliberately allowed them in your life for the purpose of demonstrati


beneficii
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 10 May 2005
Age: 35
Gender: Female
Posts: 7,105

01 Dec 2013, 2:45 am

If you can get into workforce management, it's not very stressful, though it isn't the highest paying.


_________________
"You have a responsibility to consider all sides of a problem and a responsibility to make a judgment and a responsibility to care for all involved." --Ian Danskin


Kurgan
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Apr 2012
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,379
Location: Scandinavia

01 Dec 2013, 3:24 am

Fnord wrote:
ASPartOfMe wrote:
No pressure? A mistake with a lot of those jobs can have serious consequences.

A mistake, you say?

No sir ... my calculations are always based upon the available data ... here, let me run those numbers for you again, and I'll get back to you ...


A mistake by an engineer on an oil rig, can cost millions of dollars. The oil industry has one of the highest non-salary costs per employee as well.