Graduating soon with accounting degree (undergrad + grad)

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aspinnaker
Tufted Titmouse
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06 Jan 2015, 9:59 pm

Great! Thanks for sharing your experience.

Did you interview at the consulting firms that you alluded to and are you working for one now?

I'm interested to understand why you feel that they aren't particularly socially demanding (although I do agree that it should not be unreachable). You do hear of being put in front of clients, and being (hypothetically) stuck at airports with your interviewers, after all. Did you ever get taken to coffee/lunch/dinner before or after your interviews, and if so, how did you fare in those situations, where it is much more difficult to rehearse?

I've never heard specifically of an Aspie's experience with consulting interviews / work life so if this is something you can share, it would be much appreciated.



carthago
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07 Jan 2015, 5:59 am

I interviewed with many consulting firms and was made offers at all except one. Most interviews went something like this:

I apply
Two or three days later I get a call asking to set up a phone interview
After the phone interview, I'm asked to set up a phone behavioral interview (only a few firms do two phone interviews)
After the phone behavioral interview, I'm asked to set up an on-campus interview
The day before the on-campus interview, they take me to dinner with other interviewees (this is an unofficial interview)
For the on-campus interview, I'm interviewed either 2 or 3 times, or by a panel of 2 or 3 people (it's different for every firm)
(The interview involves a business case about 50% of the time. Don't fear the business case, it's actually a lot of fun, use your aspie traits to your advantage.)
After the on-campus interview, I'm asked to set up an office interview (they pay for the flight and limo or taxi)
The office interview is a gruelling 4 or 5 hours of panel interview after panel interview and ends with a partner/principal interview or two. There is some variation between the firms, but that's generally how it goes.
Most questions are non-technical, but there are many opportunities to talk about clients, culture, and some technical aspects of the job. Some firms have different teams interview you, and this is a great opportunity to show some interest and ask questions about their team and clients. What I found was that, at least at the entry level, process improvement experience is a magic ticket. You might have a magic ticket too--find it and play up your experience with it. Do you know SQL or Java? Do you manage your parents' investment portfolio? Do you speak 2 or 3 in-demand languages fluently? Find out what makes you stand out and bring it up as often as it is relevant.
In the end, I turned down consulting because an employer which shall not be named was offering a salary which shall not be uttered.



aspinnaker
Tufted Titmouse
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07 Jan 2015, 7:24 pm

That's excellent. I'm glad you found so much success in one of the most difficult jobs to get on the market.

Thanks for the insight and the advice. Your new job sounds exciting - I wish you the best of luck on it.