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tamshark
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07 Dec 2013, 3:38 am

Ok, I'm looking for some advice/input/opinions.....I have an 11y/o Aspie daughter that we are considering homeschooling when she is done with elementary school. She is high functioning and excels in academics. Her main problem is social situations and giggle incontinence, which we have just started using a very low dose Ritalin to help alleviate this issue. I am worried about her not outgrowing her incontinence and getting bullied and ridiculed during her middle school/high school years. Has anyone been homeschooled or know of someone that has? Pros/cons? Any info would be greatly appreciated.... :)



loosewheel
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07 Dec 2013, 6:19 am

I actually did it the other way around. I home schooled when they were young and having the greater difficulties. Then sent them to school when I felt they were more able to deal with it. At age 11 all 3 of my children that have been diagnosed with a disorder seemed to have a growth in awareness and things got a little easier for them across the board. After the second one did I realised a trend and remembered that in year 5, at 11, I went from the bottom class to the advanced class mid year. The children themselves don't notice any difference but observing them they seem to start doing better. I don't know if this is relevant for everyone. These cases are obviously only one genetic line.

I worked more on the philosophy of protecting and supporting them when they were unable to engage in these activities successfully, and integrating them into the school system when they had matured enough that they could. I got the timing a little wrong and had to take the younger one out and home school for an extra 1½ years due to social problems, before trying again. The world is where they have to survive as adults so I want them to develop these skills (positively) before they enter the world as adults. The younger one is now 12, and back at school for a year she's doing ok. Still some hurdles to go but the social monster hasn't raised it head again yet. The older 2, now in their senior years, have been doing ok for a while.

Ultimately I think just about any development and education regime can work so long as it takes into account their current potential, and a realistic plan to get them to their greatest potential as young adults. With home schooling there is quite a diversity of methodology. Whether they are enrolled through a distance education program or grow your own education curriculum. If they have any learning difficulties, whether the education program can be adapted to suit them. Home schooling can be an advantage for kids that have difficulties because it can be individually tailored, but increases the amount of research and work for you.

Also, especially coming into the teen years, her social skills are still going to have to be developed. She may need more protection and help in this area, but she still needs to be developing so she has a fair chance of integrating as she grows toward adulthood. You'll have to research as to whether the local opportunities exist to accommodate. This can be one of the more difficult areas as most children develop these skills at school. Generally people in a similar situation organise themselves with activities for this purpose.

As for the incontinence issue, I assume you're already using precautionary absorbent liners, but I have no experience with this issue to really say. Children do tend to get better with just about everything as they get older though.



TallyMan
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07 Dec 2013, 9:05 am

(Thread moved from Autism discussion to Parents')


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ASDMommyASDKid
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08 Dec 2013, 1:39 am

I am currently homeschooling an 8 yr old boy (my first year.)

I do not know much about what you can do about the giggle incontinence issue, but I would say if you can hide it effectively, I would not home school for that reason alone.[i]

How does your child view school now? Does she like it? How does she currently deal with peers?

The pros of homeschooling for us have been that I can tailor things to my son's special interests and splinter skills. I can take more time on things that are not as easily learned, and zoom ahead on the things he already knows. I don't have to worry about him being around mean kids and bullies. I can manage his environment and when he meltdown it does not escalate into a big deal as I know how to calm him down.

The cons are that b/c he is less stressed he is probably progressing more slowly on dealing with stress. The flexibility of home means he is not getting as much practice dealing with non-negotiables and unpleasant structure. He doesn't have to deal with other children, and is therefore not forced to learn social skills. I don't have access to some of the niftier expensive tech that the school has.

I am sure there are more things, but I am sleepy, so that is what I came up with. There are people who have been homeschooling for longer than I have, who can give more information.



aann
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10 Dec 2013, 7:15 am

Tamshark, do you have specific questions? I have homeschooled two kids for 9 years, so I might be able to help. There are millions of both pros and cons depending on what kind of homeschooling you choose to do and what supports are available in your town. The key is to find the right fit for your family. I would start researching homeschool groups in your area, especially since socialization is a concern for your dd.

Both my kids (NT and AS) have done very well in academic co-ops. On Tuesday they have all their classes. Throughout the week they do the homework for those classes. My AS child's slow processing drives me nuts, but this has been his best year. doing incredible work. He loves playing football with the kids at recess and considers all the boys his friends.

Like Loosewheel, I am interested in integrating my son into a school when he is older - probably high school for us.

Anyway, do a little research of homeschooling groups, and let us know if you have any specific questions.



MMJMOM
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10 Dec 2013, 7:37 am

Im in my 4th year of homeschooling, what specific questions do you have?


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