Architecture and public transport thread!

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FishStickNick
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16 Jan 2014, 12:10 am

Those buses are about a beautiful as buses get. The Unitrans bus system in the city of Davis, California has some old double-deck buses as part of its fleet:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unitrans



modcom77
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16 Jan 2014, 11:53 am

Here are some examples of Streamline Moderne architecture:

[img][800:1024]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6b/Club_Moderne,_Anaconda,_Montana.jpg/864px-Club_Moderne,_Anaconda,_Montana.jpg[/img]

[img][800:702]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/75/Cleveland_Greyhound.jpg/1280px-Cleveland_Greyhound.jpg[/img]

[img][800:500]http://www.valpo.edu/christopherchina/gallery/images/78opt.jpg[/img]

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The spire (not the antenna) atop the Empire State Building has some Streamline Moderne elements.

And yes, those buses are really nice looking.



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16 Jan 2014, 12:02 pm

Image

I have also been a fan of this building because of the sheer size of it and the fact that it just dominates the skyline. Yes, I know the Transamerica Pyramid is taller, but this one is a lot bigger. I also like the color of the granite.



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16 Jan 2014, 8:49 pm

modcom77 wrote:
Here are some examples of Streamline Moderne architecture:

[img][800:1024]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6b/Club_Moderne,_Anaconda,_Montana.jpg/864px-Club_Moderne,_Anaconda,_Montana.jpg[/img]

[img][800:702]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/75/Cleveland_Greyhound.jpg/1280px-Cleveland_Greyhound.jpg[/img]


I love things like these, even the cheaply-done and now dilapidated examples.

It might be a stretch, but maybe our tastes converge in this photo, the main stand/café at Enfield Town FC?

http://stuartnoel.files.wordpress.com/2 ... fisher.jpg (only given a hotlink due to its size)



modcom77
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16 Jan 2014, 9:05 pm

The brick is a bit out of place, but otherwise it looks good.



FishStickNick
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16 Jan 2014, 11:36 pm

This Safeway supermarket, believe it or not, is an architectural landmark of sorts.

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] ... otostream/



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17 Jan 2014, 1:24 am

Wow, a thread with two of my obsessions!

When I was in high school, my plan was to be an architect. That didn't work out so well, but I still love architecture.
I also love public transport, particularly rapid transit. When I went to london when I was 15, I spent a whole day just riding the subway there, just to ride the subway there.

Here's a building I did an elevation of, way back, 25 years ago. I dug it up and scanned it in a few parts then stitched the image together....

Image

I call it the "Pacific Trade Center", to be constructed in LA in the end of the 21st century.
over 12,000 feet tall. It's structure is essentially a cube, on it's corner, surrounded by support structure.
It's a "3" sided pyramid, with all faces 90 degrees from each other. A corner of a cube.
Kind of a Blade Runner feel to it, except much bigger.


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modcom77
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17 Jan 2014, 2:20 am

Pretty cool, although I feel it would be intimidating to a decent amount of people.


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17 Jan 2014, 11:35 am

I've found myself a fan of a lot of Raymond Loewy's work. http://www.theverge.com/2013/11/5/50680 ... ic-designs


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FishStickNick
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17 Jan 2014, 2:59 pm

Check out that artist's rendering of a monorail for Los Angeles.

http://paleofuture.gizmodo.com/nobody-w ... -512623502



modcom77
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17 Jan 2014, 3:29 pm

That's pretty cool looking. Los Angeles is just too much of a sprawl to have good public transit in my opinion.


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19 Jan 2014, 3:41 pm

Modcom, you speak my language!

Do people where you are still hate it when someone brings up the Embarcadero Freeway? Or I-238's numbering?


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modcom77
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19 Jan 2014, 3:42 pm

I can't say whether or not people hate I-238, but I do know people still dislike the Embarcadero Freeway.


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19 Jan 2014, 3:48 pm

The deal with I-238 was that it according to the Interstate Highway numbering system, it should be an offshoot from an I-38. But there is no I-38. It was upgraded to an interstate highway in the 80s, and it was already a state highway 238.

Don't even get people started on I-99 (in Pennsylvania).


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19 Jan 2014, 3:50 pm

Interesting. I actually never knew what those numbers meant.


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19 Jan 2014, 4:22 pm

For me (as my avatar suggests), I've been fascinated with the London Underground - big and full of history. Hundreds of stations, each with personality - many were built in different era by different (often competing) companies, and each company had its own distinct style. Sub-surface stations are not always completely "underground" - many were built with openings in the tunnels to allow smoke to escape during the steam era. Tube stations and lines actually follow the path of streets above because during the time of construction, it was cheaper to bore directly under the streets instead of purchasing the rights to dig under buildings - Many stations are curved, resulting in uneven spacing between the train and platform, leading to the famous "Mind the Gap" warning, and a lot of stations found use as bomb shelters during World War II. Other metro systems may be bigger, newer, cleaner, or more efficient, but London is the one that captured my fascination.

Image
Many stations on the Northern line were built in this style

Image
Some station buildings had other buildings built on top. This is a similar design, but I believe it might have been built by a different company.

Image
Many of the older "tube" stations each had their own unique tile pattern, most likely intended to make it easier for commuters to recognize the different stations. (By the way, someone needs to turn that access panel around on the platform so that the tiles match up)

Image
Until a few years ago (before being taken over by the London Overground), a LU line ran through the Thames Tunnel, one of the first tunnels under a navigable river (opened in 1843). It was first built as a pedestrian tunnel, but was later converted to railway use.


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