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lunaseesstars
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30 Apr 2014, 5:41 pm

Hi Everyone,

I am looking for some information please. I plan to make an appointment to discuss with my GP if it is possible if i can be referred for assessment in hope of a diagnosis. I plan to take my print out my score for the AQ test, EQ test and a a print out of autism traits in females with ticks beside which ones my family and I feel I meet from help4aspergers

I am really anxious about even making this appointment, i'm really scared that I may come across as a hypochondriac. :?

Any advice or information any of you could give to help with how to go about getting a diagnosis or what information i should take to my GP and even what to say to my GP would really appreciated!



GreyMatter
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01 May 2014, 6:00 am

lunaseesstars wrote:
Hi Everyone,

I am looking for some information please. I plan to make an appointment to discuss with my GP if it is possible if i can be referred for assessment in hope of a diagnosis. I plan to take my print out my score for the AQ test, EQ test and a a print out of autism traits in females with ticks beside which ones my family and I feel I meet from help4aspergers

I am really anxious about even making this appointment, i'm really scared that I may come across as a hypochondriac. :?

Any advice or information any of you could give to help with how to go about getting a diagnosis or what information i should take to my GP and even what to say to my GP would really appreciated!


Tell him about the areas in life where you have problems and that you think it could stem from a neurological problem such as autism or ADHD and that you hope to investigate it.

If you do not actually experience any problems then don't waste time getting a diagnosis. I'm serious. I ended up getting an adult diagnosis because I experienced problems that I could not resolve. The diagnosis helped me understand the root cause of my problems and how to employ coping strategies. Other than that, the diagnosis has not helped me; if anything it made things worse.



binaryodes
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05 May 2014, 3:23 pm

In the Uk the process is as follows

GP
GP referral
Clinical psychologist
Referral
ASD Specialist
Diagnosis

I was sent the EQ and AQ tests also. Just dont tell any psychologist that you think that you have Aspergers/ADHD. Hopefully the doctor will make all the relevant referral notes, but my experience is that psychologists will shut you down immediately if you suggest a condition. Ive had this twice. Just tell them your impairments in the main areas

Social
Executive
Sensory
Rigidity


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Logan5
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11 May 2014, 3:44 pm

Some of the information in the following old thread may also be helpful:
"Guidance for UK Assessment & Diagnosis through the NHS"
http://www.wrongplanet.net/postt227311.html



AsciiSmoke
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12 May 2014, 7:27 am

Where about in the country are you? I'm in the south / south-east so I come under the Surrey and Borders Partnership for NHS.

I only ask because I had to get a second opinion and I can recommend a wonderfully patient and very capable psychologist.


For me, I had an assessment which was referred through my GP. However, the assessment came back as 'close, but negative'. It turns out, after reading the report, that this was because I was unable to switch off my NT cloaking device. I'm so used to trying to respond appropriately and keep my answers short and on the point that I failed to recognize that the assessor was reading my body language and the way I answered questions as much as taking note of the answers themselves.

I also spent far too much time visualizing and researching what the assessment would be like so that I didn't get overwhelmed on the day. That meant I was far more relaxed than I would usually be in such unusual circumstances. It also probably didn't help that the assessment seemed like it was targeted at kids and teens who haven't had the benefit of my 33 years to learn how to appear normal.

After a few months of discussions and research with my GP and my family who, like me, were all convinced that the outcome was wrong, I arranged another assessment privately. I detailed my misgivings and ensured that the process was more gradual than a single interview on a single day. With far more information and an assessment that seemed more appropriate for a grown up, my second assessor had no problem giving me a diagnosis of Aspergers.

Since then, my life has slowly started to change for the better, I feel more free to share my feelings on the things that challenge me. Only though doing this can I find out what is and what isn't to do with the condition. There are so many things that I struggle with that I always thought were completely normal but which are actually caused by my autism. If I didn't have the diagnosis I never would have felt able to ask people if they have the same feelings. Now that I can recognize these challenges for what they are, I can finally give myself a break for being rubbish at them.



gypsy2522
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14 May 2014, 8:28 am

lunaseesstars wrote:



I am really anxious about even making this appointment, i'm really scared that I may come across as a hypochondriac. :?



I feel this way every time i go into my GP's room to talk to her about autism and about my referral (it's taking years to be seen, i'm on a really long waiting list).

When i first went to her about it, i was so scared and so nervous. I was shaking and sweating and my face felt hot and red. I couldn't even look at her, let alone in the eye. But she took it on board and sent off the referral. And i've seen other GP's who weren't so convinced of it and have had to go through all the stupid questions of why do i think i have autism :wall:

But then there's been other doctors and medical practitioners who had picked it up straight away.

So my advice is to be aware you might get a negative response or you might get a positive response, if it's negative, don't get disheartened or give up or even doubt yourself. Try talking to some other doctors who medical people. I was seen by a mental health assessor for the problems i have with anxiety and he even put on my report that in his opinion i have mild autism and need to be assessed properly.

Also depending on what area you live in, will mean the length you have to wait to be seen can vary. I've been waiting years and at the bottom of a waiting list :/ that's Surrey for you, but my friend in basingstoke got seen within a month or two and she considered that a long wait would you believe...

either way, don't worry (stupid thing to say i know) but try not to worry too much.



lunaseesstars
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15 May 2014, 5:10 pm

binaryodes wrote:
In the Uk the process is as follows

GP
GP referral
Clinical psychologist
Referral
ASD Specialist
Diagnosis

I was sent the EQ and AQ tests also. Just dont tell any psychologist that you think that you have Aspergers/ADHD. Hopefully the doctor will make all the relevant referral notes, but my experience is that psychologists will shut you down immediately if you suggest a condition. Ive had this twice. Just tell them your impairments in the main areas

Social
Executive
Sensory
Rigidity


Thank you for this info. I have had dealings with councillors/psychiatrist for my bipolar disorder/anxiety since I was 15. I haven't had the most positive experience myself and found psychiatrist to really not give a damn apart from supply heavy amounts of medication. Another reason why im so apprehensive is the mental health teams in Scotland are in short supply and they have a habit of dismissing things easily if they don't come under critical or emergency. After much thought Perhaps for now I'm better off just leaving it and trying to examine coping devices on my own. My anxiety levels hit the roof at the thought of dealing with more doctors.

Thanks for your replies everyone. I really appreciate it.



gypsy2522
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17 May 2014, 10:00 am

hm, i would suggest searching in your area for adult autism assessment, on google. Because some centres accept self-referrals, so basically means you don't have to talk to your GP :)



AutisticGuy1981
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17 May 2014, 8:56 pm

binaryodes wrote:
In the Uk the process is as follows

GP
GP referral
Clinical psychologist
Referral
ASD Specialist
Diagnosis
not for me.

GP
GP Refferal
Diagnosed after 2 hour interview with clinical psychologist and a nurse consultant who's chosen field was ASD.
Received the report about 6 months later..
GP Contacted adult services to inform them which he said he had to.
Some lady visited me at home asking me a bunch of questions and I never heard from them again.

gypsy2522 wrote:
hm, i would suggest searching in your area for adult autism assessment, on google. Because some centres accept self-referrals, so basically means you don't have to talk to your GP :)

Via GP should be free.

In the UK the above would probably be stupid money



gypsy2522
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18 May 2014, 5:55 am

nope it's free, a couple of my friends who are on the spectrum have done that. And it's simply just a form you fill out online on the clinics website. I did this myself when i was in the process of moving to cornwall, but had to cancel the referral because the move didn't go through.

Just check that they do nhs referrals.



12341234
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25 May 2014, 7:51 am

AsciiSmoke wrote:
Where about in the country are you? I'm in the south / south-east so I come under the Surrey and Borders Partnership for NHS.

I only ask because I had to get a second opinion and I can recommend a wonderfully patient and very capable psychologist.


For me, I had an assessment which was referred through my GP. However, the assessment came back as 'close, but negative'. It turns out, after reading the report, that this was because I was unable to switch off my NT cloaking device. I'm so used to trying to respond appropriately and keep my answers short and on the point that I failed to recognize that the assessor was reading my body language and the way I answered questions as much as taking note of the answers themselves.

I also spent far too much time visualizing and researching what the assessment would be like so that I didn't get overwhelmed on the day. That meant I was far more relaxed than I would usually be in such unusual circumstances. It also probably didn't help that the assessment seemed like it was targeted at kids and teens who haven't had the benefit of my 33 years to learn how to appear normal.

After a few months of discussions and research with my GP and my family who, like me, were all convinced that the outcome was wrong, I arranged another assessment privately. I detailed my misgivings and ensured that the process was more gradual than a single interview on a single day. With far more information and an assessment that seemed more appropriate for a grown up, my second assessor had no problem giving me a diagnosis of Aspergers.

Since then, my life has slowly started to change for the better, I feel more free to share my feelings on the things that challenge me. Only though doing this can I find out what is and what isn't to do with the condition. There are so many things that I struggle with that I always thought were completely normal but which are actually caused by my autism. If I didn't have the diagnosis I never would have felt able to ask people if they have the same feelings. Now that I can recognize these challenges for what they are, I can finally give myself a break for being rubbish at them.


Surrey & Borders ('Borders' part being NE Hampshire) are good at sending tertiary referrals to SLaM if they don't know what's wrong with you/need specialist intervention. Go to the next county down, and Sussex Partnership Trust is abysmal. I've always heard good things about SaBP.

Sussex Partnership refused to send me for an ASC referral, however, when I went back to London, I spoke with Bexley PCT's Mental Health Commissioner and got straight onto Oxleas - the statutory MH / LD service, and only waited two months for a confirmed DX.

In the cities, it's good; in the sticks provisions for DX-ing, inspite of the Autism Act 2009. is poor.

I am now in SLaM-Land and get even more help being under South-London and Maudsley Trust. Knowing what I know now, I avoid outside-of-London health 'professionals' 'cause in both Kent and Sussex, have all been awful!



hm76
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27 May 2014, 2:24 pm

I had a similar experience in Sussex, had a phone chat first from the doctor who decided it was worth having a face to face appointment, went to that at which I told him lots of personal info which was somewhat scary and embarrassing. Was told I would be referred but it would take a while then was called up at work by a lady from the trust who said I was not a priority as they had paranoid schizophrenics to treat. Also was asked why a diagnosis would benefit me. Told her that I had always had certain issues, especially from a social angle many of which had continued at work despite my efforts to improve the situation, had done an online test (not saying these are always accurate) which said it was very likely that I had it plus had been anorexic and depressed as a teenager much of which was due to these issues looking back. Said that I didn't mind when the appointment was but would just like to know. Put the phone down then was sent a letter a week later saying that they would not give me a diagnosis as I was obviously managing well but enclosed a leaflet for a centre in the local area for support and this I am rarely able to attend as I work full time. Think I am going to complain even if it is ignored as I pay taxes and had it been a physical condition or even depression would have had better treatment. Also this idea that it doesn't matter as you have learnt to cope is questionable, adults with dyslexia are probably not told this plus I am 34 and will be working for many years yet. Has anyone complained and if so did it get you anywhere?



12341234
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
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28 May 2014, 3:11 pm

Check PMs



Last edited by 12341234 on 30 May 2014, 1:14 am, edited 1 time in total.

hm76
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28 May 2014, 5:29 pm

Thanks for this, that's very helpful. I'll send you a pm tomorrow when I am a little more awake!



MrGrumpy
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30 May 2014, 12:37 pm

Hi - I have been posting on the general forum at the top of the list, and have only just noticed this forum further down the page.

This particular thread pretty well covers all the things I have experienced with the UK National Health Service, and I would like to try to summarise as follows...

1. The NHS appears to have no standard procedure for dealing with previously undiagnosed adult ASD (child ASD is dealt with by the education services).
2. The medical profession does not take kindly to patients asking for a confirmation of a self-diagnosis, despite the fact that it is a characteristic of adult ASD that sufferers will have taken the trouble to do a lot of painstaking research before plucking up the courage to talk to a doctor about it.
3. Because adult ASD sufferers have done so much research, they are reluctant to be told that they are mistaken, and will continue to search for a 'positive' diagnosis.
4. The criteria and the methods which are used in the process of diagnosis vary widely between different professionals, and it is therefore usually possible for an ASD sufferer to eventually find the diagnosis which they want.
5. But the bottom line is that if you have made it into adulthood without any assistance from any of the various health and welfare departments, then you are unlikely to get any practical benefit from a 'positive' diagnosis.
6. If and when you eventually receive a 'positive' diagnosis, you will experience a huge sense of relief because you have finally found someone who will give you a piece of paper confirming what you knew all along.
7. But you will very soon find out that the diagnosis has changed nothing - you are still the same person as before, with all the same problems.

I seriously believe that a self-diagnosis is all you need - nobody can prove you wrong, and if it provides an explanation of the way you are, then why look any further?



AutisticGuy1981
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31 May 2014, 4:20 am

a GP should not be blocking a referral because they are not qualified to give an opinion. they should be sending you along the chain.

find out who is capable of assessing adults in your area via googling for autism specialist units within the NHS and NHS trust and make your GP aware of them.

My GP had exactly no idea of what he should do but asked colleagues in that field for advice, I'm expect a lot of GP's have no clue about adult diagnosis either and just try to fob you off like inept idiots rather than admit they don't know what to do.