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wblastyn
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02 May 2014, 8:21 pm

After two failed attempts to get a degree (had to leave due to anxiety), I've decided to try and turn my interest with computers into a job.

What's the best way to secure a job in IT without a degree? I was thinking of teaching myself the basics and getting the comptia a+ certificate and maybe trying to get on an apprenticeship.



AardvarkGoodSwimmer
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02 May 2014, 10:36 pm

When I looked for a C++ job in the U.S. in 2000, it seemed like most of the company HR departments focused overwhelmingly on amount and time of corporate experience.

Other people have had more positive experiences. There are also skills of viewing HR as merely one track. For example, find the name of an actual hiring manager, call him or her and introduce yourself briefly and matter-of-factly, and then perhaps ask, 'I've already sent a copy of my resume to HR. May I send you a copy also?'



wblastyn
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03 May 2014, 6:48 pm

That's a great idea thanks! Problem is I'm not sure where I should begin, or even what area of IT I should go into (tech support, software development, etc). Any pointers would be great! :)



MissDorkness
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04 May 2014, 1:11 am

I tried transferring to IT at my old company.

Just about impossible.

Ended up in an IT role that is more niche. I needed a BS, but, not any certifications.



win2mac
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04 May 2014, 7:10 am

Why not contribute into some opensource project like linux kernel, coreboot(=opensource bios replacement) etc..
Later you can use it as reference in your CV.

But don't try to be "girl for everything". If you enjoy low-level programming in assembly language stick with that.