Welcome to UKIPland- a nightmare vision of future britain

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thomas81
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26 May 2014, 1:21 pm

Yep.

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Imagine the Prime Minister?s bulletproof Daimler pulling up outside No 10 and out steps Nigel Farage.

The purple-faced PM?s a little unsteady on his feet after a boozy lunch in the City.

Bankers wanted to thank their wide boy chum turned patron for his gift of a whacking tax cut for Britain?s millionaires.

Farage was happy to be among friends in the City because it isn?t going well.

Patients are besieging hospitals after the wholesale privatisation of the NHS was an expensive disaster.

Imposing a charge to visit a GP proved costly when people didn?t and minor complaints developed into life-threatening illnesses.

Then there are the low paid workers furious after Ukip let bosses scrap paid holidays.

And new mums are in tears after maternity rights were abolished so they must be back at work the week after giving birth.

Quitting the European Union isn?t the picnic Farage mis-sold to voters.

Unemployment?s soared since Nissan, Toyota and Honda announced they wouldn?t invest another penny in Britain.

US President Barack Obama skipping Britain on his trip to Europe was bad enough.

But the leaders of Brazil, China and India? Their preferring Brussels to London was hard to take.

Holidaymakers are miffed too now they?ve lost cheaper mobile calls from the poolside in Spain.

Probably just as well they?re not going to Magaluf this year. The queues for reintroduced passport checks are unbearable.

Banning other Europeans coming to Britain no longer sounds great when thousands of Brits returned from Spain to shout at our waiters.

Crime?s up after handguns were reintroduced and the armed guard at the gates of Downing Street had to be doubled.

Chelsea fans hurled only insults when Farage?s Daimler sped in; limiting Premiership teams to three foreign players saw Eden Hazard?s departure and stranded Thibaut Courtois at Atletico.

Imposing dress codes in restaurants sparked a social backlash after a brickie was informed ?Sorry Sir, you can?t come in here. You?re an oik? on a night out with his missus.

Taxi drivers are no longer laughing after a tie and shirt was made compulsory.

I?ve read the last Ukip election manifesto.

Welcome to Ukipland, a nastier country.


http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/we ... in-3610179


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Pobbles
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26 May 2014, 1:33 pm

Problem not just confined to the UK. Greece, and France also.

Russia at the gates...


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thomas81
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26 May 2014, 1:38 pm

Pobbles wrote:
Problem not just confined to the UK. Greece, and France also.

Russia at the gates...


Indeed. The situation in France scares me the most.

All things considered, i think Britain got off lightly with Farage and his Tesco-smart price BNP.

The Socialist Party did well in Ireland, which is a consolation.


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Jacoby
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26 May 2014, 1:52 pm

Perhaps I'm speaking out of turn but I don't really understand the worry about losing influence, the UK still has one of the world's largest economies and powerful military. There is an 'Anglosphere' which it shares linguistic and cultural heritage with, there is their Commonwealth on top of that as well. Being independent would mean they would have to negotiate whatever directly rather than some supernational union that you don't have any controlling interest in.



Pobbles
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26 May 2014, 1:53 pm

I had a feeling that we'd be one step closer to fascism after a few years under Cameron. Not that the buck stops with the Conservatives, Cameron wouldn't even be in the job if Labour hadn't scored a hat-trick of muppets for leaders.

I may actually have to get off my arse and vote for the first time in my life. Shame there's nobody to vote for.


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thomas81
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26 May 2014, 1:58 pm

Jacoby wrote:
Perhaps I'm speaking out of turn but I don't really understand the worry about losing influence, the UK still has one of the world's largest economies and powerful military. There is an 'Anglosphere' which it shares linguistic and cultural heritage with, there is their Commonwealth on top of that as well. Being independent would mean they would have to negotiate whatever directly rather than some supernational union that you don't have any controlling interest in.


Allow me to explain in a more American friendly way.

If the UK leaves the EU, it will become to the EU what Mexico is to the USA.

Better to be within the pool of wealth than cut ourselves off from the teat entirely.


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Jacoby
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26 May 2014, 2:11 pm

thomas81 wrote:
Jacoby wrote:
Perhaps I'm speaking out of turn but I don't really understand the worry about losing influence, the UK still has one of the world's largest economies and powerful military. There is an 'Anglosphere' which it shares linguistic and cultural heritage with, there is their Commonwealth on top of that as well. Being independent would mean they would have to negotiate whatever directly rather than some supernational union that you don't have any controlling interest in.


Allow me to explain in a more American friendly way.

If the UK leaves the EU, it will become to the EU what Mexico is to the USA.

Better to be within the pool of wealth than cut ourselves off from the teat entirely.


That's a pretty silly comparison as Mexico is a horribly corrupt 3rd world country bordering a superpower. What Canada is to us would probably be a better comparison but I like Canada and it's not as good for dramatic effect.



thomas81
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26 May 2014, 2:19 pm

Jacoby wrote:
thomas81 wrote:
Jacoby wrote:
Perhaps I'm speaking out of turn but I don't really understand the worry about losing influence, the UK still has one of the world's largest economies and powerful military. There is an 'Anglosphere' which it shares linguistic and cultural heritage with, there is their Commonwealth on top of that as well. Being independent would mean they would have to negotiate whatever directly rather than some supernational union that you don't have any controlling interest in.


Allow me to explain in a more American friendly way.

If the UK leaves the EU, it will become to the EU what Mexico is to the USA.

Better to be within the pool of wealth than cut ourselves off from the teat entirely.


That's a pretty silly comparison as Mexico is a horribly corrupt 3rd world country bordering a superpower. What Canada is to us would probably be a better comparison but I like Canada and it's not as good for dramatic effect.


Canada thrives not because of its proximity to the USA or because of its independence but because of its non-american attitudes towards things like universal healthcare and other socially protective legislation that the USA lacks.

UKIP wants to reverse the national ownership of our industries and health sector. They are about expediting the accumulation of wealth away from the poorest to the richest. All of which will only serve to penalise the poorest brits and in the long run our collective development will suffer.


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26 May 2014, 3:28 pm

^^^^^^Yep. When the right wing want us to compete, it's not with Canada or Sweden or Germany, it's with Mexico, or China.

Channel 4 News tweeted this earlier:

Quote:
YouGov poll for #c4news finds four in five Ukip voters believe the UK of 20/30 years ago was a better place to raise children. Do you agree?


Which is possibly going in the next OED to define 'a bitter f*****g irony'. Let's turn back the effects of neoliberalism by ramping up the neoliberalism, but cutting back on the foreigners.


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Tequila
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26 May 2014, 3:50 pm

thomas81 wrote:
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/welcome-ukipland-nightmare-vision-britain-3610179


Funny enough, there are an awful lot of ex-Labour voters out there that like our vision of an independent Britain. They're not in with all this political correctness stuff, and they want to feel as though they have paid their stamp and that they come first. They want Britain to be proud and prosperous. They want nothing to do with fascist bigotry, and UKIP would suffer if we were ever seen to have sympathies with the far-right. That's why the BNP suffered - they were too extremist and racist. Their racism and their lack of coherence killed them. British people don't like that - fundamentally, we're a fair-minded lot and this is reflected in UKIP thinking. They mostly don't see that racism in UKIP.

The views of the Daily Mirror and those of their actual readership are very different, as I have said. Many of them sympathise with leaving the EU, even if for whatever reason they wouldn't vote for us.

The Daily Mirror is scared. They should be. The views of the metropolitan elite are under attack from the people of Britain, from a wide range of people, both from the traditional left and right.

I'm toasting our victories and hoping for many more as we advance in our cause to take back control.



Last edited by Tequila on 26 May 2014, 3:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Tequila
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26 May 2014, 3:51 pm

Pobbles wrote:
I may actually have to get off my arse and vote for the first time in my life. Shame there's nobody to vote for.


That depends on where you are on the political spectrum and what your issues are.

If you're ultra-left, you could vote for the Greens or the socialists if they are standing in your constituency.



visagrunt
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26 May 2014, 3:53 pm

I think a few things bear noting:

First, the European elections are no predictor of a general election. First of all, only about a third of Britons bothered to vote; and European elections tend to bring out far more protest vote. If we look at the performance of UKIP in the local elections that were held in some parts of England, we see a truer picture of what might happen next year.

Second, UKIP's performance on Thursday was not actually that brilliant. They certainly ate into the two major parties votes--taking euroskeptic votes from both the right and left. But it was the LibDems who were hurt the worst--not by anything that UKIP did, but rather by their own decision to enter into a coalition and become part of the Government, rather that serving on the Opposition benches and holding the balance of power in a hung Parliament. Clegg might have legitimately believed that he could do more good as a deputy PM in a Conservative led government than he could have in holding the balance of power on a budget vote, but I'm not at all sure about that--and I think a lot of LIbDem voters in the "protest vote" camp were left with little other choice than UKIP.

Third, in a First-Past-the-Post system, UKIP are hopelessly handicapped. Their constituency is diffuse--scattered across all parts of Britain, and it isn't cohesive, drawing from conservatives and socialists alike. The issues at hand in a national election are not going to be focused on Europe--they are going to be focused on the economy; on interest rates and housing prices; on employment and benefits. Immigration issues will present some wedge, but likely not enough to translate a UKIP vote into anything other than a watering down of the margins required for the main parties to take the marginals.

The prospect of Farage leading UKIP to anything beyond a scattering of seats in Westminster appears to be remote in the extreme. What would be far more interesting is if the Conservatives can reverse some of the rot that seems to be apparent in their support, and pull off a hung Parliament in which both the LibDems and UKIP might have some influence.


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26 May 2014, 4:24 pm

visagrunt wrote:
I think a few things bear noting:

First, the European elections are no predictor of a general election. First of all, only about a third of Britons bothered to vote; and European elections tend to bring out far more protest vote. If we look at the performance of UKIP in the local elections that were held in some parts of England, we see a truer picture of what might happen next year.

Whilst I agree with you on every point, I don't think the locals are indicative of too much either. As they were held simultaneously with the European elections, they were biased towards UKIP.

Only a third of the country voted, and only about a third of them voted UKIP. 1 in 9 people, therefore, are UKIP voters. Most of the others are strongly anti-UKIP. In FPTP, they'll suffer a lot, unless they manage to gain huge popular support in a constituency or two like the Greens did in Brighton Pavillion (probably thanks to Farage running there).



Pobbles
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26 May 2014, 4:29 pm

Tequila wrote:
Pobbles wrote:
I may actually have to get off my arse and vote for the first time in my life. Shame there's nobody to vote for.


That depends on where you are on the political spectrum and what your issues are.

If you're ultra-left, you could vote for the Greens or the socialists if they are standing in your constituency.


A vote for the Greens in any constituency is a wasted vote.

I'm not sure where I am on the political spectrum, but I'm pretty sure I can spot a twat when I see one. I wouldn't put Nigel Farage (however you pronounce it) in charge of a school netball team.

This isn't to say that the elected leadership of the traditional parties aren't twats.


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26 May 2014, 5:15 pm

Tequila wrote:
thomas81 wrote:
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/welcome-ukipland-nightmare-vision-britain-3610179


Funny enough, there are an awful lot of ex-Labour voters out there that like our vision of an independent Britain. They're not in with all this political correctness stuff, and they want to feel as though they have paid their stamp and that they come first. They want Britain to be proud and prosperous. They want nothing to do with fascist bigotry, and UKIP would suffer if we were ever seen to have sympathies with the far-right. That's why the BNP suffered - they were too extremist and racist. Their racism and their lack of coherence killed them. British people don't like that - fundamentally, we're a fair-minded lot and this is reflected in UKIP thinking. They mostly don't see that racism in UKIP.

The views of the Daily Mirror and those of their actual readership are very different, as I have said. Many of them sympathise with leaving the EU, even if for whatever reason they wouldn't vote for us.

The Daily Mirror is scared. They should be. The views of the metropolitan elite are under attack from the people of Britain, from a wide range of people, both from the traditional left and right.

I'm toasting our victories and hoping for many more as we advance in our cause to take back control.


A few pressing questions, if you would:

What policies draw the ex-labour voters, anti-EU and immigration concerns aside?

How will UKIP make the UK a country to be proud of?

How will UKIP make the UK prosperous?

Who are the 'metropolitan elite'? What are their views?

What do UKIP want to do when they have control?

Thanks.


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Of course, it's probably quite a bit more complicated than that.

You know sometimes, between the dames and the horses, I don't even know why I put my hat on.