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khaoz
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29 May 2014, 10:05 am

What people say is not always what they are. I really don't believe as many politicians are Christian as they say. I think politicians know they don't stand much of a chance getting elected if they don't at least say they like the circus,and perform the ritual of showing up in church once in a while.

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/20 ... president/



Kraichgauer
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29 May 2014, 2:29 pm

I actually have more concern about a President being an intolerant, legalistic evangelical than I am about him being an atheist, or an adherent of another religion.


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Tim_Tex
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29 May 2014, 10:49 pm

For the records, all but three presidents were mainline Protestants (JFK was Catholic, Carter and Clinton are Baptists)


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Kraichgauer
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30 May 2014, 12:33 am

Tim_Tex wrote:
For the records, all but three presidents were mainline Protestants (JFK was Catholic, Carter and Clinton are Baptists)


And most of those mainliners have been for the most part a decent bunch. As for our Baptist Presidents, Carter had fallen out of favor with his own church for his policies, while Clinton had never had their support.


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kraftiekortie
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30 May 2014, 8:17 am

Most presidents might have been mainline Protestants--but faith in religion varies.

It is pretty well assumed that many of the early presidents were Deists (or perhaps even agnostic or atheist, in a time when such sentiments would have probably precluded them from pursuing public office). They believed, in essence, that God created the world, then withdrew from human affairs, letting us humans fight it out amongst ourselves.



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30 May 2014, 9:59 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
Most presidents might have been mainline Protestants--but faith in religion varies.

It is pretty well assumed that many of the early presidents were Deists (or perhaps even agnostic or atheist, in a time when such sentiments would have probably precluded them from pursuing public office). They believed, in essence, that God created the world, then withdrew from human affairs, letting us humans fight it out amongst ourselves.


That is absolutely correct. Funny, with all the deification of the founders among the far right today, most of them wouldn't pass the right's mustard test to even get the right's nomination.


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Basso53
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31 May 2014, 10:13 pm

Kraichgauer wrote:
kraftiekortie wrote:
Most presidents might have been mainline Protestants--but faith in religion varies.

It is pretty well assumed that many of the early presidents were Deists (or perhaps even agnostic or atheist, in a time when such sentiments would have probably precluded them from pursuing public office). They believed, in essence, that God created the world, then withdrew from human affairs, letting us humans fight it out amongst ourselves.


That is absolutely correct. Funny, with all the deification of the founders among the far right today, most of them wouldn't pass the right's mustard test to even get the right's nomination.


Roughly a third of the delegates to the constitutional convention were Freemasons. Jefferson was probably the most prominent Deist of his day, and after his Presidency, one of his major literary efforts was the Jefferson Bible, which basically did away with any mention of Jesus' divinity. George Washington was the highest degree Freemason, and wore his Master Mason apron when he laid the cornerstone for the US Capitol. While he was nominally an Anglican and regularly attended services, it is said that he never took communion and would leave services just before that part of it began. There were also a fair number of Unitarians among the founding fathers. Franklin is often erroneously thought to have been a Quaker. He was raised a Congregationalist, but in later life, he attended a wide variety of services, and was a benefactor of one of the first Jewish synagogues in Philadelphia.


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