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Morgana
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04 Aug 2014, 9:51 am

I believe it was Tony Atwood who said that Aspies often find themselves in jobs that they are overqualified to do, or jobs that aren't challenging enough for their skill level, due to lack of social skills. This makes sense, since so much seems to be reliant on "networking"- (something I can't do at all!) For awhile now I've been feeling overqualified and unchallenged in my work, but unfortunately, since I need to spend so much time doing it in order to earn money, I often feel frustrated and wish I had more time for other things. What's particularly upsetting is seeing people who are less qualified doing the things that I'd like to do.

Anybody else have this problem? If so, how do you handle it? (I realize there probably isn't much actual advice anyone can give me: my social networking skills are not going to just "get better". I'm more interested in how many others have this problem, and how you deal with it psychologically, for instance. Of course any practical advice is welcome too).


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kraftiekortie
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04 Aug 2014, 10:07 am

It's rather common for Aspies, despite having Bachelor's (or even higher) degrees, to be working in retail or clerical jobs. I have a Bachelor's Degree, and I've worked in clerical jobs all my working life.

Then again, in this economy, working in these jobs have become common, overall, for people with degrees.



League_Girl
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04 Aug 2014, 10:46 am

To me, just as long as I have a job, it's good enough. I have no college degree and I blame it on my learning disability.


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MissDorkness
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04 Aug 2014, 11:28 am

I experienced that feeling A LOT in my last job.

I'd see people with no experience or with no clue be assigned to roles. So, first off, I'd feel disdain for their bosses for being clueless enough to give them cool work then I'd be frustrated when I was doing a bunch of menial tasks a monkey could've done... ;) but, then I realized, at least I was doing those menial tasks down in the dark basement with the engineers, rather than in one of the bright and busy offices with a lot of traffic through them.

It was pretty much an up and down for me. Sometimes it really got to me, especially when I saw someone struggling with something I would've found easy, but, ~shrugs~ I tried to bite back the bitterness.

(I actually tried to transfer out of my job for over seven years, internal and then finally external... kinda shocked when it finally worked... I'd blown opportunities too many times I was almost giving up hope.)

Morgana wrote:
I believe it was Tony Atwood who said that Aspies often find themselves in jobs that they are overqualified to do, or jobs that aren't challenging enough for their skill level, due to lack of social skills. This makes sense, since so much seems to be reliant on "networking"- (something I can't do at all!) For awhile now I've been feeling overqualified and unchallenged in my work, but unfortunately, since I need to spend so much time doing it in order to earn money, I often feel frustrated and wish I had more time for other things. What's particularly upsetting is seeing people who are less qualified doing the things that I'd like to do.

Anybody else have this problem? If so, how do you handle it? (I realize there probably isn't much actual advice anyone can give me: my social networking skills are not going to just "get better". I'm more interested in how many others have this problem, and how you deal with it psychologically, for instance. Of course any practical advice is welcome too).



hmk66
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21 Feb 2015, 3:36 am

I had a similar situation. I think - working at a school - I can answer external telephone calls from parents, from colleagues from other locations and other people, when the nearby colleague that works near me has gone to home. She has shorter working times than I have.

Then she went home, but after that the telephone was ringing. It is not my job to answer it, nor does my boss want to answer it. The next day the boss came to this colleague, complaining that nobody can reach the school by phone. I kept my mouth shut instead of saying: "If she is away, I could answer it." It is clear to me, that when the colleague is away, the boss tries to find someone to answer the phone, but consciously skips me. I think there is no reason to skip me.



Aniihya
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24 Feb 2015, 10:35 am

My last job was underchallenging. It was just maintenancing an outdated IBM system, entering data into the system via data sheets and creating Excel files based on that information. My two year contract ended and since the pay was low and raises were only inflation adjusted (3%), I didn't extend my contract. Had they at least offered a Christmas bonus and vacation pay like most German companies do, I would have maybe considered a little while longer, however the environment was horrible (unsympathetic boss, mobbing, pessimistic colleagues, hypocrites). If I find a new job, I hope it is challenging and that I get my own room (even if it is compact as long as I do not have to hear an obnoxious woman talking loud from across the room and a colleague telling sex jokes all the time).



JosefK
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25 Feb 2015, 5:03 pm

I recognize a lot of the above. I have temporarily interrupted my studies (with half a year left of my master's degree) because of intense sensory overload. I have moved back in with my parents because of my difficulties. I have been working for years in a so-called distribution center, in which I basically try to keep the piles of products in stock. This job, while providing me with some income, is not challenging at all. Since I have been too obsessed with my studies, and not with networking, I am currently experiencing difficulties with getting a job that fits my interests (mainly literature, philosophy, writing and journalism). I do not look down upon menial labor or anything, but I feel that my talents could be put to better use.
I have looked down upon 'networking' for a long time, but I now experience that opportunism does not necessarily exclude being one's authentic self. My frustration has been mounting for some weeks now, because, despite my intellectual capabilities, other internships/jobs continually go to older more 'experienced' candidates. I have not that much work experience, and feel humiliated every time I get rejected, because I am sure I am a lot more intelligent than my competitors. Yet my competitors probably have been more active in the networking area, and probably possess more marketable 'skills' than I do. My advice would therefore be to start on a small scale with some networking: ask your friends or relatives that you are looking for a job, and maybe they will eventually bring you into contact with a potential employer. Emphasize your strengths, downplay your weaknesses/difficulties (in job interviews etc) , be proactive and open-minded. Notwithstanding the long waits between job interviews (torture and anxiety), continual self-doubt, and the intensely humiliating feeling of being rejected (again), one has to find the strength to learn from these experiences (what can I do better on the next job interview? What were these people looking for in a new employee, and how could I work to fit that profile while staying true to my unique skills).



carthago
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27 Feb 2015, 2:57 am

Sometimes it's not about being an aspie, but just the economy or your timing.
There was an economics study published a few years ago that found if you graduate during an economic recession, then it takes 10 years to reach income parity with people who graduate in better economic times. This is because you start lower on the corporate ladder and have more rungs to climb.
Also, sometimes it's an issue of personal branding. Careers require a bit of strategic planning. When should you go back to get an advanced degree or an MBA? 2 years, 5 years, or 10 years then just get an EMBA or PhD? Some fields prefer younger faces--they won't say this, but it's definitely the case if you're entering big law, public accounting, investment banking, or other fields that burn the midnight oil. It's not politically correct, but that's how it is. If you've been in a particular job for too long, have too much work history in an unrelated field, have a personal branding issue, graduate off cycle or in a down swing, then you might just miss that train.
There are aspie-specific problems too, but that's just to say, there's a lot to consider. Also, aspies usually do well to mezzanine (ie. jump over) middle-skilled jobs by continuing to more advanced degrees.