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RightGalaxy
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28 Aug 2014, 6:28 pm

My son (15) likes to play basketball and had another phantom foot pain in an area that was x-rayed as being clear of any fractures, etc... His doctor said that this may be a neuro problem.
An hour after this happened, my nephew comes from the locker room area saying that my son is having another "autistic episode". He describes my son as stimming (flapping) and vocalizing unintelligible sounds. After this, my son emerges cleaned, dressed and his usual charming self.
My nephew refers to this behavior as an "episode" because my son does this very rarely. He coined the phase after reading about psychotic episodes in a magazine. Could my son possibly be exibiting a neurological disease and not asperger's?? Maybe both? Any experiences with this?
Thanks.



kraftiekortie
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28 Aug 2014, 6:37 pm

Especially if you have decent health insurance, you should take him to a neurologist. Make sure you know whether the neurologist requires referrals.

Talk to your nephew again, and your son. Tell them to describe EXACTLY what happened. And that there's no shame in what happened; you just want to get to the bottom of it.



Waterfalls
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28 Aug 2014, 6:59 pm

While it could be a serious problem needing treatment, it could also be that the minor issues that occur with vigorous activity where you suddenly hurt are shockingly intense to your son, who I take it has AS? Maybe to calmly ask what he feels? Just as external experiences (light, sound) feel intense, so can internal experiences.



postcards57
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29 Aug 2014, 3:01 pm

Meltdowns can look different in different kids, too. Being overstimulated or stressed could certainly be followed by stimming or an anxiety attack. On the other hand, epilepsy is a fairly common co-morbidity.
J.