I see humans as pets...and why this attitude is good

Page 3 of 3 [ 32 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3

Skilpadde
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator

User avatar

Joined: 7 Dec 2008
Age: 42
Gender: Female
Posts: 27,151

18 Oct 2014, 3:47 am

VioletYoshi wrote:
Even though Elliot wasn't diagnosed with Autism, we as a community should be concerned that it was likely he had it, and not dismiss behavior from others on the spectrum as a way of fighting bigotry.

I am not responsible for the behavior of anyone else, no matter what type of group we both belong to. As an aspie I'm not responsible for what Rodgers did, just like as a Norwegian I am not responsible for the actions of Anders Behring Breivik.
Of course aspies come in all shades of grey, from naive to murderer. It'd be weird if we didn't. Suffering from a disorder or a disease doesn't mean anything more than the fact you have that diagnosis. No one with any kind of diagnosis is responsible for the actions of anyone else, no matter how much they have in common.

VioletYoshi wrote:
I think most of the discrimination we face is from the stance that those on the Autism spectrum should only be understood and never criticized. If we want acceptance it starts with respecting that other people have a right to tell us no.

I sort of agree here. Sort of...

I agree that aspies are generally more interested in being understood and not criticized. But there is a reason for that. And that is that we experience that NTs think we should be criticized rather than understood. That's something we see a lot, to say nothing of a lot of double standards we endure from the general public and the experts alike. Ideally we should be criticized when necessary and understood when needed. But that's not the treatment we get, so it comes as no surprise that aspies as a group will rather demand than compromise.

Instead of being equals we're on the outside looking in, and NTs reject and avoid us, and we resent them, and we are blunt and direct, which is misunderstood so then they resent us, and we equally look down on each other. They don't understand us and we don't understand them (although NTs can fail to understand NTs too, and aspies don't magically understand all aspies, so it seems no one understands anyone). NTs are like the national majority that thinks every minority should adapt but fails to understand that some at least will need help and that not everyone can adapt as much as they both would wish, while aspies are a minority that demands society at large change for their benefit. Both camps fail to see beyond themselves and fail to find a middle ground.

Sigh... People are taxing.


I am talking in broad strokes here, so no one needs feel offended or tell me "I don't do this or that".

And yeah, of course people have the right to tell someone else no.


_________________
To those who are complaining about the quarantine period and curfews, just remember that your grandparents were called to war, you are being called to sit on the couch and watch Netflix. You can do this.

Always be yourself unless you can be a turtle
Then always be a turtle

“When the green hills are covered with talking wires and the wolves no longer sing, what good will the money you paid for our land be then” ― Chief Seattle


ImAnAspie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Oct 2013
Gender: Female
Posts: 7,686
Location: Erra (RA 03 45 12.5 Dec +24 28 02)

19 Oct 2014, 1:34 am

I vary between thinking of humans as being humans, mindless automatons and God's little naive children.

If I happen to be out in public and the 'automaton' thing happens, I feel even more dissociated from the human race than usual. It's almost scary. Walking amongst a bunch of mindless, dead robots. If the 'God's little naive children' feeling comes over me, I can feel very sorry and concerned for them.

Oh, and sometimes I think of them as little naive creatures, like rodents.


_________________


Your Aspie score: 151 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 60 of 200

Formally diagnosed in 2007.

Learn the simple joy of being satisfied with little, rather than always wanting more.