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computerlove
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21 Mar 2007, 3:37 am

Hi people, been lately thinking about reducing amounts of gluten/caseine ingestion,
and was thinking that I like to have cereal or sandwiches for dinner, and I'd like
some ideas or tips for alternatives to these.

thanks :D


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BenJ
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21 Mar 2007, 3:48 am

eat gf bread for your sandwiches. Experiment with different types. I personally like to toast it best.

GF pastas and noodles can be nice, give those products a try.



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21 Mar 2007, 3:59 am

I've never had GF bread or pasta that was much good with the exception of the Pamela's muffin mix. The downside is all that rice flour is uhm ...very binding. So might want to have some laxative on hand.



calandale
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21 Mar 2007, 5:59 am

Bean threads are yummy. Like little clear worms.

Corn tortillas can replace bread for sandwiches.



computerlove
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21 Mar 2007, 7:29 pm

calandale wrote:
Bean threads are yummy. Like little clear worms.

Corn tortillas can replace bread for sandwiches.


bean threads? that sounds like something that I think won't be easily available here in my country (mexico).

I'm on my way with tortillas, love to eat that with some beans in a taco, some sauce and yummy!

now I have to find some sweet things to replace cereal...

Is some yoghurt okay? to serve it with fruits+granola+honey?


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aspiebegood
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21 Mar 2007, 7:52 pm

If you suspect you have celiac's you should get tested. If you find that you do have celiacs then reducing gluten will not be enough. You will have to completely eliminate your gluten intake.


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calandale
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21 Mar 2007, 8:26 pm

Yogurt is great. I don't really like putting anything in it though. I like nice plain whole milk yogurt, preferably with cream on top.



nutbag
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21 Mar 2007, 8:50 pm

I am trying some enzymes. I found a blend supposed to do carbs and protiens. As I am a veggie, going sans wheat and dairy would be difficult.


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22 Mar 2007, 2:53 pm

My wife is very allergic to caseine and my mother is allergic to gluten. Soy Milk works very well and task pretty good. Watch out for added sugar on them though, but you can find it without added sugar and I use Stevia to sweeten it a little. It's also a good way to get some calcium in. In the health food section/stores, there are many gluten free cereals available. As far as bread, it's very hard to find but there is one that that is often found in the freezer section from Alvarado St. Bakerys. It's a bread made from the center protein of a grain and it's pretty good. (They even have a bagel made from the stuff).

-Scott



richardbenson
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22 Mar 2007, 3:39 pm

i tried a gluten free diet for awhile. i just couldnt stick to it! i needed bread :cry:



Apatura
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22 Mar 2007, 3:54 pm

Quinoa--- it sounds exotic but is in fact very easy to prepare. I can buy it at my regular grocery store. You preapre it like rice-- 2 parts water for 1 part quinoa, bring to boil and simmer for about 15 minutes. Once it's cooked, I mix it with olive oil and lemon juice. You can add any number of cut veggies too... it's delicious.

I use 1 cup olive oil and juice of 2 lemons per 4 cups cooked quinoa.

I eat mine mixed with black beans (rinsed well, from a can) parsely, cilantro, scallions, red bell pepper snipped into very small pieces.



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22 Mar 2007, 3:58 pm

I love rice noodles, and there are many sauces you can buy that don't have gluten or dairy in them. (Amoy do a few decent ones, some others do have wheat in them)

I love to make stir frys with those, the rice noodles are easily made (you just soak them in boiling water for 5 minutes) and it takes aboput 5-10 minutes to cook a healthy and tasty dinner that way :)



tkmattson
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23 Mar 2007, 11:06 am

computerlove wrote:
Hi people, been lately thinking about reducing amounts of gluten/caseine ingestion,
and was thinking that I like to have cereal or sandwiches for dinner, and I'd like
some ideas or tips for alternatives to these.

thanks :D


Those two food preferences are probably going to be significantly altered if you choose to go GFCF. After months we are still searching for breads that are actually "good", and not just "good despite the fact it's gluten free". The best you're going to find in that department is probably either a local bakery that already makes it, or is willing to meet a special request for gluten free bread. Even at that, the learning curve to making a good GF bread is steep, as my chef wife will tell you, it's counterintuitive to everything taught to chefs and bakers. Cereal is a whole nother issue, as you can find pretty good GFCF cereals, but soy milk ain't for everybody, and it's certainly not for me. If you can easily switch, more power to you.

My advice, if you're planning on doing this for a while, focus on cuisines that are mostly GFCF friendly - barbeque (watch out for sauces, breads, but almost everything else is okay), mexican (stick to corn tortillas instead of flour, skip the cheese and sour cream, get guacamole instead), and Thai food - rice noodles, etc. - you may find the most variety in this cuisine. After a month or so, THEN try some of the breads and so forth, as you may not be so picky at that point.

I don't know if you drink alchohol as well, but there is much hidden gluten there. For the most part, beer, and most grain based liquors (whiskey, popular vodkas like Absolut & Stoli) contain gluten. Wine is fine, as is actually potato vodka (which is disgusting by the way), and Tequila is okay as well - if you drink whiskey, I strongly rec'd trying Cuervo Black instead, it has a very similar taste to Jack Daniels believe it or not, and can be mixed with cola for instance.

On the plus side, sometimes gluten and casien don't exist in certain places you would expect them to, like butter (only trace amounts - which for some people is a non starter, but you can drive yourself crazy, and or starve in our culture if you go THAT far) and eggs. Kosher hot dogs don't have casein, regular ones do. Jenny's coconut macaroons, one of my longtime favorite cookies, is gluten free. Just as it is surprising what actually HAS gluten in it, it also can be surprising what doesn't.



Noetic
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23 Mar 2007, 1:23 pm

tkmattson wrote:
Cereal is a whole nother issue, as you can find pretty good GFCF cereals, but soy milk ain't for everybody, and it's certainly not for me. If you can easily switch, more power to you.

I'd recommend almond milk, tastes lovely with cereal!



TheMachine1
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23 Mar 2007, 1:38 pm

If I have to choose between not eating bread and dairy or the Matrix. I choose the Matrix.



tkmattson
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23 Mar 2007, 2:47 pm

Noetic wrote:
tkmattson wrote:
Cereal is a whole nother issue, as you can find pretty good GFCF cereals, but soy milk ain't for everybody, and it's certainly not for me. If you can easily switch, more power to you.

I'd recommend almond milk, tastes lovely with cereal!


Tried it, and like soy milk, I found it too watery.