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shaunofthedead
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11 Jul 2015, 10:06 pm

Hello My Name is shaun i occasionally lurk on the forums in this site. I recently saw this video circulating on facebook and i believed something has to be done. I'm a person with Asperger's syndrome and i have never had any kind of tick that resulted in self harming myself nor have i ever heard of anyone else who has Asperger's syndrome having anything similar. I do not require the aid of a service animal in case of a "Meltdown". I would really like to hear other fellow aspies opinion's on this video. It will not allow me to post the video because i'm a new user so just search for "Service dog alerts to self harm (aspergers)".



Knofskia
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12 Jul 2015, 5:38 pm

I am sorry, but I do not understand. You were a bit vague - maybe you intended to be. What sort of thing do you think needs to be done?

Personally, I am autistic, I do sometimes self-harm during a meltdown, and my service dog alerts me to the harm and helps bring me out of the meltdown. I have also seen, and heard of, other autistics who self-harm during meltdowns. So, there are a few. I am happy that Autism Service Dogs are seen as more than just baby-sitters for autistic children; they can be trained to do so many tasks to help autistic adults be more independent.


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militarybrat
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01 Aug 2015, 4:43 pm

I am an aspies and I have had issues with both self injurious behaviors and meltdowns (usually separate events though some people do have them together). I also work with a service dog and some of her tasks have to do with intervening to stop, prevent, and help recover from these two issues. These are actually relatively common things for many on the spectrum and Autism/Asperger's Service Animals are trained for this if their handlers need them to be. It is usually not their only function though. A service animal is individual trained for the specific needs of its handler and typically perform several different tasks depending on those needs. Just because you do not experience something doesn't mean others on the spectrum don't experience it. We are actually quite a diverse group of people. So, it is probably best that you couldn't reply as you do not know this individual personally, nor are you qualified to assess their needs and/or what/how their service animal is trained for.



Kiriae
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02 Aug 2015, 7:41 am

As a kid I had a normal dog, not service dog. It was not trained or anything, just a normal family dog. A mix of golden retrivier and some mongrel.
And I remember it helped me out in a meltdown once. I was crying in our garden and the dog come to me and started behaving pretty much like the one in this video - it desperately wanted to get my attention. I don't recall hitting myself at that situation though, just crying badly and having no idea what to do with myself. Eventually the dog managed to distract me and I calmed down while hugging it.



m3zomo
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31 Oct 2015, 5:50 pm

I didn't see that video you are talking about, but I'm sorry for you



Ganondox
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01 Nov 2015, 7:26 am

Nice to hear that you don't require a service animal, but it's not for you. It's for people who actually would benefit from it, and there are many.


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Chummy
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04 Nov 2015, 11:11 am

I have a family dog in my parent's house. Here's the story:

I was vising my folk's city in the weekend and me and my mom saw this poor street dog just trying to find some house to go into, as if she was trying to find a caregiver and an owner to make happy. So we actually let her inside, and since them we got her all the vaccines and sterilization, and my god we mutually fell in love with that animal.

She's a mixed race avg sized dog I am pretty sure she has some Amstaff genes in her but it's really vague.
Anyway although some would think of her as a bit scary at first sight, she rarely barks and mostly will come to you shaking her tail trying to lick your entire face and body!!

Whenever I visit my parents which I tend to plan every 2-3 weeks for a weekend I let her sleep in my room! Dogs' are humans' BEST friends...

I think I know the video you're speaking of.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=58&v=0M7PuuukzxY

Very touching indeed.



artfulldodger
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05 Nov 2015, 9:43 pm

I am also diagnosed Aspie, and while I do not have a true service dog, both my female boarder collie/beagle mix and my purebred Siberian Husky will come snuggle with me or stay by my side thru both meltdowns and shut downs. Sometimes I do not even realize I am starting to have a meltdown when one of them will come up and start snuggling to calm me down. I haven't really self harmed since I was a teen but I can be destructive to objects(throwing) or others(throwing objects at them)during my more violent meltdowns. If I lived alone, I would look into a service dog to help keep me stable. Dodger


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