High functioning autism and Adapative functioning

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ScaryAspie92
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19 Feb 2016, 3:25 pm

I've read a few studies that indicate that there are discrepancies between Iq and Adapative Functioning in high functioning autism. Adaptive skills are often lower than the individual's iq would suggest, I know this is case with me my iq is in the low average to average range but my adaptive skills are quite impaired.
What do you guys think of think? Adaptive skills refereres to daily living skills and stuff.


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Jo_B1_Kenobi
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19 Feb 2016, 3:52 pm

ScaryAspie92 wrote:
I've read a few studies that indicate that there are discrepancies between Iq and Adapative Functioning in high functioning autism. Adaptive skills are often lower than the individual's iq would suggest, I know this is case with me my iq is in the low average to average range but my adaptive skills are quite impaired.
What do you guys think of think? Adaptive skills refereres to daily living skills and stuff.


I think I'm the same. I have a high IQ but my adaptive skills are still quite impared. My dad used to say to me "For someone who's supposed to be intelligent you're really ******g stupid sometimes." I think he was picking up on the disparity between my academic abilities and my ability to do the daily living skills malarky. Even now as an adult I will frequently make a cup of tea because I'm thirsty (or because I have a headache and think it might be because I've forgotten to have a drink for a while) and then I'll somehow think that I've done that job and leave the full cup of tea on the side. Give me some special relativity problems and I'm right there, but I struggle to feed myself adequately sometimes.


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kraftiekortie
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19 Feb 2016, 8:13 pm

Yep....what you say is definitely true. This occurs quite frequently in Asperger's/HFA.



LaetiBlabla
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19 Feb 2016, 8:47 pm

I think Autism is disabling, high IQ is also disabling.



zkydz
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19 Feb 2016, 9:18 pm

LaetiBlabla wrote:
I think Autism is disabling, high IQ is also disabling.
OK...High IQ is disabling? How can that be?

As for the adaptive skills, I really suck at that. And the ability to adapt to changing circumstances are getting worse. Here is a litany of things I heard growing up:
"You ain't got a lick of sense."
"If you're head weren't screwed on, you'd lose it."
"What makes you think that's ok?" (What ever that may have been at any given time up to this very day)
"You got book learnin' but no common sense."
"Do you ever stop and think?"
"Stop being silly!"

I'm sure there were many more.


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20 Feb 2016, 2:51 am

yes, definitely, I have this issue, and I think a lot of Asperger's/HFAs have areas that they are okay or good at, and then areas that have serious impairment. Being organized and managing long-term, complex tasks can be difficult for me, and I have difficulty understanding spoken instructions, especially if there are a lot of steps. I have to make people repeat themselves several times.

I heard similar things to zkydz when I was growing up:
"GW's head is always in the clouds"
"In her own little world" (yep, they were talking about me as though I weren't standing right there)
"You'd get better grades if you'd just pay attention" (I also have ADHD)
"Why did it take you an hour and a half to get home from school when it's a mile away?" (well, there was a bug, and a flower, and an abandoned house, and a dog, and it barked at me, and I was scared to move, and...)

Frequently my boss would yell at me because I was late on a project, over budget, or forgot to follow some company procedure. She'd ask me, "How can you be one of my best technical people but always be forgetting to follow the rules or stay on plan and budget? You're judgement is no good!"

I told her about the autism diagnosis last fall, and it explained a lot to her. I'm working on an important project right now, and she got the excellent idea of pairing me up with a guy who is very organized, good with customers, and good at project management. He doesn't like to code so much, and I tend to forget the organizational stuff and whatever I don't write down, so it's a good match.


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Edna3362
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20 Feb 2016, 3:08 am

I'm seriously working on my adaptive functioning for years now. Secretly, even. Although, I choose more on the practical skills part than on the get-along with others part. The former can be learned through willingness. The latter isn't natural, willing or not in my case.

Sure, I can handle responsibilities of an independent person, but that doesn't mean I get to be an "actress" for one-thirds of my life, for at least 2 hours a week. :|
In other words, I want wisdom and experience, not acting skills. Acting skills doesn't catch my interest yet and experience tells me 'fake it-to-make it' is detrimental. I prefer social skills to be learned in my own pace, in my own experience, and not enforced or rushed just because.


I can handle changes just as fine... Unless it's a last-minute change, which is just annoying. I can handle chaotic environments too without getting frustrated or overwhelmed or consciously coping with it. And I can still function without plans or directions (not the reckless act-before thinking), improvising is still fun.


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JakeASD
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20 Feb 2016, 3:08 am

I have a low IQ and my adaptive skills are terrible, too. Thus, there isn't a discrepancy for me, personally.

I am convinced that I am intellectually handicapped but both my psychiatrist and case manager disagree. :(


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20 Feb 2016, 3:15 am

JakeASD wrote:
I have a low IQ and my adaptive skills are terrible, too. Thus, there isn't a discrepancy for me, personally.

I am convinced that I am intellectually handicapped but both my psychiatrist and case manager disagree. :(


People with ASD often perform poorly on IQ tests for various reasons. It's possible that your true IQ is not revealed by the tests.

You do not seem intellectually disabled to me. Sorry if that is not what you want to hear.



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20 Feb 2016, 3:22 am

My adaptive functioning is terrible. I have IQ of at least* 117, but even though I don't have any significant physical disabilities, I can't live independently. Adult life is too complicated. So many little chores. I can't keep them all straight, or make myself do the ones I can remember. Me being smart is like a sports car having a great engine but no wheels.

I like to think I'll manage living on my own some day, probably even own a well-cared-for pet, but I'll probably never be able to have kids even though I want to :(

(*My IQ was high enough for my schools "gifted" program, but I never found out the number. When I went to a psychologist more recently, that's where I got 117, but it was a special "brief" test just designed to make sure you're not intellectually disabled or something, and the psychologist opined that my real IQ is probably higher. *shrug* Well, 117 is far from being some kind of genius, but you'd think I wouldn't have any thinking-related problems.)

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OK...High IQ is disabling? How can that be?


I don't think there's any downsides to my high IQ, but granted, I don't have super-high IQ, so maybe it gets worse if it's higher. Sometimes I've seen people complain about the woes of high IQ, but it's usually about how they have to act like "normal people" in order to get along with anyone, or about how their smart kid gets distracted too easily in school. Certainly, it can be a target for bullies and snide (jealous?) remarks. When I was a kid, I was emotionally immune to criticism from peers (between my introversion and my poor theory of mind, I neither understood nor cared about what they thought), so that might have saved my emotional health.


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20 Feb 2016, 3:33 am

Cyllya1 wrote:
Quote:
OK...High IQ is disabling? How can that be?


I don't think there's any downsides to my high IQ, but granted, I don't have super-high IQ, so maybe it gets worse if it's higher. Sometimes I've seen people complain about the woes of high IQ, but it's usually about how they have to act like "normal people" in order to get along with anyone, or about how their smart kid gets distracted too easily in school. Certainly, it can be a target for bullies and snide (jealous?) remarks. When I was a kid, I was emotionally immune to criticism from peers (between my introversion and my poor theory of mind, I neither understood nor cared about what they thought), so that might have saved my emotional health.
Whether smart or not, people will always find something to make fun of. And, people who are not so smart can be afraid of people who are very smart. But that is not a disability.

Being smart is not a disability. Being smart doesn't prevent you from doing anything. It is an asset. It may be hard to find a way to use it as a way to benefit your life though, just not a disability.


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Yigeren
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20 Feb 2016, 5:26 am

I agree, being smart is not a disability. But my IQ is high enough that I feel sort of alienated from other people, which is separate from the autism.

It definitely is an asset, but it's one more thing that sets me apart from others. I used to pretend to not be intelligent to fit in with my peers as a kid.

Every once in awhile someone is really surprised by my intelligence, and I often feel embarrassed.

Not that I'm a genius or anything. I'm "gifted". But most people are not, and those that are tend to be successful, whereas I'm not. So I'd likely never have a chance to interact with those that are, and perhaps the difference in financial situations may make it difficult to find common ground.

And many very intelligent people seem to have a superiority complex, which I don't want to have to deal with.



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20 Feb 2016, 6:10 am

Simply calling yourself smart will be considered arrogant by most people. Any good qualities you may possess, I think it's better to let your deeds and accomplishments show, without verbally acknowledging them, and, failing that, better not to show them at all. Other people don't need to know about them after all, especially if it'll only make them hostile.


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zkydz
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20 Feb 2016, 7:54 am

Spiderpig wrote:
Simply calling yourself smart will be considered arrogant by most people. Any good qualities you may possess, I think it's better to let your deeds and accomplishments show.....
My thoughts exactly. Although, doesn't sit well with those that require 'proof' like a degree or something. But, those are the people that if you built your own warp drive, was the first to get to another planet or planetary system, they would still want you to prove your pedigree. To those people, I say a hearty f**k you and the horse you rode in on.

What embarrasses me is the contradiction of being smart and then doing very stupid things that I get dunned for. THEN they can't believe I'm smart......


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RAADS-R -- 213.3
FQ -- 18.7
EQ -- 13
Aspie Quiz -- 186 out of 200
AQ: 42
AQ-10: 8.8


LaetiBlabla
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20 Feb 2016, 10:53 am

zkydz wrote:
LaetiBlabla wrote:
I think Autism is disabling, high IQ is also disabling.


OK...High IQ is disabling? How can that be?

As for the adaptive skills, I really suck at that. And the ability to adapt to changing circumstances are getting worse. Here is a litany of things I heard growing up:
"You ain't got a lick of sense."
"If you're head weren't screwed on, you'd lose it."
"What makes you think that's ok?" (What ever that may have been at any given time up to this very day)
"You got book learnin' but no common sense."
"Do you ever stop and think?"
"Stop being silly!"

I'm sure there were many more.


High IQ is disabling while around with other people with lower IQ.
I tell you from long experience.
You can understand it only if you have high IQ.
Having high IQ feels like if you were living in the middle of monkeys who laugh at you when you speak, because you do not say "hoo hoo hoo hoo". Then you have to translate your language into "hoo hoo s" ...exhausting.

Also, you learn to not care about insults like those above. You learn to have mercy for others' misunderstanding.