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Christy99
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10 Feb 2017, 9:49 am

what are some of the things you wonder if they are an autism thing or a neurotypical thing? do i do this because of autism or does everyone do it? write your question and post answers to questions.

my question.... Do I jump when someone comes up from behind me and startles me surprises me and touches me when i didn't see them coming because it is an autism thing? or does everyone including neurotypical people do this?



BTDT
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10 Feb 2017, 10:13 am

I know lots of neurotypical people that startle.



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10 Feb 2017, 3:10 pm

I think most people might startle if it was unexpected.

I'm 53 and only diagnosed 2 years ago. But I have always flinched even when the I saw the touch coming, I had to rub the area until the sensation went away and have always been reluctant to touch others (except for my children but even then I had little moments).

I want to be touched, to touch but it makes me feel so uncomfortable.

But there maybe other reasons for a neurot to feel that way too? Abuse comes to mind.



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10 Feb 2017, 7:12 pm

This happens to me and in a search in forum it seems it's very common in autistic world:

wrongplanet.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=334669
wrongplanet.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=264138
wrongplanet.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=210831
wrongplanet.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=322082
wrongplanet.net/postp3672578.html



248RPA
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10 Feb 2017, 8:39 pm

I think the frequency and intensity of the startling things determines whether it is an autism thing or an NT thing. All the NTs I know do not startle as noticeably as I do. I also get more easily startled, so I get many triggers throughout the day while they usually get none. Also, I still startle when I know something is gonna happen, but they really only startle when they completely do not expect something.


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11 Feb 2017, 1:27 am

My mum jumps more than anyone I have ever met. She's not autistic. It's normal human behaviour. In comparison to her I never jump, I think I can hear and see things coming much better than she can though.



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11 Feb 2017, 2:32 am

I don't jump when someone puts their hand on me.


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Britte
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11 Feb 2017, 5:32 am

Question: Is jumping up and down, when happy and excited about something, related to autism, or, otherwise?



248RPA
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11 Feb 2017, 6:32 am

Britte wrote:
Question: Is jumping up and down, when happy and excited about something, related to autism, or, otherwise?

Well, it could be a stim, if you're relating it to autism. But I know NTs who jump up and down when happy about something.


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Britte
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11 Feb 2017, 6:47 pm

Thank you, 248RPA!

Somehow, my understanding of op's post/intention was for each participant to post a question of their own, as well. I may be wrong, though. I thought it was a nice idea, in any case.



The Powerpuff Girls
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12 Feb 2017, 2:58 am

There are lots of things, one right off is that do NTs feel emotions as strong as I do? Which is often intense and overwhelming, whether it is good or bad.

Do I have a strong caring heart because I have Autism or am I just 'special'?



iliketrees
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12 Feb 2017, 3:21 am

The Powerpuff Girls wrote:
There are lots of things, one right off is that do NTs feel emotions as strong as I do? Which is often intense and overwhelming, whether it is good or bad.

TIL I'm NT, along with 85% of adults with ASD apparently.



Britte
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12 Feb 2017, 3:58 am

Hi, iliketrees. It's been good to see you around, in recent weeks! Would you mind elaborating on what you just wrote? The way I read your post is as follows:

'TIL (Today You Learned) that you are NT, along with 85% of adults with ASD'. Are you saying that you've learned that you and 85% of adults on the autism spectrum, are also, NT/Neurotypical?



iliketrees
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12 Feb 2017, 4:33 am

Britte wrote:
Would you mind elaborating on what you just wrote?

85% of adults with ASD have alexithymia, so 85% of adults with ASD have difficulty perceiving emotions in themselves, which would imply 85% of adults with ASD do not feel emotions strongly if they struggle to identify them. NTs may not feel emotions strongly, therefore 85% of adults with ASD are NT.

It was a facetious remark (I think?)



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12 Feb 2017, 4:53 am

Oh, I understand, now. Thank you for the detailed explanation! It, now makes sense to me (despite the fact that you were, perhaps, being facetious)

: )



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05 Mar 2017, 10:53 am

My ex used to like sneaking up on me in public places where we'd gone to meet up, then suddenly hug me from behind. It used to terrify me - even after I wised up to his behaviour but still got caught out. I screamed very loudly and embarrassingly the last time he did that and I think he got the message that it probably was a bit too much for me. I wouldn't have thought such a reaction is the sole domain of autism though; being startled in such a way seems a natural human reaction for anyone, thanks to the effects of adrenaline.


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