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sparkplugloy
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25 Jun 2004, 3:34 pm

When I was eleven and a half years old, I learned how to program in QuickBasic. I also taught myself html. As I have not had the chance to, I never tried to learn other languages but now I would like to learn more about computer programming and web programming.

Do you have any references to give me ?

Thanks in advance,

Loy


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alex
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25 Jun 2004, 3:41 pm

Learning Perl (o'reilly published it)! People refer to it as "The Lama Book" because a lama is on the cover. I really like this book and I'm learning a lot from it. Once you get into more advanced programming, you can get "Programming Perl" it has a camel on the front and, as a result, its called the camel book.


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Nuttdan
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25 Jun 2004, 5:00 pm

It's a Camel, Alex, a Camel! :o The Camel Book! (at least that's what I've read everywhere else)

I, of course, recommend PHP if you want to get into some web programming, it's a great language. Perl is nice, too for tha sort of thing.

Also you might want to get into VisualBasic, even though VisualBasic sucks in my humble nerdy opinion. But something like that to learn object oriented programming.

One of the major stumbling blocks for some programmers is learning how to think and code in an object-oriented way. Hell, I'm not even there myself.



alex
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25 Jun 2004, 5:21 pm

Nuttdan wrote:
It's a Camel, Alex, a Camel! :o The Camel Book! (at least that's what I've read everywhere else)



One of them is called the camel book the other is called the lama book.


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Rogue
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30 Jun 2004, 4:04 am

Quote:
I, of course, recommend PHP if you want to get into some web programming, it's a great language.


Are there any books you would recommend for beginners? I know HTML and really want get into PHP :)



alex
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30 Jun 2004, 8:02 am

Rogue wrote:
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I, of course, recommend PHP if you want to get into some web programming, it's a great language.


Are there any books you would recommend for beginners? I know HTML and really want get into PHP :)


I've never read any of the o'reilly PHP books, but I LOVE O'reilly books. I would get the O'reilly "Learning PHP" if I were you (I have the "Learning Perl" book which is absolutely fabulous). Dan also told me that "PHP and MySQL for Dummies" is good.


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Rogue
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01 Jul 2004, 4:18 pm

Thanks, I'll pick them both up.



eric76
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12 May 2014, 9:38 am

If you want to learn C++, I'd recommend Bjarne Stroustrup's Programming -- Principles and Practice Using C++ to begin with.

After that, Dietel & Dietel's C++ How to Program.

Also, Bjarne Stroustrup's Programming -- Principles and Practice Using C++.



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12 May 2014, 9:52 am

You know, you could have waited two more months, so then it would be a 10+ years necro


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eric76
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12 May 2014, 11:40 am

Shatbat wrote:
You know, you could have waited two more months, so then it would be a 10+ years necro


Yeah, but then you might have expected that. This way I caught you off guard.



jayjayuk
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12 May 2014, 1:11 pm

The topic of web development is broad. If I were you I'd spend some time figuring out what it is you want to learn and why. Stepping foot into web development shouldn't be taken lightly because you're going to spend much of your time learning various languages to meet your end goal. You want to the learn the languages you're going to use in most projects and devote much of your time to learning them.

There's a number of paths you can go down, but essentially you're going to want to learn HTML 5, CSS 3, and JavaScript (plus add on jQuery). So theres 4 things you're going to need to learn, and to do it properly, and semantically, and to ensure what you develop will work on all of the most popular browsers is going to be a task.

Now, the above are languages for the "front end". The "user interface". Next you need to deal with the backend (business logic, database etc). The conventional route is to learn the LAMP stack (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP). But, with the shifting times more people are creating web applications that are highly responsive and make use of asynchronous request. For this you'll likely need to use a MEAN stack (MongoDB, Express, AngularJS and NodeJS). Personally, I switched to a MEAN stack a while ago. I was developing highly responsive Facebook applications that had a lot of traffic and needed to be streamlined and fast.

Learning all of the above though is not something I'd do starting out. In my opinion, learn the languages/technologies that make up the MEAN stack and the front end languages. Those are bleeding edge at the moment in the web development world.

As for books, use Amazon. Make sure you get recently published books, and check the users ratings. There's tonnes of books, but if you use Amazon + Google to read personal reviews you can find some excellent books.

Also, bookmark the manuals for the languages you intend to start with. The manuals are a great place to start. For HTML stay away from the specifications to begin with, they will cause a great deal of confusion.

When I am home I will post the books I have in my library that I can recommend.

Oh, also you will want to learn the term MVC and what it means (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Model%E2%8 ... controller). If you're going down the PHP route check out Laravel, Symfony and CakePHP (all do pretty much the same thing, but you'll need to find one you feel comfortable with).

Obviously without knowing what your end goal is (i.e. personal hobby, employment, developing your own sites or applications) my advice is a little limited.

Jump in the deep end, and have fun :D

Edit: http://stackoverflow.com is your friend also :p