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Shahunshah
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18 Jul 2017, 8:07 pm

Well at this point I am planning to do an autism fundraiser at school to support people on the spectrum. I have planned stuff out with a few friends and at this stage it looks as though we are going to be selling fidget spinners for autism. In part because they are popular and secondly because you know autistic people like them and it relates to the topic. The plan at this point is to obtain them from a wholesaler as a means to do so.

I have contacted Autism New Zealand so far and they have offered to lend their logo to us. Nothing else has happened so far.

I am hatching up a scheme to make this as successful as possible, which includes recruiting 3 autistic students I know. I feel that these people are very articulate and could perhaps help our side articulate its point across to those at the school. I am trying to use my friends to build a social network as a means of making this happen. I feel that if people know someone in a group or want to get on with them they are more likely to join. So far I have gotten one of these people to join the fundraiser.

I am considering me and the three of us going to classrooms shortly before the fundraiser takes place in order to inform people of just how important this issue is.



kraftiekortie
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18 Jul 2017, 8:33 pm

Make of list of prominent people who are on the Spectrum, or who are speculated to be on the Spectrum.

People have to know that people with autism can be successful, too.

Write something on Temple Grandin. She will appeal, especially, to people who are into agriculture--rural people.



Shahunshah
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19 Jul 2017, 5:43 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
Make of list of prominent people who are on the Spectrum, or who are speculated to be on the Spectrum.

People have to know that people with autism can be successful, too.

Write something on Temple Grandin. She will appeal, especially, to people who are into agriculture--rural people.

I will go both positive and negative I guess. I have to let people know the staggering statistics and what a big issue it is. I will remember to say stuff like it is estimated that only 15% of autistic adults are employed.



DataB4
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19 Jul 2017, 6:19 am

Great idea, and you're off to an awesome start with the wholesale provider, fellow autistic students, and permission to speak in classes. Teachers might have good ideas too.

When you tell everyone, share how your chosen organization will use the money. Try to tell the story of how the organization helps people. Making it real and personal works better than general statements.

Less effective: "Support the XYZ Autism Employment Program and help people get jobs."

Better: "Last year, 500 people found jobs, and some of them even found their dream jobs, thanks to the XYZ Autism Employment Program. For example, Don Smith sent out dozens of applications but wasn't getting any callbacks. He had no experience, but he needed money. XYZ connected him with paid internships he would never have known about, and they helped him prepare for the interview that landed him the internship. Today, Don is successfully employed at his place of internship, with the help of XYZ."

Many organizations have great fundraising materials you can use, and they often have vignettes and case studies that they use to show how they really do change people's lives. See if any of those give you ideas.

Does your school have honor societies or community service programs? They may be able to help in some way, perhaps even support a related cause for their next project.

Good luck with your fundraiser. :)



AspieUtah
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19 Jul 2017, 6:41 am

Talking about autism benefits and recognized autists through history (and today) gives great background information to people for whom autism is mostly just a word. Recruit a few local autists of differing ages who can speak about their own experience with autism to make the past relevant to today.

Also, the spinners will make the event fun, but you should try to find ways to make the information funny (without being insulting or cruel). A good example of being funny about autism are the ways some TED Talk speakers have made their talks interesting ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yfFwDq4R5M and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkD9d8qzB-g ). This kind of humor can be helpful in talks or even within fliers and posters. Humor would lighten the mood for a lot of people.

About a week before the event, call your local news media, and offer to speak with them about the upcoming event describing what it hopes to achieve and the estimated attendance.

Good luck! :)


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Diagnosed in 2015 with ASD Level 1 by the University of Utah Health Care Autism Spectrum Disorder Clinic using the ADOS-2 Module 4 assessment instrument [11/30] -- Screened in 2014 with ASD by using the University of Cambridge Autism Research Centre AQ (Adult) [43/50]; EQ-60 for adults [11/80]; FQ [43/135]; SQ (Adult) [130/150] self-reported screening inventories -- Assessed since 1978 with an estimated IQ [≈145] by several clinicians -- Contact on WrongPlanet.net by private message (PM)


Shahunshah
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19 Jul 2017, 6:56 am

DataB4 wrote:
Great idea, and you're off to an awesome start with the wholesale provider, fellow autistic students, and permission to speak in classes. Teachers might have good ideas too.

When you tell everyone, share how your chosen organization will use the money. Try to tell the story of how the organization helps people. Making it real and personal works better than general statements.

Less effective: "Support the XYZ Autism Employment Program and help people get jobs."

Better: "Last year, 500 people found jobs, and some of them even found their dream jobs, thanks to the XYZ Autism Employment Program. For example, Don Smith sent out dozens of applications but wasn't getting any callbacks. He had no experience, but he needed money. XYZ connected him with paid internships he would never have known about, and they helped him prepare for the interview that landed him the internship. Today, Don is successfully employed at his place of internship, with the help of XYZ."

Many organizations have great fundraising materials you can use, and they often have vignettes and case studies that they use to show how they really do change people's lives. See if any of those give you ideas.

Does your school have honor societies or community service programs? They may be able to help in some way, perhaps even support a related cause for their next project.

Good luck with your fundraiser. :)
Thanks allot I think you have some great ideas.

I am indeed supporting Autism New Zealand's Employment program at this point. I have quite a few anecdotes I could use many from here on Wrong Planet, if I need to explain what exactly I am fighting for. Maybe we can show both the triumph and the tragedy of people on the autism spectrum. When people hear about how people are doing badly and suffering they are more inclined to think this is a really big issue and take action.



kraftiekortie
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19 Jul 2017, 8:02 am

I wouldn't say that "only 15% of people with autism are employed." I don't believe that's the case. It hasn't been proven, anyway.

I would say that this is a figure covering all people with autism, including those who are considered "low-functioning."

Many people on WrongPlanet are on the Spectrum, and are employed.

It's a needless (and probably untrue) negative.



Shahunshah
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19 Jul 2017, 8:24 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
I wouldn't say that "only 15% of people with autism are employed." I don't believe that's the case. It hasn't been proven, anyway.

I would say that this is a figure covering all people with autism, including those who are considered "low-functioning."

Many people on WrongPlanet are on the Spectrum, and are employed.

It's a needless (and probably untrue) negative.

It is what autism new Zealand provided. i think it could be close to impossible to prove.



kraftiekortie
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19 Jul 2017, 8:25 am

I wouldn't convey that information if I were you. It would dis-inspire people needlessly.

Aspies tend to rely too much on research studies, anyway.

I would work on making sure people with autism know they have a chance to succeed.



Last edited by kraftiekortie on 19 Jul 2017, 8:27 am, edited 1 time in total.

Shahunshah
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19 Jul 2017, 8:27 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
I wouldn't convey that information if I were you. It would dis-inspire people needlessly.

Aspies tend to rely too much on research studies, anyway.

Are you sure about de-inspire. it is also in regards to fulltime employment.



kraftiekortie
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19 Jul 2017, 8:34 am

Many people here are employed full-time, including me.

I see nothing wrong with discussing the deficits of autism---like social deficits, etc. Because they are true.

But the employment thing----that depends on the individual.

There is actually no such word as "dis-inspire." In this context, one would use "dishearten." Like: "If Aspies feel that they probably won't become employed because they are Aspie, they would feel disheartened."



kraftiekortie
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19 Jul 2017, 8:47 am

I would say, perhaps: "Many people with autism spectrum disorders find it difficult to obtain employment and become independent. This does not mean that any particular individual cannot obtain employment, or become independent. Because many Spectrumites do find jobs, become independent, and get married."



kraftiekortie
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19 Jul 2017, 9:13 am

I wouldn't paint a "rosy" picture of autism.

But I wouldn't paint a hopeless picture of it, either.

Because autism is neither "rosy" or hopeless.

The main thing: you have to convey the fact that people with autism are PEOPLE, first and foremost, and deserve the respect accorded any person as an individual.



Shahunshah
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19 Jul 2017, 3:06 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
I wouldn't convey that information if I were you. It would dis-inspire people needlessly.

Aspies tend to rely too much on research studies, anyway.

I would work on making sure people with autism know they have a chance to succeed.

Facts can overwhelm and surprise people, thats what I am aiming to do. I also will reinforce the idea that autistic people can work like others.



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19 Jul 2017, 3:27 pm

I would say definitely combat discrimination and stereotyping that happens to people on the spectrum both from others on the spectrum and from people off the spectrum. Give people the truth about what happens to one's reputation when they get diagnosed with autism... people will think you have or don't have this or that problem... whether or not it's true about you. They may also think some impossible and cruel things, like that you have no feelings.



Shahunshah
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27 Jul 2017, 6:36 am

So some updates. We ended up getting around 6 people on board. Our total market at this stage is estimated to be around 35 people. These people are mostly the year 12s and 13s in our school. At have not figured out a way for how to tap into year 11s and international students. That is what I am currently trying to do so the number of our people increases.

I am thinking of ways to do this.

For one the plan is to create heaps of little posters to place around the school. On each of these posters an image of the best looking fidget spinners will be shown in order to catch peoples eyes. That as well as the fact they are being sold at only around 6 dollars.

After that the plan is then to create a school event via facebook so that people know to bring money to the occasion. I have already received the deputy principal's permission for this. We are also allowed to bring in more people for this out of school provided he knows about it.

In addition we also might send people up into classes in order to inform them of this important issue. And confront them with it, informing them that their is a fundraiser as well as reinforcing them of how important the issue is. The deal is while people may dismiss a board they see conveying the message of the fundraser it is impossible to do so whilst you are in class and someone is speaking about that issue.

It also may be a good idea to get a year 11 and an international student on our side preferably one who their peers like. People do and are often expected to do things for their friends and their groups. Maybe we could use that to our advantage. Provided we get them to play to their crowd.