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kokopelli
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25 Jun 2018, 12:31 am

SabbraCadabra wrote:
I'm not that obsessed with computers, but I could be if I wanted to. I try to keep my purchases to a minimum, especially since I don't have a ton of room to set up PCs, and buying that kind of stuff online (especially if I want a case) is a lot more expensive these days, let alone the shipping costs. I have quite a few older machines though, in various states of assembly.

I've never been much for Linux, I play too many Windows/DOS games. I also don't really care to learn new OSes, I get frustrated enough when new versions of Windows move things around.


The latest Windows I have at the office is Windows 2000. It doesn't get used for much at all.

Although I prefer OpenBSD for servers and Linux for workstations, my current workstation is running OpenBSD. I'll probably go back to using SuSE Linux in the near future for the workstation.



RetroGamer87
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27 Jun 2018, 8:29 pm

kokopelli wrote:
I have thought about doing one thing really strange with computers. It would be interesting to take everything out of the box and mount them on my walls and ceilings. Make it hard to see where one computer ended and the next ended. And, of course, they would all be networked together through switches taken out of the boxes and mounted on the walls. It would be almost like being inside a computer.

Yes! Do it! Include lots of screens and a cool looking chair!

And lots of blinken lights. Preferably ones that serve some useful diagnostic purpose rather than just blinking in an arbitrary pattern. Just for fun you could run the sound output to an oscilloscope.

Technology is always more interesting when you can see it working. That's why people like to look at steam locomotives more than Diesel Electric locomotives. The Diesel Electric locomotives have a decent degree of mechanical complexity but it's all in a box. It looks like a box on wheels. In Steam locomotives many of the moving parts are mounted to the outside. You can see them working.

It would be fascinating to see computers get the same treatment. I hate how many companies (especially Apple) want computers to be these opaque boxes that seamingly run on magic (every time Apple describes one of their products as "magical" a kitten dies). I think these consumer tech companies want their customers to be far removed from the inner workings of their products. They don't want the customer to tinker with the device, they only want the customer to buy more media from the app store.


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kokopelli
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29 Jun 2018, 4:43 am

RetroGamer87 wrote:
kokopelli wrote:
I have thought about doing one thing really strange with computers. It would be interesting to take everything out of the box and mount them on my walls and ceilings. Make it hard to see where one computer ended and the next ended. And, of course, they would all be networked together through switches taken out of the boxes and mounted on the walls. It would be almost like being inside a computer.

Yes! Do it! Include lots of screens and a cool looking chair!

And lots of blinken lights. Preferably ones that serve some useful diagnostic purpose rather than just blinking in an arbitrary pattern. Just for fun you could run the sound output to an oscilloscope.

Technology is always more interesting when you can see it working. That's why people like to look at steam locomotives more than Diesel Electric locomotives. The Diesel Electric locomotives have a decent degree of mechanical complexity but it's all in a box. It looks like a box on wheels. In Steam locomotives many of the moving parts are mounted to the outside. You can see them working.

It would be fascinating to see computers get the same treatment. I hate how many companies (especially Apple) want computers to be these opaque boxes that seamingly run on magic (every time Apple describes one of their products as "magical" a kitten dies). I think these consumer tech companies want their customers to be far removed from the inner workings of their products. They don't want the customer to tinker with the device, they only want the customer to buy more media from the app store.


Some people have made "computer desks". That is, the computer is inside a desk with a clear top surface.

For example, in L3p D3sk, they apparently use a dyed water to cool the CPUs so that it shows up well.



Kamryn
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29 Aug 2018, 4:16 pm

That is awesome; the computer desk. I may build one someday.

I haven't been upgrading or buying hardware or computers lately. If I were rich, I would build the most expensive one or one of the most expensive. It would be overkill, because I mostly just do basic stuff, check email, Facebook, sometimes Youtube watch movies/TV shows.
Than again, I could install Windows on another SSD and use it for gaming, if I have time for it. No since letting it go to 'waste', if you know what I mean? I'd have a Terabyte or more SSD. Windows for Gaming, and Ubuntu as my main OS, unless I find a better Linux OS.



komamanga
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29 Aug 2018, 4:26 pm

I have a desktop and a laptop. I love computers but don't have the need to collect them. For me quality is more important than quantity.



Mythos
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02 Sep 2018, 8:13 pm

It's one of the reasons why I took computer science, it's an intriguing and prescient field. I'm mostly interested in the software side, though; I want to learn assembly and machine languages, then get down to "hardware hacking" and cyber security disciplines (which is my preferred field in computer science as a whole).

I'm considering trying some digital forensics hardware, like read/write blockers. I'm quite excited to see where my next year at university leads. One of my favourite things so far though, as briefly as it's been, is networking. Individual hardware and software is cool and all, but I love connecting computers together and writing rudimentary software to allow them to communicate.

It's nothing fancy, mostly script kiddie stuff, but it's really fascinating to me.