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Hyeokgeose
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16 Aug 2018, 1:57 pm

Hey guys,

I'm building my first gaming desktop, and I'm looking for some part recommendations. Currently, I have a few parts:
- EVGA GTX 1080 FTW2 DT GPU
- EVGA Supernova 750 G+ PSU
- San Disk 480 GB SSD, 535 mb/s read speed
- Monitor + other accessories
- Windows 7 OS

Looking for:
- Motherboard, one that could fit the next generation of GPUs (if it is currently known which motherboards will be compatible with the next generation)
- CPU: something that would not likely bottleneck the next generation of GPUs
- Case: one that would allow for very good airflow, and nothing fancy or flashy, just something that works well (I have a preference for no LED lights, and I'm fine if there's no see-through panel on the side).
- RAM
- Advice/tips
-- Any other recommended parts that aren't listed

I know I'm a little late on building a 10-series computer, but I got a deal on the GTX 1080 and PSU that made it cheaper to buy that instead of a GTX 1070, since they were in a clearance sale.

I really appreciate the assistance!


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"It’s not until they tell you you’re going to die soon that you realize how short life is. Time is the most valuable thing in life because it never comes back. And whether you spend it in the arms of a loved one or alone in a prison-cell, life is what you make of it. Dream big."
-Stefán Karl Stefánsson
10 July, 1975 - 21 August, 2018.


Last edited by Hyeokgeose on 16 Aug 2018, 2:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Mythos
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16 Aug 2018, 2:26 pm

Hyeokgeose wrote:
Hey guys,

I'm building my first gaming desktop, and I'm looking for some part recommendations. Currently, I have a few parts:
- EVGA GTX 1080 FTW2 DT GPU
- EVGA Supernova 750 G+ PSU
- San Disk 480 GB SSD, 535 mb/s read speed
- Monitor + other accessories

Looking for:
- Motherboard, one that could fit the next generation of GPUs (if it is currently known which motherboards will be compatible with the next generation)
- CPU: something that would not likely bottleneck the next generation of GPUs
- Case: one that would allow for very good airflow, and nothing fancy or flashy, just something that works well (I have a preference for no LED lights, and I'm fine if there's no see-through panel on the side).
- RAM
- Advice/tips
-- Any other recommended parts that aren't listed

I know I'm a little late on building a 10-series computer, but I got a deal on the GTX 1080 and PSU that made it cheaper to buy that instead of a GTX 1070, since they were in a clearance sale.

I really appreciate the assistance!


Motherboard - decide what your CPU or GPU will be first. For example, AMD motherboards often fit AMD graphics cards and processors, etc. Usually, any would do if you follow this rule. Just be wary of it though.

CPU - I find this is often the least problematic issue on modern computers. I think, generally, 4 - 4.5 Ghz clock speed perhaps with overclocking capabilities would be best and cheapest for what you are looking for. Quad core is most ubiquitous but I've heard hexacore and even octacore are on the horizon (though would likely command exorbitant prices, probably around the £600 mark / $800 would be my guess). However, it may be good to look for something higher if such a thing even exists (I haven't looked at CPU's for a while). Note that if you're getting a powerful CPU, ensure you have a couple fans or heat sinks as well in the case of overheating.

Case - for what you're asking, something with a fair amount of space. It probably won't take up a lot in the end but it's best to be on the safe side.

RAM - 32GB - 64GB may be a good range to look at. 16GB may do it at a push.


Other tips - ensure your PSU has enough power, be absolutely certain all components will fit and that your computer will not overheating drastically.


These are all really just drastic estimations. Actual numbers and components may be slightly different, so sorry I couldn't be much more help. I hope this helps even if it's just the slightest bit though.



Hyeokgeose
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16 Aug 2018, 2:42 pm

Okay... the website bugged out on me and I lost my response. In short, I said that your advice was helpful; but, I wonder if I really need 32 - 64 GB of RAM. I also noted that I should specify that I will be running Windows 7, as well as some other side notes about my experiences with Windows 10 on my work laptop, which I now use only Ubuntu on it. Also that I don't plan on overclocking my GPU and CPU, so hopefully the PSU that I have will suffice.


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-Stefán Karl Stefánsson
10 July, 1975 - 21 August, 2018.


SabbraCadabra
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16 Aug 2018, 4:57 pm

Hyeokgeose wrote:
...I wonder if I really need 32 - 64 GB of RAM.

In my experience, web browsers are going to eat up way more RAM than any videogame :roll: I'm still hanging in there with 2 gigs, YMMV =)

I'm really out-of-date on hardware, but as far as motherboards go (or any other hardware they make), I've been pretty happy with Asus.


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17 Aug 2018, 11:02 pm

16 GB of RAM is plenty. The only reason you might want more is if you're doing your darndest to put every new game that comes out at max settings and even then most of that will be determined by what kind of video card set up you have. I'd focus on picking a decent processor and then pick a motherboard and case based on whether you want to do any SLI set up or have a large number of drives slaved together.

Generally speaking don't mess with the more extreme stuff, i.e. liquid cooling mechanisms and the like on your first build. Things can quickly get mess and expensive.


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Hyeokgeose
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17 Aug 2018, 11:23 pm

Thanks for the responses so far!

Now, I really am having trouble finding a suitable motherboard. I am looking for a processor, too, as well as specific case recommendations.


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10 July, 1975 - 21 August, 2018.


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17 Aug 2018, 11:49 pm

Pick your processor first as that will help to limit the motherboard options due to needing to be compatible with said processor. Also be mindful of the kind of power supply you'll need. Make sure you're getting one that's powerful enough to run what you're going to build.

Your motherboard form factor will also help to determine what kind of case you want i.e. whether it's ATX/micro-ATX or some other form factor, you'll need a case that supports said design. Beyond that it's really going to be a question of being big enough to hold everything that you're going to be putting in it including extra disk drives, hard drives, sound cards, etc.


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Hyeokgeose
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18 Aug 2018, 12:31 am

I was looking into AMD, but I've found similar prices for both now. Currently looking at i7-8700k, but now I'm wondering if that CPU will pair well with the next series of nVidia cards, since I would like to upgrade in a year. Taking upgrading into consideration, is it known if the next generation of GPUs will be compatible with any of the current motherboards?


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-Stefán Karl Stefánsson
10 July, 1975 - 21 August, 2018.


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18 Aug 2018, 1:11 am

I'm super late, my main daily driver is a Linux 'Utrabook'. I did find out I could buy an AMD thinkpad but I'm not sure what I could get for my $$.

I want to build a Xeon x gtx1080 X maybe Quadro tower in a beige Dell XPS tower. Why not?


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18 Aug 2018, 2:59 pm

Hyeokgeose wrote:
I am looking for a processor, too, as well as specific case recommendations.

Cases are tricky. The last time I bought one, I wanted a beige one without windows/LEDs/etc. and I had only one option to choose from >_< Have you checked NewEgg or Tiger Direct? I got most of my stuff from one of them (can't recall which). Definitely find somewhere with free shipping, because the weight of the case makes shipping pretty expensive.

Hyeokgeose wrote:
Taking upgrading into consideration, is it known if the next generation of GPUs will be compatible with any of the current motherboards?

As far as I know, PCIe isn't going anywhere soon.

You're more likely to have issues with driver support for Windows 7. I'm not sure about Vista, but I know a lot of video drivers dropped support for XP a while back.

Running older nVidia drivers in XP has been alright for me, but I know when I was running ATI graphics, the XP drivers were a bit broken regarding HDMI support.


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Hyeokgeose
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18 Aug 2018, 5:05 pm

SabbraCadabra wrote:
Hyeokgeose wrote:
I am looking for a processor, too, as well as specific case recommendations.

Cases are tricky. The last time I bought one, I wanted a beige one without windows/LEDs/etc. and I had only one option to choose from >_< Have you checked NewEgg or Tiger Direct? I got most of my stuff from one of them (can't recall which). Definitely find somewhere with free shipping, because the weight of the case makes shipping pretty expensive.

Hyeokgeose wrote:
Taking upgrading into consideration, is it known if the next generation of GPUs will be compatible with any of the current motherboards?

As far as I know, PCIe isn't going anywhere soon.

You're more likely to have issues with driver support for Windows 7. I'm not sure about Vista, but I know a lot of video drivers dropped support for XP a while back.

Running older nVidia drivers in XP has been alright for me, but I know when I was running ATI graphics, the XP drivers were a bit broken regarding HDMI support.


I've looked around, but I suppose I am uncertain as to what I am looking for in a case. Maybe I am overthinking airflow, just want to keep things nice and cool (which might not be problematic since I won't overclock anything).

As for driver support, I really did not think about that. The video card that I currently have on my shelf is compatible with Windows 7. Maybe I shouldn't get the 8700k, I just read that it does not support windows 7.


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-Stefán Karl Stefánsson
10 July, 1975 - 21 August, 2018.


Hyeokgeose
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21 Aug 2018, 5:34 am

I just realized, I completely ignored sound cards -- are they needed? I would like to be able to listen to music in high quality. I know most motherboards have decent sound.

I'd also like to be able to eventually use this upcoming PC to record music.


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"It’s not until they tell you you’re going to die soon that you realize how short life is. Time is the most valuable thing in life because it never comes back. And whether you spend it in the arms of a loved one or alone in a prison-cell, life is what you make of it. Dream big."
-Stefán Karl Stefánsson
10 July, 1975 - 21 August, 2018.


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21 Aug 2018, 6:27 am

If you're wanting to record music, a USB audio interface is probably the best way to go. These days, internal cards only really come into their own if you want pro-studio numbers of inputs and outputs or better quality than would make any sense for a home studio. So, as long as your motherboard sound is good enough for the time being, you can add external audio for a home recording studio any time later with whatever combination of line, microphone and instrument inputs and headphone amplifiers etc. that you want. So I'd say that this should be quite low on your priorities for now, concentrate on building a good, reliably running box for everything else that you want to do; you'll have no problem adding high quality music recording later. The other components you've mentioned will be plenty to get you up and running.

However, if you are thinking of recording acoustic instruments, bear in mind that fan noise gets picked up pretty easily by high-quality microphones if they're in the same room, and trying to clean it up "in the mix" is difficult and never works perfectly. Multiple/bigger-diameter cooling fans which run more slowly are generally quieter, and good airflow will allow you to run them slower. You could also look either for an acoustically damped case, or damping kits which attach to the inside of the case, to muffle the sound of fans, clicking hard-drives etc.; and consider an SSD for your audio data. If you have space, a cheaper solution might be to run cables into a separate recording room, and use a smart-phone to remote control the recording software. Similarly, for acoustic recordings and accurate mixing, throwing lots of money at high end music kit is pointless if the room itself has bad acoustics, especially at the bass end. Cheaper kit and a bit of acoustic treatment to the room often sounds much better.


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21 Aug 2018, 8:15 pm

Hyeokgeose wrote:
I know most motherboards have decent sound.

I'd also like to be able to eventually use this upcoming PC to record music.

Yes, most integrated audio these days is pretty decent.

I've been using integrated audio to record music for a long time now...it does a decent job, but if you're trying to make your own multi-track recordings, you will have a few milliseconds of delay, so you'll have to adjust the sync by hand a lot of the time. ASIO4ALL helps a lot, but I've had issues with it with certain hardware and software.

I bought an old Audigy 2, which is supposed to have built-in ASIO, but it has a lot of its own issues, so I haven't gotten it set up yet.

Trogluddite wrote:
However, if you are thinking of recording acoustic instruments, bear in mind that fan noise gets picked up pretty easily by high-quality microphones if they're in the same room...

I've actually never had this problem before. I expect it to happen (and my desktop's fan isn't the quietest), but I've never noticed it being picked up at all.

Dirty power in my guitar amp, however, that's a whole different story >_< Thorn. In. My. Side.

I also tend to pick up the noise of my knuckles hitting the body of my acoustic guitar, or I've tried recording in my computer chair before, thinking "if I just sit really still, it won't squeak..." :roll:


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Hyeokgeose
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22 Aug 2018, 12:13 am

I guess I should've specified the instruments, they are an electric bass guitar & an older electric piano (piano has no USB compatibility, has that other type of port which I forgot the name of). Another device I will be using does have USB compatibility, so it won't be a problem.

Thank you for the very helpful information on music Trogluddite! And thank you for your input too Sabbra! :mrgreen:
Thank you all for the advice/help so far! :heart:


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-Stefán Karl Stefánsson
10 July, 1975 - 21 August, 2018.