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BeaArthur
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01 Sep 2018, 9:50 pm

If you have an adult child and they marry, what do you call their spouse's parents?

The parents are mother-in-law and father-in-law to your adult child. But what are they to you?

Is there a word for it?


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02 Sep 2018, 12:06 am

people to be seen ideally only during holidays.


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naturalplastic
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02 Sep 2018, 8:06 am

That's a head scratcher.

If your child is say, your daughter, then you will just have to call them "my daughter's parents-in-law".

Except for some reason you don't even ever hear the expression "parents-in-law" .

Its always either more specific (my mother in law, my father in law), or its less specific ( "my in laws"). Go figure. So I guess you hafta say "My son/daughter's mother-in-law and father-in-law are coming over for thanksgiving".

When the daughter of my first cousin comes up in conversation I sometimes call her "my niece" even though I always knew that that isn't quite right. So I looked it up on line and learned that in fact she is my "first cousin once removed", and that I am not her "uncle" but that I am her "first cousin once removed" as well. Our kinship labels for each other are exactly the same. Learn sumpin new every day. So I guess you will hafta go online too.



BeaArthur
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02 Sep 2018, 8:40 am

naturalplastic wrote:
When the daughter of my first cousin comes up in conversation I sometimes call her "my niece" even though I always knew that that isn't quite right. So I looked it up on line and learned that in fact she is my "first cousin once removed", and that I am not her "uncle" but that I am her "first cousin once removed" as well. Our kinship labels for each other are exactly the same. Learn sumpin new every day. So I guess you will hafta go online too.

One thing I've learned about cousins once removed, etc., is you can properly just call them "cousins" without specifying the exact relationship, unless that amount of detail is needed. In genealogy, medical risk, and marriage laws, it might be necessary to say once removed, second cousin, etc., but otherwise cousin is perfectly acceptable.


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amdedinboro
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02 Sep 2018, 2:45 pm

Had to look it up, but technically it's a co-parent-in-law. Though I've never once heard that used in conversation :D



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02 Sep 2018, 4:41 pm

Your "daughter's in-laws" would be the common explanation.


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kraftiekortie
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02 Sep 2018, 4:55 pm

In-laws lol



BeaArthur
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02 Sep 2018, 5:58 pm

amdedinboro wrote:
Had to look it up, but technically it's a co-parent-in-law. Though I've never once heard that used in conversation :D

I've never heard that expression before, either. Where did you find it?


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Raleigh
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02 Sep 2018, 8:29 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
In-laws lol

Well, that's the Aussie usage.

Better in-laws than outlaws.


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amdedinboro
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02 Sep 2018, 11:13 pm

BeaArthur wrote:
amdedinboro wrote:
Had to look it up, but technically it's a co-parent-in-law. Though I've never once heard that used in conversation :D

I've never heard that expression before, either. Where did you find it?

Just googled what it would be called, I think it came up in Wiktionary maybe.



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03 Sep 2018, 3:20 am

Over here you would say ''The in-laws''
where as your daughter would say ''My in-laws''



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03 Sep 2018, 3:21 am

Raleigh wrote:
kraftiekortie wrote:
In-laws lol

Well, that's the Aussie usage.

Better in-laws than outlaws.


But Aussies are all outlaws :D



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03 Sep 2018, 5:56 am

Just " family in law"


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04 Sep 2018, 7:40 am

An interesting comment from a website that asked the same question a few years ago:

Quote:
Although they are Greek words, sympatheroi (plural), sympathera (feminine singular) and sympatheros (masculine singular) could work well. The words mean "my child's parent(s)-in-law", literally "co-parent(s)". They are used in the first person (Hello, Sympathera!) as well as the third person.

Sympatheroi has a niche use in the Uniform Parish Regulations of the Greek Orthodox Church in America:

"Relatives are not permitted to serve on the parish council at the same time. Relatives means spouses, parents and children, siblings, and sympatheroi."

English has symphony, but hasn't yet adopted sympatheroi. The reason is probably cultural: English-speaking societies did not place a high value on this relationship, so had no need for a special word for it.

answered Oct 17 '14 at 23:56
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04 Sep 2018, 8:40 am

Collectively, "In-Laws". Singularly, by their first names.



jimmy m
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04 Sep 2018, 9:05 am

I have two daughters who are married. I would generally call them either by their names or by "my daughter's name" father-in-law or "my daughter's name" mother-in-law.


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