INTP Aspies & psychotropic medication

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aspiesavant
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10 Jan 2019, 7:18 am

Some time ago, I came to realize that most Aspies either have an INTJ or INTP personality (see https://www.16personalities.com/ if you don't know wat INTJ & INTP personalities are). At least, that what various polls here on WrongPlanet suggest.

I've also noticed that different forms of psychotropic medications work differently for different individuals. Some respond very well to eg. Adderall, Ritalin, Escitalopram or Venlafaxine. Others respond very badly to those same substances.

Considering the brains of people with different personalities behave in different ways, this is to be expected. However, this could also suggest that medication should have similar effects for people with the same personality.

Personality, I'm INTP. I'm also an Aspie. And if you are an INTP Aspie as well, I'd like to know if you've taken any medication eg. for improving your focus or dealing with anxiety/stress related issue, and how you respond to it.

I'm thinking about trying some new medication myself, and before I visit a shrink I'd like to get an idea of what type of medication would be suitable for an INTP Aspie like myself.



Prometheus18
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10 Jan 2019, 8:47 am

I don't think suitability of psychotropic medication has a great deal to do with personality type. What you say re MBTI types is interesting though; I've also noticed the predominance of INTJ/INTP types. I'm INTJ, personally.


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DrAlan
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10 Jan 2019, 8:54 am

I’m taking a very low dose of Citalopram to help with EF deficits around memory and focus - seems to be working.


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ASS-P
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10 Jan 2019, 9:17 am

...?


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aspiesavant
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10 Jan 2019, 9:28 am

Prometheus18 wrote:
I don't think suitability of psychotropic medication has a great deal to do with personality type.


Aren't different personalities the consequence of different "wiring" in our brains?

If so, doesn't similar wiring suggest similar susceptibility to psychotropic meds?

DrAlan wrote:
I’m taking a very low dose of Citalopram to help with EF deficits around memory and focus - seems to be working.


May I assume you are INTP?



Prometheus18
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10 Jan 2019, 10:15 am

aspiesavant wrote:
Prometheus18 wrote:
I don't think suitability of psychotropic medication has a great deal to do with personality type.


Aren't different personalities the consequence of different "wiring" in our brains?

If so, doesn't similar wiring suggest similar susceptibility to psychotropic meds?



I think that's a fallacy, albeit an alluring one. Psychotropic medication acts on parts of the brain comparatively incidental to personality; this is why there are no medications for treating personality disorders.


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- Sartre

The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.
- Henry David Thoreau

Das Glück gehört denen, die sich selbst genügen. Denn alle äußeren Quellen des Glückes und Genusses sind, ihrer Natur nach, höchst unsicher, misslich, vergänglich und dem Zufall unterworfen.
- Arthur Schopenhauer


aspiesavant
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10 Jan 2019, 10:24 am

Prometheus18 wrote:
Psychotropic medication acts on parts of the brain comparatively incidental to personality


In what way are ANY parts of our brain incidental to personality?

How is our personality not the direct consequence of the configuration of our brain?



Prometheus18
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10 Jan 2019, 11:07 am

aspiesavant wrote:
Prometheus18 wrote:
Psychotropic medication acts on parts of the brain comparatively incidental to personality


In what way are ANY parts of our brain incidental to personality?

How is our personality not the direct consequence of the configuration of our brain?


The personality is solely a product of the brain, but the converse does not apply; the brain is concerned with more than solely the personality.


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L'enfer c'est les autres.
- Sartre

The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.
- Henry David Thoreau

Das Glück gehört denen, die sich selbst genügen. Denn alle äußeren Quellen des Glückes und Genusses sind, ihrer Natur nach, höchst unsicher, misslich, vergänglich und dem Zufall unterworfen.
- Arthur Schopenhauer


aspiesavant
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10 Jan 2019, 11:38 am

Prometheus18 wrote:
The personality is solely a product of the brain


OK

Prometheus18 wrote:
ut the converse does not apply; the brain is concerned with more than solely the personality.


Obviously. But that's not what I'm implying.

What I'm implying, is that personality (in the MBTI sense) is defined by the architecture of our brains. And therefore, I would expect people who have a similar brain architecture to respond in a similar way to the same medication.



DrAlan
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10 Jan 2019, 11:57 am

aspiesavant wrote:
May I assume you are INTP?

Yes - I meant to say so :-)


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Midlife ASD realisation - waiting for formal diagnosis.
PhD & material success, burnout, recurring depression.
Finally stopped sending Christmas cards 2018.
INTP
AQ34; EQ16; RQ21
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Aspie Quiz @ rdos.net
Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 129 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 86 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


Prometheus18
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10 Jan 2019, 12:15 pm

aspiesavant wrote:
Prometheus18 wrote:
The personality is solely a product of the brain


OK

Prometheus18 wrote:
ut the converse does not apply; the brain is concerned with more than solely the personality.


Obviously. But that's not what I'm implying.

What I'm implying, is that personality (in the MBTI sense) is defined by the architecture of our brains. And therefore, I would expect people who have a similar brain architecture to respond in a similar way to the same medication.


I don't think there's going to be much in it. It's going to be more of a behavioural than a neurological thing; for instance, as a cerebral, intellectual INTJ, I might find the brain fog that comes with benzo-diazapenes to be less tolerable than an amiable ESFJ. Of course, personality IS an epiphenomenon of the brain, like everything else about the mind, but the connection isn't yet well understood.


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L'enfer c'est les autres.
- Sartre

The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.
- Henry David Thoreau

Das Glück gehört denen, die sich selbst genügen. Denn alle äußeren Quellen des Glückes und Genusses sind, ihrer Natur nach, höchst unsicher, misslich, vergänglich und dem Zufall unterworfen.
- Arthur Schopenhauer


jimmy m
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10 Jan 2019, 12:32 pm

I am probably with Pometheus18 on this one. I would not relate Myers-Briggs personality type with medicine. As a matter of fact I have never used any medicine to treat my Aspie condition, period.

First off, I am an INTP/INTJ Aspie. I have both personality types and use them as the situation warrants. It is a really good combination. If you think of INTP as the character trait called Intelligence and INTJ as the character trait called Wisdom. My INTJ personality steps in to protect my INTP when all logic fails. My INTJ is a learned capability. As an INTJ, I can look at any problem from a variety of different perspectives. It is like a million voices rattling around inside my head to guide me.

Secondly, there are other Aspies who are not INTPs or INTJ. They have evolved the Judging attribute in the way they have grown up and learned.



aspiesavant
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10 Jan 2019, 12:51 pm

DrAlan wrote:
Yes - I meant to say so :-)


May I know what you do professionally?

Prometheus18 wrote:
It's going to be more of a behavioural than a neurological thing; for instance, as a cerebral, intellectual INTJ, I might find the brain fog that comes with benzo-diazapenes to be less tolerable than an amiable ESFJ.


I'm not sure you can isolate the behavioral from the neurological here.

IMO the very reason that you might find the brain fog that comes with benzo-diazapenes to be less tolerable than an ESFJ is mostly the neurological differences between your brain and that of an ESFJ.

jimmy m wrote:
As a matter of fact I have never used any medicine to treat my Aspie condition, period.


It's not so much ASS that I'd like to treat as it is stress tolerance & capacity to focus.

As I programmer, I need a high capacity to focus 40 hours a week, on a 9-to-5 basis (10-to-6 technically), which for me as an INTP induces a lot of stress. So I'm looking for ways to increase the focus while reducing the stress.

jimmy m wrote:
First off, I am an INTP/INTJ Aspie. I have both personality types and use them as the situation warrants. It is a really good combination. If you think of INTP as the character trait called Intelligence and INTJ as the character trait called Wisdom. My INTJ personality steps in to protect my INTP when all logic fails. My INTJ is a learned capability.


I'm not sure it works like that. It's normal to recognize yourself in personality profiles similar to yours, but I don't think you can fit into two different profiles.

There are many overlaps between profiles that have but a letter difference, but there are also many subtle differences when you look at it more closely. For example, I strongly relate with the ways of thinking of both INTJ & INFP people (and I've had friends with both profiles), but I'm still a total INTP myself.



jimmy m
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10 Jan 2019, 1:46 pm

aspiesavant wrote:
jimmy m wrote:
First off, I am an INTP/INTJ Aspie. I have both personality types and use them as the situation warrants. It is a really good combination. If you think of INTP as the character trait called Intelligence and INTJ as the character trait called Wisdom. My INTJ personality steps in to protect my INTP when all logic fails. My INTJ is a learned capability.


I'm not sure it works like that. It's normal to recognize yourself in personality profiles similar to yours, but I don't think you can fit into two different profiles.

There are many overlaps between profiles that have but a letter difference, but there are also many subtle differences when you look at it more closely. For example, I strongly relate with the ways of thinking of both INTJ & INFP people (and I've had friends with both profiles), but I'm still a total INTP myself.


Generally speaking What do type practitioners have to say about raising children of any personality type? Unanimously authors and researchers agree that parents should support and nourish the development of a child's type-based traits rather than attempt to mold them into other types.

But there is a secret here. The avatar on the left is a picture of me. That is what I look like deep inside me. I am 4 or 5 years old. I am in my "pleasing four" stage of childhood development. On the outside I am a 70 old man. I use masking to appear like an adult and to live in an adult world.

In 1955, Einstein passed away. A decade later in his memorial lecture delivered on 13 December 1965, at UNESCO headquarters, nuclear physicist Robert Oppenheimer summarized his impression of Einstein as a person: “He was almost wholly without sophistication and wholly without worldliness ... There was always with him a wonderful purity at once childlike and profoundly stubborn."

So this childlike trait has been described in several savant INTP Aspies. Because I am a child, my brain is still moldable. I have retained a trait called brain plasticity. As a result I can transition between these two states easily. Also when I undergo Myer-Briggs testing I will show up as a strong INTP or INTJ.

This is also why I continue to learn each and every day. I live in a world of wonder.



DrAlan
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10 Jan 2019, 1:51 pm

aspiesavant wrote:
May I know what you do professionally?


Sure, nowadays I work in product management in a telecoms company (satellite based) and I'm doing process engineering / analysis at the moment. The thread running through my career is analysis, algorithms, methods, creativity, plus not being able to bare technology for the sake of technology & asking awkward questions to make people think. Despite my alexithymia and low affective empathy, I have good cognitive empathy and can help often help people from different backgrounds communicate with each-other. I also make people be precise about what they're talking about (because I don't 'get it' otherwise) and this has become a useful skill - because I'll ask the question that everyone else is thinking until things become clear :-)


_________________
Midlife ASD realisation - waiting for formal diagnosis.
PhD & material success, burnout, recurring depression.
Finally stopped sending Christmas cards 2018.
INTP
AQ34; EQ16; RQ21
RAADS-R 145
Aspie Quiz @ rdos.net
Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 129 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 86 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)