Working full-time (or close to full-time)

Page 1 of 2 [ 32 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

blitzkrieg
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jun 2011
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,602
Location: United Kingdom

28 Feb 2019, 5:30 pm

How do people do this? I can just about manage to work about 25 hours a week and keep my sanity. I've recently, however, been offered more hours at my workplace, so I am now working 31 hours per week (after breaks which aren't paid for) - or 35 including them and I am EXHAUSTED. In every imaginable, conceivable way.

I have Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS), Autistic Spectrum Disorder, Tourette's Syndrome, ADHD, depression and anxiety and have been denied disability which I applied for two years ago (still an ongoing case).

I want to work, but I can't see myself working more than maybe 29 hours per week over the long-term as I start to feel seriously ill at that point.

Honest to God feel as though I am being whipped by the corporate idea of 'productivity' with little concern for my wellbeing or illnesses.

Anyone else in a similar position?



Fnord
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 43,992
Location: Stendec

28 Feb 2019, 5:42 pm

blitzkrieg wrote:
How do people do this? ... I have Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS), Autistic Spectrum Disorder, Tourette's Syndrome, ADHD, depression and anxiety and have been denied disability which I applied for two years ago (still an ongoing case) ... Anyone else in a similar position?
Dude, that you can work at all is a credit to your determination!

:salut:



BTDT
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Jul 2010
Age: 57
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,620

28 Feb 2019, 7:51 pm

You are doing good to work that many hours with your issues.

Where I work we don't get overtime, and unpaid overtime is strongly discouraged as well.



Trogluddite
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2016
Age: 49
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,050
Location: Yorkshire, UK

28 Feb 2019, 8:27 pm

I've found that about 25-30 hours is about my maximum, too, and it works best for me to do the hours in a few long working days rather than across many short ones - so that can have entire days of rest and isolation. More hours is a double whammy - lost recovery time is as critical as the extra workload. Any more than that, even in work that's rewarding and in a comfortable environment, and the cumulative effect means that a burn-out is pretty much guaranteed eventually.

As I wear down, it makes my anxiety and depression progressively worse, and my autistic traits become far less manageable. I strip my private life to the bone, and use annual leave for recovery time rather than holidays etc., but it gets to a point where inattentiveness at work and the constant need for sick-leave understandably make me a liability to my employer. I've lost quite a few jobs that way - though I didn't know at the time that they were autistic burnouts, as I wasn't diagnosed yet.

This is without the added demands of CFS or Tourette's, so as Fnord said, it sounds like you're pushing yourself pretty hard already.

This is a point I keep making to careers advisers. The ability to work a full week occasionally doesn't mean that it's sustainable long term. Rest and isolation are the only remedy for burning out that I've ever found - little and often is far more productive for both employer and employee than poor work quality and sick-leave when things start falling apart.


_________________
When you are fighting an invisible monster, first throw a bucket of paint over it.


BTDT
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Jul 2010
Age: 57
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,620

28 Feb 2019, 8:31 pm

Yes, it has to be a sustainable workload.

I also have the luxury of six weeks of vacation and seniority, which means that I can take vacation time pretty much anytime I want. And just call it in instead of of showing up for work that morning.



blitzkrieg
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jun 2011
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,602
Location: United Kingdom

28 Feb 2019, 9:36 pm

BTDT wrote:
You are doing good to work that many hours with your issues.

Where I work we don't get overtime, and unpaid overtime is strongly discouraged as well.


Well, my basic contracted hours have gone up to 31 - it's not overtime (I did that occasionally anyway on top of the previous basic contract of 25 hours p/w).

So God help when I get a week like the other week where I had to do 35. I reckon I'll probably burn out within a few years on these hours. I guess I should save whilst I can.



blitzkrieg
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jun 2011
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,602
Location: United Kingdom

28 Feb 2019, 9:37 pm

BTDT wrote:
Yes, it has to be a sustainable workload.

I also have the luxury of six weeks of vacation and seniority, which means that I can take vacation time pretty much anytime I want. And just call it in instead of of showing up for work that morning.


That's great stuff!



blitzkrieg
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jun 2011
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,602
Location: United Kingdom

28 Feb 2019, 9:40 pm

Trogluddite wrote:
I've found that about 25-30 hours is about my maximum, too, and it works best for me to do the hours in a few long working days rather than across many short ones - so that can have entire days of rest and isolation. More hours is a double whammy - lost recovery time is as critical as the extra workload. Any more than that, even in work that's rewarding and in a comfortable environment, and the cumulative effect means that a burn-out is pretty much guaranteed eventually.

As I wear down, it makes my anxiety and depression progressively worse, and my autistic traits become far less manageable. I strip my private life to the bone, and use annual leave for recovery time rather than holidays etc., but it gets to a point where inattentiveness at work and the constant need for sick-leave understandably make me a liability to my employer. I've lost quite a few jobs that way - though I didn't know at the time that they were autistic burnouts, as I wasn't diagnosed yet.

This is without the added demands of CFS or Tourette's, so as Fnord said, it sounds like you're pushing yourself pretty hard already.

This is a point I keep making to careers advisers. The ability to work a full week occasionally doesn't mean that it's sustainable long term. Rest and isolation are the only remedy for burning out that I've ever found - little and often is far more productive for both employer and employee than poor work quality and sick-leave when things start falling apart.


You make a good point. People think just because you can do a week's work (full-time) - that you can do it long-term. Especially government bureaucrats who want to deny people even small amount of disability payments. I find I'm already using annual leave for rest more than any kind of enjoyment. :cry:



aNewUsername
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

Joined: 22 Feb 2019
Age: 25
Posts: 27
Location: South Australia

01 Mar 2019, 4:03 am

I view more hours as a short-term sacrifice worth struggling through for the long-term.

An example of how I see it is you can work 15hr/weeks for 3 years, or 45hr/weeks for 1year and have 2 years off. Both of these options have the theoretical same income, so I'd personally rather a terrible year followed by two great years, as apposed to 3 bad years.

The reality of it, though, is simple: Everyone has their own optimal balance. You need to find what yours is and aim for it, to live life to the fullest.



Magna
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Jun 2018
Gender: Male
Posts: 6,932

01 Mar 2019, 8:31 am

Based on your challenges I'm very impressed that you're working that much. Coming from most people, that may seem patronising, but I can understand being utterly drained from a typical workday and basic interaction.

I'm going to be starting a job soon in which I'll be working fewer hours (32) but still eligible for benefits. I'll have three day weekends every weekend to rest and recharge.

Since you just started with these hours, do you think it's possible you might get used to them?


_________________
"There is no love of living without despair of life." - Albert Camus

"Ain't nothing but a stranger in this world
I'm nothing but a stranger in this world" -Van Morrison

"Are you Bluish? You don't look Bluish."

AQ-43 (32-50 indicates a strong likelihood of Asperger syndrome or autism).
EQ-14 out of 80
Rdos: Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 173 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 39 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 71,162
Location: Queens, NYC

01 Mar 2019, 11:22 am

What do you do, Blitzkrieg?

I work 55 hours a week within two jobs. Both are not really taxing on the mind, fortunately.

Both my jobs are clerical in nature.



blitzkrieg
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jun 2011
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,602
Location: United Kingdom

04 Mar 2019, 6:05 pm

Oh, I work in retail. But more backstage operations - a lot of warehouse-y, physical type work. Sorting stock, unloading vehicles etc. It's physically tiring and I hope some day to find a job that I can do mentally but which is less tiring.

A boy can dream.



BrokenPieces
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 24 Mar 2017
Gender: Female
Posts: 714
Location: Somewhere only we know.

04 Mar 2019, 6:40 pm

blitzkrieg, I hope your disability goes through. It typically takes at least 2 years to get a hearing. They tend to deny everyone initially. My sister told me her workmate's daughter was severely impaired and wheelchair bound for life and they denied her claim. Only after physically taking her up to the office and saying "does she look like she can work?" did she get approved.

As for working full time, I don't know. I burned out every time I worked 40+ hours. I think it would help if it is enjoyable work. I was doing retail. Not the backroom kind. The other dreadful kind.



blitzkrieg
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jun 2011
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,602
Location: United Kingdom

06 Mar 2019, 7:48 pm

BrokenPieces wrote:
blitzkrieg, I hope your disability goes through. It typically takes at least 2 years to get a hearing. They tend to deny everyone initially. My sister told me her workmate's daughter was severely impaired and wheelchair bound for life and they denied her claim. Only after physically taking her up to the office and saying "does she look like she can work?" did she get approved.

As for working full time, I don't know. I burned out every time I worked 40+ hours. I think it would help if it is enjoyable work. I was doing retail. Not the backroom kind. The other dreadful kind.


Me too. It's only a few thousand a year I'm looking to get anyway, hardly something to live off. It's ridiculous that it's gone on so long, already.

Yeah, I've done that kind of retail work before and I know how dreadful it can be. It's like hell. :D



cberg
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 31 Dec 2011
Gender: Male
Posts: 11,299
Location: Boulder CO

06 Mar 2019, 8:40 pm

I don't know how the hell I manage 40 hours at a PC. I know it's ultimately bad for me. I'd just make everyone miserable if I brought up my health problems & diagnoses.


_________________
"Standing on a well-chilled cinder, we see the fading of the suns, and try to recall the vanished brilliance of the origin of the worlds."
-Georges Lemaitre
"I fly through hyperspace, in my green computer interface"
-Gem Tos :mrgreen:


1986
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

Joined: 28 Mar 2018
Gender: Male
Posts: 166

07 Mar 2019, 8:57 am

I work 60-70 hours a week. My vocation used to be my special interest, which explains why I can work quite a lot. It largely got replaced by other interests once I entered the workforce -- and had to work in teams. Now I'm trying to rediscover the special interest while also doing the necessary social acrobatics. It's quite difficult so far ...


_________________
Diagnosed AS 2012. Schizoaffective Disorder, Depressive Type 2015. Lives in Tokyo 2015-