Page 1 of 1 [ 7 posts ] 

PaulHubert
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

User avatar

Joined: 28 Mar 2014
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 77
Location: Charlotte

08 May 2019, 9:56 pm

Why should (or would) a fresh programmer deliberately decide to take the path of C#/.Net over Java with the Java market booming right now?



Seaspray
Butterfly
Butterfly

Joined: 6 Oct 2017
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Posts: 11
Location: Calgary, Alberta

09 May 2019, 12:10 am

The Java market isn't booming, it's a resource hog on any system I've used it. I need 16 gibibytes of RAM in my laptop just to run Android Studio and Visual Studio Code at the same time, among everything else I have open. The only market I see Java developers wanted right now is Android and that isn't even pure Java anymore, it requires special knowledge of their proprietary views and intents.

.NET, as much as I hate it, is much more popular right now and pays a lot better in my experience. I just refuse to work with anything Microsoft because I don't want my blood pressure to increase.



PaulHubert
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

User avatar

Joined: 28 Mar 2014
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 77
Location: Charlotte

19 May 2019, 7:35 pm

Definitely not the case in the states, at least going outside of of the west coast, this is what I've heard from others talking to recruiters on linkedin.



Kurgan
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Apr 2012
Age: 30
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,379
Location: Scandinavia

21 May 2019, 10:26 am

For starters, Java support is no longer free. Furthermore, Unity (which most 3D apps use these days) uses C#.


_________________
“He who controls the spice controls the universe.”


void1A4
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

Joined: 9 Oct 2018
Age: 23
Posts: 8
Location: seattle area

25 May 2019, 6:10 pm

A lot of it is local markets, ie there's a lot of .NET roles around Redmond. Maybe they could pay differently.
I thought there were still plenty of Java roles.



techstepgenr8tion
SomeRandomGuy
SomeRandomGuy

User avatar

Joined: 6 Feb 2005
Age: 39
Gender: Male
Posts: 20,936
Location: The 27th Path of Peh.

28 May 2019, 12:43 pm

This probably depends on where you want to program.

For what I understand a lot of the business world likes .Net/.Net Core and MVC.

In the environment I'm in we've actually extended this (not really sure if it makes that much sense but it seems to be what the clients want) to have .Net Core as the back end and Angular 7 as our front end.

That might even be worthy of it's own thread - how significant is the letup on server resources with Angular front-ends as opposed to Razor? Enough to justify the inconveniences?


_________________
"The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. To be your own man is a hard business. If you try it, you'll be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. But no price is too high to pay for the privelege of owning yourself" - Rudyard Kipling


ZETATHON
Butterfly
Butterfly

Joined: 30 May 2019
Gender: Male
Posts: 10

07 Jun 2019, 7:32 am

The two are so similar it is possible to learn and use both. I've programmed commercially in Java but, at home, I prefer C# for my own projects. I never liked Visual Studio based on my past experiences with C++. But with C#, I actually found that I loved it (much better than Eclipse).

One of the disadvantages of C# used to be that it was very limited on Linux (via Mono) and it was difficult to write useful cross platform code. However, all this has changed in recent years with DotNet Core 2.0.



cron