Difference in support in Level 1 and Level 2 Autism?

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31 May 2019, 5:22 am

I'm curious, what support is someone with Level 2 Autism entitled to that someone with Level 1 wouldn't be?

I can imagine the support a Level 3 would need but Level 2 is more vague to me so just wondered how it would differ to a Level 1.

Thanks



naturalplastic
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31 May 2019, 5:47 am

If you cant dress yourself, and cant go to the bathroom by yourself then your level 3.

If you can do all of the above, but cant drive, or grocery shop for yourself, then your level 2.

If you can dress yourself, go to to the bathroom by yourself, and even grocery shop for yourself, and drive a car by yourself, a just generally blend into society, but you cant get promoted to middle management - which would enable you to earn a living wage, then you're level one.

+++++++++++

I just made up the above criteria myself off of the top of my head. Its not in the DSM or anything. But I bet that the way they break it down is something like that.



losingit1973
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31 May 2019, 10:11 am

naturalplastic wrote:
If you cant dress yourself, and cant go to the bathroom by yourself then your level 3.

If you can do all of the above, but cant drive, or grocery shop for yourself, then your level 2.

If you can dress yourself, go to to the bathroom by yourself, and even grocery shop for yourself, and drive a car by yourself, a just generally blend into society, but you cant get promoted to middle management - which would enable you to earn a living wage, then you're level one.

+++++++++++

I just made up the above criteria myself off of the top of my head. Its not in the DSM or anything. But I bet that the way they break it down is something like that.

Nicely said. Plain english, and real world context.


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SaveFerris
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31 May 2019, 10:16 am

I would say I am Level 1 99% of the time but occasionally appear Level 2.


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Arganger
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31 May 2019, 10:54 am

Depends on the person.


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EzraS
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31 May 2019, 11:44 am

When someone is level 2 it is pretty clear they are autistic. They were diagnosed at an early age. They are usually able to talk but in a way that makes it pretty obvious they have autism. A level 2 adult pretty much requires the same supervision and support as a minor child and also has a lot of the same limitations.



firemonkey
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31 May 2019, 12:37 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
If you cant dress yourself, and cant go to the bathroom by yourself then your level 3.

If you can do all of the above, but cant drive, or grocery shop for yourself, then your level 2.

If you can dress yourself, go to to the bathroom by yourself, and even grocery shop for yourself, and drive a car by yourself, a just generally blend into society, but you cant get promoted to middle management - which would enable you to earn a living wage, then you're level one.

+++++++++++

I just made up the above criteria myself off of the top of my head. Its not in the DSM or anything. But I bet that the way they break it down is something like that.


I'm not sure if you're being tongue in cheek about level 1 and 2. I can get to the small local supermarket , as it's less than 5 minutes walk away in a rather straight path . For a big shop though I'm dependent on my stepdaughter . She drives me there,guides me round the aisles and packs the groceries at the checkout. The only practical thing I'm ok at is managing money. If left to my own devices I struggle to keep a place from turning into a sh*t heap.


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SaveFerris
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31 May 2019, 12:54 pm

firemonkey wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
If you cant dress yourself, and cant go to the bathroom by yourself then your level 3.

If you can do all of the above, but cant drive, or grocery shop for yourself, then your level 2.

If you can dress yourself, go to to the bathroom by yourself, and even grocery shop for yourself, and drive a car by yourself, a just generally blend into society, but you cant get promoted to middle management - which would enable you to earn a living wage, then you're level one.

+++++++++++

I just made up the above criteria myself off of the top of my head. Its not in the DSM or anything. But I bet that the way they break it down is something like that.


I'm not sure if you're being tongue in cheek about level 1 and 2. I can get to the small local supermarket , as it's less than 5 minutes walk away in a rather straight path . For a big shop though I'm dependent on my stepdaughter . She drives me there,guides me round the aisles and packs the groceries at the checkout. The only practical thing I'm ok at is managing money. If left to my own devices I struggle to keep a place from turning into a sh*t heap.


Don't worry about level description FM ,

Quote:
the DSM-5 explains that ‘severity’ levels may vary by context and also fluctuate over time, that the descriptive severity categories should not be used to determine eligibility for and provision of services, and that 'these can only be developed at an individual level and through discussion of personal priorities and targets.


You should be given the help you need after diagnosis as long as it is provided in your county ( postcode lottery I'm afraid ).


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firemonkey
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31 May 2019, 1:19 pm

Yes ,it's a definite postcode lottery. I had to phone to change the post diagnostic appointment the other day . I got the secretary, but the woman who does the session wasn't available.
The woman phoned back today . She was thrown that July was the time I could get to an appointment ,as I'm reliant on my stepdaughter taking me. She told me quite clearly that they like to get people off their books as quickly as possible.
Post diagnostic help is helpful approaches, and signposting to support services. A search of Google doesn't bring up much for adults in Wiltshire.

Luckily I have good support thanks to my stepdaughter who realises I have issues with day to day coping.She was the one who backed me up when I mentioned autism at my last psych appointment in October. As someone who works in the care industry she's had dealings with people on the spectrum. She's currently deputy manager of 3 care homes for people with intellectual disabilities. Some of whom are probably level3 on the spectrum. I'm functioning much better here than I was in Essex. Having the diagnosis will strengthen the need to maintain that support.


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31 May 2019, 1:29 pm

^ fingers crossed for you FM , your step-daughter sounds like she'll get you the help you need if it's available. New autism help programmes ? ( don't know what else to call them ) are being set up all the time. I was shocked to find a new one started in my area.


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firemonkey
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31 May 2019, 1:31 pm

Thanks @SaveFerris.


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BaronHarkonnen85
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31 May 2019, 1:45 pm

I'm Level 2 and can drive.

I also wasn't diagnosed until I was an adult. Granted, some teachers in elementary school suspected some kind of issue. According to my grandmother, who is not a reliable source, they thought I was retarded. Something tells me she interpreted "developmental disability" as retarded. That sounds like something she would do. Ironically, I've noticed she has some symptoms herself, despite not being diagnosed.

Something tells me my parents and grandparents ignored it and lived in denial.

When I tried telling my mother that something was wrong with me, she didn't want to believe me. I begged her to send me to a doctor but she wouldn't.

I had to save my own christmas/birthday money for 3 years and buy my own health insurance to get a diagnoses.


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firemonkey
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31 May 2019, 2:04 pm

If based on purely ASD symptoms I'd probably be level 1. Throw in the other things like dyspraxia(probable- but not diagnosed) , learning difficulty(probable -but not diagnosed) and severe mental illness( Since 1975) I'd most likely be level 2.


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31 May 2019, 2:28 pm

If I was diagnosed, at a guess from the description I would be level one and a half. I seem to have deteriated with age if that is possible? I can drive ok, but it is trying to work is the issue.
I don't need money anyway. If I get into difficulties I will likely give up, as I have no fight left in me these days. I am so priveledged to have my Mum.
In the past I used to cope much better. I think I was much better at masking? No idea. I just know I used to cope with things where I just can't believe how I did it.

On the bright side, I have learned so much about myself and this is starting to make a difference. I don't get so wound up inside as I realize that people are people. At one time I felt that everyone on the planet was against me except for my Mum, as I felt no one understands me. But there again, I didn't understand myself, so how can I then expect others to understand me if I don't understand myself?


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31 May 2019, 3:21 pm

I was diagnosed in 1st grade.
I dont know what level I am,
I blend well I guess, which is itself a curse. I can drive,but can’t afford a car, I can go to stores but I don’t unless with family, or stoping at small store next to my work. I don’t plan food well and over spend my budget sometimes. Perhaps a meal plan would help. I dont know.
I can’t make any friends and have no friends. I stay silent a lot in public.


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firemonkey
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31 May 2019, 4:25 pm

I am a very limited food planner(organising and planning generally are weaknesses of mine) . I'm trying to eat a little better, but am seeing my food bill shoot up.
For the last 2 months or so I've been buying 2 stir fry packs + meat and sauce(2 meals) , and either chicken cooked in a bag with sweet potato wedges and microwave veg or Old El Paso one pot rice with frozen shallots,frozen mixed peppers and cubed chicken (2 days meals each) .


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