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TazCrystal
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
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Joined: 17 May 2019
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Location: Los Angeles

12 Jun 2019, 1:58 pm

I have been having meltdowns since I was really small. I still don't know how to deal with them though.
It was horrible at school. I used to have them almost every school week. I also had teachers who really didn't understand. They thought I was misbehaving. I used to get in trouble for it. In high school it was the same. I just got really overwhelmed a lot and I didn't know what to do. Now I still have them and they come out as rage. It sucks. I end up sleeping afterwards most of the time. A lot of people still think I am misbehaving. I want to not have them but its hard to control and I also have issues with communicating and people don't understand what I mean sometimes and it really stresses me out. I also have impulse problems. I have an understanding caretaker and parents though.



madbutnotmad
Deinonychus
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Joined: 20 Nov 2016
Age: 46
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Location: Jersey UK

12 Jun 2019, 2:11 pm

I have been told by some CBT people, that there are methods to help.
Although i have to say that i have not found any myself.

I have read into the cause of ASD based meltdowns, as there are all sorts of factors that cause them.
Each which are very particular to the individual.

One of the main issues that makes it hard for people with ASD to cope with meltdowns, is that part of the brain
that gives normal people the ability to cope with stress, is damaged.

The ASD brain usually has a limited capacity for stress, and in many cases, people with ASD take in more sensory information than normal people.

The combination of no coping skills + little capacity for stress + extra stress from sensory stimuli + problems with communication = high possibility for meltdown

I read that meltdowns, once started are very hard to stop and need to be left to take their due course.
So, I guess the best outcome in terms of management is to learn what triggers meltdowns and then try and avoid them if you can.

For example. if noise triggers sensory overload. try and sound proof your flat.
If busy environments cause overload, try and avoid such environments.



TazCrystal
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

Joined: 17 May 2019
Gender: Male
Posts: 58
Location: Los Angeles

12 Jun 2019, 3:12 pm

madbutnotmad wrote:
I have been told by some CBT people, that there are methods to help.
Although i have to say that i have not found any myself.

I have read into the cause of ASD based meltdowns, as there are all sorts of factors that cause them.
Each which are very particular to the individual.

One of the main issues that makes it hard for people with ASD to cope with meltdowns, is that part of the brain
that gives normal people the ability to cope with stress, is damaged.

The ASD brain usually has a limited capacity for stress, and in many cases, people with ASD take in more sensory information than normal people.

The combination of no coping skills + little capacity for stress + extra stress from sensory stimuli + problems with communication = high possibility for meltdown

I read that meltdowns, once started are very hard to stop and need to be left to take their due course.
So, I guess the best outcome in terms of management is to learn what triggers meltdowns and then try and avoid them if you can.

For example. if noise triggers sensory overload. try and sound proof your flat.
If busy environments cause overload, try and avoid such environments.


Thank you. I have been trying to find methods to deal with them better. Its hard. I understand the part about coping with stress. I have a lot of extra stress and I noticed that people in my family and other people seem to deal with their stress in a better way. Yeah, meltdowns are nearly impossible to stop when I get them it seems. I sometimes try to stop them myself but I get even more stressed out. Noise and busy environments cause me to feel very stressed out. I have meltdowns because of those things. I also had meltdowns when I was in speech therapy. I notice that my communication problems cause the most meltdowns though. I think it is because I speak quietly and I don't always word my sentences in the correct order. I get really frustrated with myself when I cannot speak properly. I am working on slowing down when I speak. That's hard though. I talk so much to people I am comfortable around.



jimmy m
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12 Jun 2019, 3:19 pm

I agree with what madbutnotmad has already said. The primary cause is stress overload. Stress is cumulative in nature. If you can learn techniques to vent stress energy, then you can reduce or defuse meltdowns.



PoseyBuster88
Blue Jay
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Joined: 17 Mar 2019
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12 Jun 2019, 8:38 pm

I think I read on another thread someone who had a heartrate monitor that would buzz if it got too fast. That helped them identify when they were starting to get stressed, so they could leave the situation. Maybe something like that would help? It would also help you identify more triggers.


_________________
~AQ 32; not formally diagnosed.~


Sam64
Butterfly
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Joined: 29 May 2019
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13 Jun 2019, 3:41 pm

PoseyBuster88 wrote:
I think I read on another thread someone who had a heartrate monitor that would buzz if it got too fast. That helped them identify when they were starting to get stressed, so they could leave the situation. Maybe something like that would help? It would also help you identify more triggers.


Hmm, I think having something like that to analyse would actually stress me more. :lol:



madbutnotmad
Deinonychus
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Posts: 396
Location: Jersey UK

14 Jun 2019, 1:26 pm

I think that meltdown avoidance strategies are different in people with ASD than normal people even those with mental illness.

This I believe is because of the fundamental difference in how the ASD persons brain is "wired" and due to damage that exists in the areas of the brain that gives normal people the ability to cope.

Some meltdowns sadly are unavoidable.

Others, however, may be "managed" best by employing avoidance strategies and perhaps Occupational therapy devices.

Like I say, avoiding or blocking out triggers would be useful. Soundproofing, headphones, ear defenders, ear plugs and avoiding the sound sources altogether (for those who are sensitive to sound). Lighting adaptations, sunglasses and avoidance for people who are sensitive to fluorescent lights etc. and the list goes on.


There are some triggers which may be hard to avoid, such as when problems with communication occur, or other complex psychological aspects which may be found if employed such as bullying in the workplace (as inevitably happens to a high number of people with ASD) and inability to cope with pressure. These issues I do not know of any strategies to cope with, but if you live in a country that offers employment support for people with disabilities, then such support may be useful as well as talking with an Occupational Therapist.


You may also gain benefit from taking part in activities that are known to reduce stress levels.

The ones I know of include, spending time in nature (around green fields very therapeutic),
doing moderate exercise is known to reduce stress levels and boost testosterone slightly,
eating a healthy diet that is low in anxiety inducing triggers, *1
relaxation therapies such as mindfulness meditation and body scan meditation *2


*1: there are many food stuff's that are known to cause anxiety. In particular foods that include stimulants such a caffeine (coffee, soda), foods such as strong cheese etc, and excessive amounts of alcohol especially if used on a daily basis. Also, having diet deficient in some food stuff will lead you to an unbalanced diet that is deficient in certain essential vitamins and minerals. Some deficiencies can make a person more anxious and tired. If you do not drink much water, that often can make you feel unwell through dehydration, which can also make a person anxious.


2* mindfulness meditation has been around for thousands of years but in more recent years has been adopted by modern psychology and therapists. Such meditation and relaxation therapies are most effective if done every day even if just for a short time. In essence, the meditation or relaxation techniques can be used to stop a person's mind from whizzing out of control in the first place. And thus give them self control, to help them from getting too wound up.


Out of interest, if you do not want to go to a relaxation or meditation class, but want to still benefit from this type of therapy. You can buy a spoken word guided meditation or relaxation therapy mp3 directly off those who make them or from amazon. If you have an alexa, you can even just ask your Alexa to play one of them.

Word of warning for those who are hypersensitive to sound however, you will need to find a quiet room to play meditation or you will end up getting distracted.

In the past, I have had some good success by practicing meditation but the best success comes from doing it every day for a short period. A discipline in itself. If you can get into a routine then you may very well make a lot of progress. Such meditation can really make you feel really relaxed and in some cases even blissed out.

Hope that helps.



madbutnotmad
Deinonychus
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Joined: 20 Nov 2016
Age: 46
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14 Jun 2019, 1:31 pm

sorry forgot
some people find drinking camomile tea or green tea (ones without caffeine) as beneficial
if you can get use to the taste. I love camomile, but it does have a tendency to cause a dry tickle at the
back of my throat.

The active ingredient from Green Tea called L-Theanine can be brought in capsule or tablet form from
health food shops, and can offer some, some relief.

Apparently it does not cause addiction problems nor do you need to increase the amount over time.
I do not know from experience however.
In some places Kava Kava is legal although apparently this has been proven to toxify the liver.



DanielW
Deinonychus
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14 Jun 2019, 1:44 pm

TazCrystal wrote:
I have been having meltdowns since I was really small. I still don't know how to deal with them though.
It was horrible at school. I used to have them almost every school week. I also had teachers who really didn't understand. They thought I was misbehaving. I used to get in trouble for it. In high school it was the same. I just got really overwhelmed a lot and I didn't know what to do. Now I still have them and they come out as rage. It sucks. I end up sleeping afterwards most of the time. A lot of people still think I am misbehaving. I want to not have them but its hard to control and I also have issues with communicating and people don't understand what I mean sometimes and it really stresses me out. I also have impulse problems. I have an understanding caretaker and parents though.


Learning to self-regulate your response to stressful situations is possible. Its something I am working on with a therapist now.