How many feel the costs of arts programs are barriers?

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JustFoundHere
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10 Jul 2019, 11:40 pm

How many people feel that the costs of arts programs are barriers to participation?

Personally, I feel most confident about developing acquaintances through arts-programs.

Too many arts programs are both too costly and formal - that is an artist-led programs are only for one to three costly (around $100 U.S.) few hour sessions. An affordable option would be free-style (more of less informal) arts instruction.

Many arts-programs can do well by offering (more of less informal) arts instruction for sessions running several weeks at affordable costs. In other words, why not schedule programs for adults....similar to programs already popular with kids?

Our locally-owned art supply store indicated that our local museum might be receptive to adding affordable free-style art sessions for adults.



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11 Jul 2019, 9:00 am

Are you expecting arts programs to be free? Who will pay for the supplies and classroom rental? How will the arts teacher make a living?


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JustFoundHere
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11 Jul 2019, 12:28 pm

Fnord wrote:
Are you expecting arts programs to be free? Who will pay for the supplies and classroom rental? How will the arts teacher make a living?


Please reassess original post: Affordable arts classes. More or less informal arts classes may cost less than the formal-orientated arts classes.



Fnord
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11 Jul 2019, 1:08 pm

JustFoundHere wrote:
Fnord wrote:
Are you expecting arts programs to be free? Who will pay for the supplies and classroom rental? How will the arts teacher make a living?
Please reassess original post: Affordable arts classes. More or less informal arts classes may cost less than the formally-oriented arts classes.
How do you intend to make arts classes more affordable?


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shortfatbalduglyman
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11 Jul 2019, 3:45 pm

The cost of art programs are "barriers"

The cost of everything, including food,, especially food are "barriers"

Yes

Capitalism

Government won't subsidize your art lessons


College financial aid

Art major



JustFoundHere
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11 Jul 2019, 5:03 pm

Fnord wrote:
JustFoundHere wrote:
Fnord wrote:
Are you expecting arts programs to be free? Who will pay for the supplies and classroom rental? How will the arts teacher make a living?
Please reassess original post: Affordable arts classes. More or less informal arts classes may cost less than the formally-oriented arts classes.
How do you intend to make arts classes more affordable?


In detail (moderate-length read):

Locations in, or near large metro-areas have diverse arts- programs; some of which are available to participants on a budget.

Arts programs that don't hire established artists can keep costs down; as established artist instructors can be pricey.

I knew of an artist who had an arts credential, and offered informal free-style arts instruction to developmentally disabled adults. Unfortunately, this artist had to relocate to another community.

First of all, an art-instructor with an arts credential (whose probably not an established artist) can be dedicated; even though they don't get paid at the same level as established artists.

Second of all, an informal free-style arts program would cost less than a formal arts program. An arts-credentialed instructor would discuss objectives, and advise and encourage follow-through for each participant; hence an arts-program that's well.......too free-style might not be a good option.

An established artist (again, a pricey option) would probably want to offer a formal class requiring participants to closely follow a step-by-step approach in drawing, painting, etc.

Many people might be discouraged by such formal step-by-step options.

Meetup.com may have arts programs, as well as encouraging the development of programs. Internet access can boost local networking in finding, and encouraging interested arts participants.

'Makerspace' programs in many communities are resources to investigate (LINK bottom of page).

Community colleges, parks & recreation might have affordable informal "free style" programs.

In short, it's likely a "hard sell of sorts" to encourage interest in the more or less formal/informal art's programs; that is arts program providers would ask that a minimum number of participants commit to classes/workshops running for several weeks in order to make actual classes practical.

As I mentioned , I asked about arts programs at our locally-owned art supply store. They indicated that our local museum might be receptive to adding affordable free-style art sessions for adults.

LINK: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Library_makerspace

Any specific art-program experiences?



Fnord
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11 Jul 2019, 7:05 pm

JustFoundHere wrote:
... Any specific art-program experiences?
Music lessons. I found that after learning the basics, the best way to learn was to buy an old hymnal at a yard sale and practice the music inside by myself.


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JustFoundHere
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12 Jul 2019, 2:04 pm

JustFoundHere wrote:
Fnord wrote:
JustFoundHere wrote:
Fnord wrote:
Are you expecting arts programs to be free? Who will pay for the supplies and classroom rental? How will the arts teacher make a living?
Please reassess original post: Affordable arts classes. More or less informal arts classes may cost less than the formally-oriented arts classes.
How do you intend to make arts classes more affordable?


In detail (moderate-length read):

Locations in, or near large metro-areas have diverse arts- programs; some of which are available to participants on a budget.

Arts programs that don't hire established artists can keep costs down; as established artist instructors can be pricey.

I knew of an artist who had an arts credential, and offered informal free-style arts instruction to developmentally disabled adults. Unfortunately, this artist had to relocate to another community.

First of all, an art-instructor with an arts credential (whose probably not an established artist) can be dedicated; even though they don't get paid at the same level as established artists.

Second of all, an informal free-style arts program would cost less than a formal arts program. An arts-credentialed instructor would discuss objectives, and advise and encourage follow-through for each participant; hence an arts-program that's well.......too free-style might not be a good option.

An established artist (again, a pricey option) would probably want to offer a formal class requiring participants to closely follow a step-by-step approach in drawing, painting, etc.

Many people might be discouraged by such formal step-by-step options.

Meetup.com may have arts programs, as well as encouraging the development of programs. Internet access can boost local networking in finding, and encouraging interested arts participants.

'Makerspace' programs in many communities are resources to investigate (LINK bottom of page).

Community colleges, parks & recreation might have affordable informal "free style" programs.

In short, it's likely a "hard sell of sorts" to encourage interest in the more or less formal/informal art's programs; that is arts program providers would ask that a minimum number of participants commit to classes/workshops running for several weeks in order to make actual classes practical.

As I mentioned , I asked about arts programs at our locally-owned art supply store. They indicated that our local museum might be receptive to adding affordable free-style art sessions for adults.

LINK: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Library_makerspace

Any specific art-program experiences?


ADDENDUM: As mentioned, it's likely a "hard sell of sorts" to boost arts program options. In short, be the change we need to see in our own arts communities!