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Goob234
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23 Aug 2019, 7:01 am

Does your concrete thinking ever make you feel like you are not as smart as your peers who are abstract thinkers?


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kraftiekortie
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23 Aug 2019, 9:00 am

Yeah....sometimes.



Edna3362
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23 Aug 2019, 10:19 am

Abstract thinking 'peers'? Uhm, no.
More like, my 'peers' have an instinct and a self-regulating filter that I don't have.


I'm an abstract thinker myself and I do not think I'm better than concrete thinkers.


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starcats
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23 Aug 2019, 6:19 pm

Do you mean you think concretely or learn concretely? I need concrete to learn because inside my head is so wild and crazy abstract. I usually see my abstract learner peers as having a lot of holes that they just pretend to fill in. I am usually slower to process which comes across to them as "not as smart," but I know what I know, even if I can't communicate it at rapid fire speed.



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24 Aug 2019, 11:33 am

I've notice that it takes me longer than most people to learn new skills, but when I learn them, I tend to hold on to them forever.


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Goob234
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24 Aug 2019, 12:49 pm

starcats wrote:
Do you mean you think concretely or learn concretely? I need concrete to learn because inside my head is so wild and crazy abstract. I usually see my abstract learner peers as having a lot of holes that they just pretend to fill in. I am usually slower to process which comes across to them as "not as smart," but I know what I know, even if I can't communicate it at rapid fire speed.

I understand abstract thinkers and get what they are saying but it takes me longer to think abstractly myself. I mainly think concretely. I guess, like you, it just takes me longer to process abstract thought.


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Freedom
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24 Aug 2019, 1:37 pm

What would be an example for concrete and abstract thinking?



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24 Aug 2019, 2:24 pm

Concrete? Abstract?

I'm going to have to "Think" about this.


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Goob234
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24 Aug 2019, 3:11 pm

Freedom wrote:
What would be an example for concrete and abstract thinking?

More of a definition than example but.....

Concrete thinking involves facts and descriptions about everyday, tangible objects. Thinking more literally.

Abstract thinkers are interested in the deeper meaning of things and the bigger picture. The ability to think about things that are not actually present.


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neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 148 of 200
neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 72 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)
AQ test- 37


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Location: Near the trees and fields on a hill near the sea not far from beaches, harbours and castles on the Welsh coastline in the British Isles in the U.K. You know, that place next to Europe?.

24 Aug 2019, 3:31 pm

I think I do both. I am a deep daydreamer!


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starcats
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24 Aug 2019, 9:42 pm

Freedom wrote:
What would be an example for concrete and abstract thinking?


In order to think, I have to be able to visualize what is being said inside my head. If you say "tree," I think tree--leaves--bamboo--panda bears---grizzly bears--grizzly bears in a stream catching fish--I'm hungry and would like some salmon to eat... If you want me to understand, I need "the weeping willow tree by the lake" which is much more concrete because otherwise my thinking will go off into visual abstraction.

If you say, "parts of speech are the categories to which a word is assigned in accordance to its syntactic function," I would have no idea what you said because the only things in there that make a picture in my head are "categories" and "word." That is too abstract for me to understand.

I don't know what concrete thinking would be. People who think verbally and can string thoughts together word to word?



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25 Aug 2019, 6:28 am

I'm more concrete. Abstract thinking is harder and doesn't come natural. I had troubles in school because of it.


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goatfish57
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25 Aug 2019, 6:40 am

Does problem solving require more abstract thinking? I am pretty good at applying knowledge to solve problems.


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Freedom
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25 Aug 2019, 6:45 am

I can't post a reply (technically). Don't know why.



Freedom
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25 Aug 2019, 6:52 am

Oh, I can!

Thank you Gobb and starcats!
This helps clarifying.
I can relate to the "visual dynamis" a lot. I think I am abstract thinker but it feels concrete because I use simple words from daily life to "get through". But "abstract" in my case has to be able to be "felt".

To answer the question: I feel rather frustrated, because I focus on solution with my concrete thinking and they just pretend to be interested in solution.
Well for me, solution=love,peace,truth,justice,transparency.
To them, solution means maybe to be the one who presents a solution.