Page 1 of 2 [ 17 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

Joe90
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 16,887
Location: Maidstone, UK

14 Oct 2019, 11:00 am

In case you don't know what the Mandela effect is:-
(The Mandela effect is a false memory, a psychological phenomenon where a person recalls something that did not happen or that something happened differently from the way it actually happened).

Forgive me if Mandela effect is the wrong term for what I experience but I seem to experience this a lot on WP. I've been a member of WP for a long time now and sometimes I go back and read some really old posts and replies to my posts from years back. But 9 times out of 10, a certain sentence I can remember in some of the replies are worded exactly differently when I re-read them to what I remember them as, and it's not a case of the poster going back and editing the post to change the wording of the particular sentence that stood out the most to me.

For example, say if I remember a sentence in a reply to one of my posts as "...finding a job related to your special interest is worthwhile", when I re-read the same post months or years later I gaurentee it will be worded completely differently, like ..."it will be worthwhile to find a job relating to what your special interest is", and I'm like, "I'm sure I didn't read it in those words last time?"

It's really weird. Has anyone else had this, or is it just me?


_________________
Female
Aged 29
On antidepressants
Diagnosed with AS, ADHD and anxiety disorder


naturalplastic
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Aug 2010
Age: 64
Gender: Male
Posts: 21,753
Location: temperate zone

14 Oct 2019, 7:19 pm

Obviously ...youre loosing your marbles.

Just kidding.

That example is rather trivial. The person responding to you wrote a klutzy sentence (I believe that its a split infitive, but I could be wrong), and in a passive wimpy voice. Like saying "that is something up with I will not put".

You read it and thought "got it... it's sumpin he will not put up with!". Then after a couple months you remember the gist of what he said as being the actual way he said it. Which is a better and more direct and powerful way saying the same darn thing anyway. So that's not surprising. Of course you would streamline the words in your memory.

A true "Mandella Effect" thing would be quoting the Bible as saying "the lion shall lie down with the lamb". And then actually cracking a Bible and finding that the phrase is actually "the wolf will lie down with the lamb....".

The two phrase actually convey pretty much the same idea, but the imagery is quite different. The dangerous carnivore will abstain from devouring its customary prey and just hang out. But though both are big predators a wolf and lion are two very different animals. So the fact that everyone THINKS its a lion, and its really a wolf, is much weirder than your example.

Its the Cern Collider. Its messing up the whole time space continuum!



Edna3362
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 29 Oct 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 4,735
Location: South East Asia

14 Oct 2019, 8:46 pm

In my case... Too many times; that includes my own writings and sayings. Many times more in ways I'm not aware of.

I just don't question it nor just let it be. In some cases, relied on it to some extent which is as silly as it sounds.


Or blame my myopic point of views so I stay near and see smaller and clear details and just that!
Or did step out and see a big and blurry picture cause I got myopic mind's eye, therefore to see a clear view I step into the sea of details!
So I find asking myself where the heck were my glasses at!? :mrgreen:

Only to find out I don't need glasses, then suddenly I got a metamorphic blindness or stiff bones from glancing another or stepping back from the picture, which is annoying.
And when I can metamorphically move away and glance around, AND able to see afar without any glasses... It's majestic, or scary. Whatever.



Or not! Cause I blame my crappy short term memory and my far crappier verbal abilities from who knows where.
And getting mixed up with stimulants and everyday stress. Who knows?


Oh, and it just so happened that I don't have the scientific terms for any of these. :lol: Blame my writing and language flaws. Or not.
Whatever, this post is confusing.


_________________
Gained Number Post Count (1).
Lose Time (n).


aquafelix
Toucan
Toucan

User avatar

Joined: 26 Jul 2019
Age: 48
Gender: Male
Posts: 296
Location: Australia

15 Oct 2019, 4:00 am

I think human memory is more unreliable than say the way a computers memory is.



Trogluddite
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2016
Age: 48
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,024
Location: Yorkshire, UK

15 Oct 2019, 4:37 am

^ Yes, exactly that. It's also perfectly normal for our memory to fool us into thinking that it's more reliable and accurate than it really is - something that's been well studied by psychologists. It probably even helps us to stay mentally healthy that it works that way, just as being able to forget can be as important as being able to remember - it helps us to have a stable sense of identity not to be made aware of every little contradiction to our current way of thinking that we could otherwise dredge up from our past.

So nothing to worry about - just a little sign of a human mind working exactly as it should.


_________________
When you are fighting an invisible monster, first throw a bucket of paint over it.


Joe90
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 16,887
Location: Maidstone, UK

15 Oct 2019, 11:58 am

Trogluddite wrote:
^ Yes, exactly that. It's also perfectly normal for our memory to fool us into thinking that it's more reliable and accurate than it really is - something that's been well studied by psychologists. It probably even helps us to stay mentally healthy that it works that way, just as being able to forget can be as important as being able to remember - it helps us to have a stable sense of identity not to be made aware of every little contradiction to our current way of thinking that we could otherwise dredge up from our past.

So nothing to worry about - just a little sign of a human mind working exactly as it should.


That's all right then, I thought I was getting dementia. :lol:

I had this movie on video I used to watch a lot as a child and in it one of the characters said to another character, "you don't want to get into trouble on your first day" and that sentence got stuck in my head because I loved the way he said it with a worried expression on his face. But a few years ago I found the same videotape and watched the movie after not seeing it for many years, and when that same scene came on he said a completely different sentence, "you don't want to cop it on your first day, do you?" I was like what the hell? I was SURE he said it differently when I was a child!

Mandela effect!!


_________________
Female
Aged 29
On antidepressants
Diagnosed with AS, ADHD and anxiety disorder


kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 64,075
Location: Queens, NYC

15 Oct 2019, 12:04 pm

It probably means you "grew up." You worded your thoughts better because you gained knowledge.

I doubt very much that any moderator would alter a person's post---unless there were many complaints about it. The moderators don't have time to do that to many posts.

I feel like you've just acquired more knowledge, and learned how to word things better.



Joe90
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 16,887
Location: Maidstone, UK

15 Oct 2019, 12:11 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
It probably means you "grew up." You worded your thoughts better because you gained knowledge.

I doubt very much that any moderator would alter a person's post---unless there were many complaints about it. The moderators don't have time to do that to many posts.

I feel like you've just acquired more knowledge, and learned how to word things better.


I never said anybody edited people's posts.


_________________
Female
Aged 29
On antidepressants
Diagnosed with AS, ADHD and anxiety disorder


kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 64,075
Location: Queens, NYC

15 Oct 2019, 12:16 pm

Oh. All right. Sorry about that.

My point, really, is that you have gotten better with time---much more than the potential that anybody altered your posts.

I just wanted to "cover all bases," so to speak.



naturalplastic
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Aug 2010
Age: 64
Gender: Male
Posts: 21,753
Location: temperate zone

15 Oct 2019, 1:34 pm

Joe90 wrote:
Trogluddite wrote:
^ Yes, exactly that. It's also perfectly normal for our memory to fool us into thinking that it's more reliable and accurate than it really is - something that's been well studied by psychologists. It probably even helps us to stay mentally healthy that it works that way, just as being able to forget can be as important as being able to remember - it helps us to have a stable sense of identity not to be made aware of every little contradiction to our current way of thinking that we could otherwise dredge up from our past.

So nothing to worry about - just a little sign of a human mind working exactly as it should.


That's all right then, I thought I was getting dementia. :lol:

I had this movie on video I used to watch a lot as a child and in it one of the characters said to another character, "you don't want to get into trouble on your first day" and that sentence got stuck in my head because I loved the way he said it with a worried expression on his face. But a few years ago I found the same videotape and watched the movie after not seeing it for many years, and when that same scene came on he said a completely different sentence, "you don't want to cop it on your first day, do you?" I was like what the hell? I was SURE he said it differently when I was a child!

Mandela effect!!


I don't even know WTF "you don't want to cop it on your first day" means.

Though if I saw the movie, and knew the context, I would prolly understand it.

"Cop" has been a slang noun to mean "police officer" for like a century. And more recently "cop" became a slang verb meaning "to get' or "to obtain" something (usually something illegal like guns, or drugs as in "do ya know where I can cop some weed?"). You also hear "cop a plea" (in court).



So your childhood self probably wouldn't have understood it either. And you would have filled in the gap in your knowledge with something you understood (whether it was the right meaning or not). So it makes sense that you would swap "cop it" with "get in trouble" in your mind.

Also Hollywood DOES make different versions of the same movie. Sometimes you see the same movie on TV that you saw in a theater, and on TV a memorable scene will have more family friendly dialogue than you remember. A buddy introduced me to a favorite comedy western on TV that he saw in a theater. The hero and old prospector find gold, and the old prospector explains that "I am gonna go into town and get drunk, and then I'm gonna ….get drunk again....!". My buddy explained that in the theater the guy said "I am gonna go into town, and get drunk, and then I;m gonna get laid, …".

It might be that your video was a more adult version of the same movie.



Trogluddite
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2016
Age: 48
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,024
Location: Yorkshire, UK

15 Oct 2019, 2:19 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
I don't even know WTF "you don't want to cop it on your first day" means. [...] "Cop" has been a slang noun to mean "police officer" for like a century. And more recently "cop" became a slang verb meaning "to get'

You forgot that you don't talk proper English like we do over here! :wink:

"Cop it" or "cop for it" is British slang for getting caught and punished for something; most folks of my generation over here would certainly have known it from the school playground; it may have even been a bit old-hat by then. And you have your derivation back-to-front; all ultimately derive from the verb "to cop" (catch, arrest, seize, grab, etc.) which goes back to Middle English - a "copper" was thus the person doing the copping (still pretty common for a policeman when I was a lad), and then, since "cop" seems to have over half a dozen other different meanings already, "copper" was shortened so it could have another one!

I have it on good authority that that there have even been moving picture entertainments made in such glorious dialects, too! :wink:


_________________
When you are fighting an invisible monster, first throw a bucket of paint over it.


Borromeo
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 1 Jun 2019
Age: 21
Gender: Male
Posts: 541

15 Oct 2019, 2:25 pm

Thank you Trogluddite! English slang is fascinating.

A half-way example of the "Mandela effect" is the "Heigh-Ho" song from Disney's Snow White. People think it was "off to work we go," but it was recorded as "home from work we go" at the end of the dwarves' day in the mine--and so it appeared on the Columbia soundtrack album in 1937. But "off to work" has lingered stronger in pop culture than "home from."

I like the Simpson's parody of it!



Trogluddite
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2016
Age: 48
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,024
Location: Yorkshire, UK

15 Oct 2019, 2:35 pm

^ Seriously, don't get me started! I've wasted years of my life having giggle fits over eggcorns, mondegreens, and crash blossoms. I also had relatives and step-relatives from five different UK regions, and have spent most of my adult life in another, so it's not unusual that I even confuse British people with the strange old idioms that I've collected over the years. For a collection hobby, it is remarkably inexpensive!

"Beam me up, Scotty" is another famous one - it was apparently never said in that exact form in any of the three original Star Trek series, but that's how almost everyone remembers it and parodies it.


_________________
When you are fighting an invisible monster, first throw a bucket of paint over it.


naturalplastic
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Aug 2010
Age: 64
Gender: Male
Posts: 21,753
Location: temperate zone

15 Oct 2019, 4:16 pm

Trogluddite wrote:
^ Seriously, don't get me started! I've wasted years of my life having giggle fits over eggcorns, mondegreens, and crash blossoms. I also had relatives and step-relatives from five different UK regions, and have spent most of my adult life in another, so it's not unusual that I even confuse British people with the strange old idioms that I've collected over the years. For a collection hobby, it is remarkably inexpensive!

"Beam me up, Scotty" is another famous one - it was apparently never said in that exact form in any of the three original Star Trek series, but that's how almost everyone remembers it and parodies it.

Yes...supposedly Sherlock Holmes never actually uttered the phrase "elementary my dear Watson" in any of the dozens of short stories or novels by Arthur Conan Doyle. And supposedly Jimmy Cagney never said "youuuu rat. You dirty rat" in any movie.



naturalplastic
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Aug 2010
Age: 64
Gender: Male
Posts: 21,753
Location: temperate zone

15 Oct 2019, 4:57 pm

Trogluddite wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
I don't even know WTF "you don't want to cop it on your first day" means. [...] "Cop" has been a slang noun to mean "police officer" for like a century. And more recently "cop" became a slang verb meaning "to get'

You forgot that you don't talk proper English like we do over here! :wink:

:

I think that you meant "you don't SPEAK proper English like we do over here!". :lol:
That aside...

Well..you learn sumpin every day.


If that is so then that contradicts every theory posited by every American pundit I have ever heard for the origin of both of the two "Cop" slang terms.

I had the impression that cop the noun (police) and cop the verb (to obtain) were unrelated. That's because the police "cop" (short for "copper") supposedly comes from the copper badges worn by the first police department in America (that of New York City). I have heard even dumber theories like that it comes from an acronym like "constable on patrol".

We read an essay in college by a Claude Brown (famous African American author) about Black slang. He said cop-the-verb came from "copulation", and then later got applied to "getting" other things like drugs.

So I had the impression that both cops were American, and that the police cop was 19th Century at most, and the other was 20th century and originated in the Black ghetto.

But youre saying that cop (to grab, and by extension to grab a miscreant person) was British school yard slang like fifty years ago, and has deep roots in older English. If so that would explain both the noun and the verb "cops" (they aren't unrelated after all).

Your theory that both cops go deep back into England English makes sense.

The only problem is...if youre a juvenile delinquent who...cops a feel from a girl, and then goes out and cops some weed, and then gets COPPED by the cops, and forces his parents to cop a plea for you in court... all of those usages of cop except the one that's capitalized are strictly American. To BE copped is solely British. You can cop weed, but the authorities don't cop YOU in America.

I think that youre right that the Brit and the American cop terms are related. But it is funny how we don't use cop the one way that you Brits do use the term.

Interesting.