Page 1 of 3 [ 37 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

QFT
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 27 Jun 2019
Age: 40
Gender: Male
Posts: 651

16 Oct 2019, 9:46 pm

Apart from the obvious fact that any given song has the same words every time, they also have an added predictability: before they ever say the first word, they have that tune that make you *know* what song are they about to sing. Now, autistics like predictability. So could it be that the music is sort of designed for them? I mean I heard people saying that autistics are good in music and that kind of stuff. But I don't think anyone ever pointed out that thing with the tune helping you predict the song. People think the predictor-tune thing is sort of a given, but to me it strikes me as autistic.



franceman
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

Joined: 13 Oct 2019
Posts: 8
Location: Cleveland, OH

16 Oct 2019, 9:50 pm

well... :|



naturalplastic
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Aug 2010
Age: 64
Gender: Male
Posts: 21,914
Location: temperate zone

16 Oct 2019, 9:58 pm

Oh absolutely!

All of the great composers of history (98 percent of whom were NT) were writing solely for the benefit of the one or two percent of the population who are autistic. Mozart, Bach, Beethoven, Stravinsky, Gilbert and Sullivan, Louis Armstrong, Gershwin, Lennon and McCartney, Elton John, Kanye West, all of them....were going against their NT nature just to please autistic listeners. Doing so by putting a little repetition in their music.

Total sarcasm.

If youre suggesting that music is literally "designed for autistics" then that is obviously nonsense.

For some reason humans need repeated rythmns, and repeated melody lines, when listening to music. If anything its a very NT thing. Its part of social interaction. A crowd will respond to the music by moving as group (even if they don't actually dance together), and that's aided and abetted by certain amounts of repetition. Like the repeated phrases that a drill sergeant barks at a unit to keep it marching in unision. Very extravert. Very group oriented. Very NT. Which doesn't mean that autistics cant excel at music. And music may well be a good a bridge between autistics and nts and help autistics to interact with nts.



QFT
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 27 Jun 2019
Age: 40
Gender: Male
Posts: 651

16 Oct 2019, 10:02 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
All of the great composers of history (98 percent of whom were NT) were writing solely for the benefit of the one or two percent of the population who are autistic. Mozart, Bach, Beethoven, Stravinsky, Gilbert and Sullivan, Louis Armstrong, Gershwin, Lennon and McCartney, Elton John, Kanye West, all of them....


I heard the speculation that Mozart was autistic. He only learned to speak at the age of 4. Also, when he would play the music as a little kid, and was interrupted, after the interruption was over he would get back to the exact place he left off to finish it.



Edna3362
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 29 Oct 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 4,768
Location: South East Asia

16 Oct 2019, 11:42 pm

I admit, it's laughable...


It is rather cheesy, but music is designed for anything, really.
The soul, through the body and brain, through the listener's perspectives...

It mattered a nil what the neurology is, what the context is, or what the heck is made of. Not even specifically for humans.
Not even for those with hearing.
Let alone something less encompassing as 'scales' of autistic and allistic -- no pun intended.


The 'music' that most human knows are mostly musics for humans to listen, along with what humans considers music from some noise or sounds.

Therefore most evidences are based on known data... :lol: And the question if music is for autistics...

Just like a certain cultures mostly knows it's own culture's music or musics that they only allow themselves to listen if it happens that there are other musics to be filtered/censored/averting/unequipped from.
Neither human known music for is autistic nor allistic. It goes beyond that.


_________________
Gained Number Post Count (1).
Lose Time (n).


CockneyRebel
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Jul 2004
Age: 45
Gender: Male
Posts: 103,416
Location: Hanging out with my fellow Sweet Peas at Stalag 13

17 Oct 2019, 12:24 am

I think that music is designed for anyone who likes it. I love to listen to music. Another person on the spectrum might not like music at all.


_________________
Schultz

viewtopic.php?f=11&t=26&start=645


Joe90
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 17,019
Location: Maidstone, UK

17 Oct 2019, 1:04 am

Most, if not all, humans like music. That's why there are radios, music channels, top charts, CDs, albums, iPods, Spotify, records, the list goes on. NTs love it. In fact the latest hits are what NTs like to talk about, and also music helps bring memories from when you grew up or different times of our lives. A lot of NTs have a talent for a musical instrument too.

And in the era where the earliest music was first introduced I don't think autism was even known of then.


_________________
Female
Aged 29
On antidepressants
Diagnosed with AS, ADHD and anxiety disorder


naturalplastic
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Aug 2010
Age: 64
Gender: Male
Posts: 21,914
Location: temperate zone

17 Oct 2019, 4:03 am

QFT wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
All of the great composers of history (98 percent of whom were NT) were writing solely for the benefit of the one or two percent of the population who are autistic. Mozart, Bach, Beethoven, Stravinsky, Gilbert and Sullivan, Louis Armstrong, Gershwin, Lennon and McCartney, Elton John, Kanye West, all of them....


I heard the speculation that Mozart was autistic. He only learned to speak at the age of 4. Also, when he would play the music as a little kid, and was interrupted, after the interruption was over he would get back to the exact place he left off to finish it.


So...?

Some composers may well have been autistic, or aspie, (I strongly suspect that both Charlie Parker, and Thelonius Monk were aspie. Mozart was probably wired differently than typical as well) but their audience was not autistic. If your theory were right then the best selling songs on the radio would be examples of avant garde atonal music that never repeats itself (because according to your theory that's what the NT majority would go for- stuff that doesn't repeat). But instead of hearing compositions by Schoenberg you hear Britney Spears and Justin Bieber doing repetitive dance music. :lol:

I agree that music is a field that individual autistics can build upon their autistic traits to excel in. Like some autistics can excel in stereotypically nerdy fields like math and computer science. But I don't see how music could have evolved in the human species just for the benefit OF autistic people. That notion just doesn't make any sense.



Fireblossom
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 18 Jan 2017
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,824

17 Oct 2019, 5:22 am

QFT wrote:
Apart from the obvious fact that any given song has the same words every time, they also have an added predictability: before they ever say the first word, they have that tune that make you *know* what song are they about to sing. Now, autistics like predictability. So could it be that the music is sort of designed for them? I mean I heard people saying that autistics are good in music and that kind of stuff. But I don't think anyone ever pointed out that thing with the tune helping you predict the song. People think the predictor-tune thing is sort of a given, but to me it strikes me as autistic.


Eer... if the words and the tune weren't the same every time, it would be different music. With this logic movies, books and TV shows are all made for autistic people too since they don't change either.



QFT
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 27 Jun 2019
Age: 40
Gender: Male
Posts: 651

17 Oct 2019, 8:49 am

Fireblossom wrote:
QFT wrote:
Apart from the obvious fact that any given song has the same words every time, they also have an added predictability: before they ever say the first word, they have that tune that make you *know* what song are they about to sing. Now, autistics like predictability. So could it be that the music is sort of designed for them? I mean I heard people saying that autistics are good in music and that kind of stuff. But I don't think anyone ever pointed out that thing with the tune helping you predict the song. People think the predictor-tune thing is sort of a given, but to me it strikes me as autistic.


Eer... if the words and the tune weren't the same every time, it would be different music. With this logic movies, books and TV shows are all made for autistic people too since they don't change either.


But with books you have sometimes the same book in different cover. Yet with music there is always that tune before the song starts in order to help you predict what song would it be. I am not even talking about the tune during the song but right before it. Like whats the point of having that tune before the song to tell you what song you are about to listen to? Why not just start that song right away?



kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 64,701
Location: Queens, NYC

17 Oct 2019, 8:53 am

Because that's the nature of songs. It comes naturally to composers.



QFT
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 27 Jun 2019
Age: 40
Gender: Male
Posts: 651

17 Oct 2019, 8:55 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
Because that's the nature of songs. It comes naturally to composers.


I remember one of my ex-s told me that its actually a rule to have that tone before the song. She even told me that if the tunes before two separate songs coincide with each other then the second composer (who presumably copied it from the first one) gets sued.



Fnord
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 40,840
Location: Stendec

17 Oct 2019, 8:57 am

QFT wrote:
Apart from the obvious fact that any given song has the same words every time...
You must be listening to "Christian Rock". That genre has little variation in theme, lyrics, key or tempo, and most of it seems to be performed by the same collection of under-30 white people.
QFT wrote:
... they also have an added predictability: before they ever say the first word, they have that tune that make you *know* what song are they about to sing.
That's called the "Intro", and it's common in all genres of music.
QFT wrote:
Now, autistics like predictability. So could it be that the music is sort of designed for them? I mean I heard people saying that autistics are good in music and that kind of stuff. But I don't think anyone ever pointed out that thing with the tune helping you predict the song. People think the predictor-tune thing is sort of a given, but to me it strikes me as autistic.
Well, that's your opinion. The fact is that "intros" have been used for hundreds of years, especially in Renaissance-era hymns -- it gave the largely illiterate congregations an idea of how the hymn should be sung.


_________________
 
“I must acknowledge, once and for all, that the
purpose of diplomacy is to prolong a crisis.”

— Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock, in the Star Trek
episode "The Mark of Gideon" (ep. 3.16, 1969)


Fireblossom
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 18 Jan 2017
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,824

18 Oct 2019, 8:32 am

QFT wrote:
Fireblossom wrote:
QFT wrote:
Apart from the obvious fact that any given song has the same words every time, they also have an added predictability: before they ever say the first word, they have that tune that make you *know* what song are they about to sing. Now, autistics like predictability. So could it be that the music is sort of designed for them? I mean I heard people saying that autistics are good in music and that kind of stuff. But I don't think anyone ever pointed out that thing with the tune helping you predict the song. People think the predictor-tune thing is sort of a given, but to me it strikes me as autistic.


Eer... if the words and the tune weren't the same every time, it would be different music. With this logic movies, books and TV shows are all made for autistic people too since they don't change either.


But with books you have sometimes the same book in different cover. Yet with music there is always that tune before the song starts in order to help you predict what song would it be. I am not even talking about the tune during the song but right before it. Like whats the point of having that tune before the song to tell you what song you are about to listen to? Why not just start that song right away?


Music can have different covers too when talking about CDs. The cover of the CD isn't a permanent part of the music, but neither is a cover of a book part of the story.



gwynfryn
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Aug 2004
Gender: Male
Posts: 502
Location: France

18 Oct 2019, 10:45 am

If the film Amadeus was based on biographical details, then Mozart was most certainly autistic, in terms of personality. It’s the best such portrayal I’ve ever seen, and far more “me” than those odd acting detectives, or whatever. Clues are his irreverence of the nobility, the way he corrected the “too many notes” comment. It would also explain why he had such a hard time making a living from his music; the Establishment (who back then were the only people who could afford music lessons, private recitals and the like) don’t like autistics!