Should I quit my job in this case?

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ironpony
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30 Oct 2019, 12:03 am

My job is freezing cold in the winter, and I was thinking of quitting. But I feel bad cause this is the fourth job I would be quitting, cause of it being freezing cold to work. All my jobs have been working outside, a lot, and that sucks for winter where I live, where it gets very cold.

Accept for one job that was indoors, I had, but all the rest have been out. I just feel bad for quitting for the fourth outdoor winter job. But I find it very hard to stand the whether and it's so hard not to quit therefore while I look for another job. What do you think?



AnneOleson
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30 Oct 2019, 1:22 am

I’d look for the other job before you quit this one. You’re in the Prairies aren’t you? When my mother immigrated to Canada she was first in Winnipeg for a few years. Thankfully she moved to Southern Ontario. Still cold in winter, but not like the Prairies.



ironpony
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30 Oct 2019, 7:48 am

Yeah in the prairies. It's just tough looking for another job, cause I never have time to go for interviews, since they always want to do it during the hours of my current job, and I can't take that many sick days to do interviews before they become suspicious though. How do you get around that, when looking for another job, while you have one?



Guy Incognito
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31 Oct 2019, 10:45 pm

ironpony wrote:
Yeah in the prairies. It's just tough looking for another job, cause I never have time to go for interviews, since they always want to do it during the hours of my current job, and I can't take that many sick days to do interviews before they become suspicious though. How do you get around that, when looking for another job, while you have one?


Lunch break? Suggest a Skype interview?



Dimples123
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01 Nov 2019, 2:33 pm

Is there any warmer clothes you could wear that is comfortable for you for on the job?



ironpony
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02 Nov 2019, 4:50 am

Oh yeah I wear warm clothes, but it seems like after 30 minutes of really cold winter weather, the warmer clothes still do not do as well after that much time has gone by. I think warmer clothes were meant to be worn for short periods of time, rather than all day in brutally cold weather.



Dimples123
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02 Nov 2019, 3:58 pm

ironpony wrote:
Oh yeah I wear warm clothes, but it seems like after 30 minutes of really cold winter weather, the warmer clothes still do not do as well after that much time has gone by. I think warmer clothes were meant to be worn for short periods of time, rather than all day in brutally cold weather.


Are you able to take a drink you like warm with you like having a thermos? Maybe it could help?



ironpony
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03 Nov 2019, 2:23 pm

Well some of the workers have tried that, but the supervisor said that it's causing workers to get distracted easily and no more drinks while working are allowed anymore as a result.



ironpony
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03 Nov 2019, 2:24 pm

Guy Incognito wrote:
ironpony wrote:
Yeah in the prairies. It's just tough looking for another job, cause I never have time to go for interviews, since they always want to do it during the hours of my current job, and I can't take that many sick days to do interviews before they become suspicious though. How do you get around that, when looking for another job, while you have one?


Lunch break? Suggest a Skype interview?


Employers don't do skype interviews, or at least I've never heard of that. They always ask to people to come in.



superboyian
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18 Nov 2019, 8:00 pm

Only do so if you have another job lined up and 100% guaranteed. Then quit.
If you quit, it will be a whole lot harder to find employment, especially in your case.


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jimmy m
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18 Nov 2019, 9:46 pm

Generally it is always best to find another job while you still are working.

I would recommend dressing for cold weather.

When the weather is colder I wear chemical hand warmers inside my gloves.

Generally, I recommend you dress in layers. Normally I use thermal underwear (top and bottom) as the innermost layer.

There are four basic principles to follow to keep warm.
• Keep clothing clean. This principle is always important for sanitation and comfort. But in winter, it is also important from the standpoint of warmth. Clothes matted with dirt and grease lose much of their insulation value. Heat can escape more easily from the body through the clothing's crushed or filled up air pockets.
• Avoid overheating. When you get too hot, you sweat and your clothing absorbs the moisture. This affects your warmth in two ways: dampness decreases the insulation quality of clothing, and as sweat evaporates, your body cools. Adjust your clothing so that you do not sweat. Do this by partially opening your parka or jacket, by removing an inner layer of clothing, by removing heavy outer mittens, or by throwing back your parka hood or changing to lighter headgear. The head and hands act as efficient heat dissipaters when overheated.
• Wear your clothing loose and in layers. Wearing tight clothing and footgear restricts blood circulation and invites cold injury. It also decreases the volume of air trapped between the layers, reducing its insulating value. Several layers of lightweight clothing are better than one equally thick layer of clothing, because the layers have dead airspace between them. The dead airspace provides extra insulation. Also, layers of clothing allow you to take off or add clothing layers to prevent excessive sweating or to increase warmth.
• Keep clothing dry. Water conducts heat away from the body 22 times faster than does air. In cold temperatures, your inner layers of clothing can become wet from sweat and your outer layer, if not water repellent, can become wet from snow and frost melted by body heat. Wear water repellent outer clothing, if available. It will shed most of the water collected from melting snow and frost.

Lately I have begun to wear one piece insulated overalls. For example
Carhartt Men's Quilt Lined Zip To Waist Bib Overalls It keeps my body warm.

As far as your feet, I might suggest going down to an Army surplus store and picking up a pair of Mickey Mouse White Type II Extreme Cold Weather Boots. Military “Mickey Mouse” boots will keep your feet warm in extreme cold weather. They can be purchased used, reasonably priced at an Army Surplus store. Black Type I Extreme Cold Weather “Bunny” Boots are designed to be worn in wet or dry conditions down to -20°F (-29°C). White Type II Extreme Cold Weather Boots are suitable cold dry weather in snow or ice conditions down to -60°F (-51°C). These boots were first used by the military during the Korean War. Their most distinguishable features are their giant size. Reminded of the iconic cartoon character, soldiers joked they were in Mickey Mouse's shoes. The black boots are 100% rubber, with thick wool insulation all around, plus an insulating air pocket all sandwiched between the layers of rubber. The white boots are constructed with insulation consisting of three layers of needle punched polyester foam hermetically sealed within an outer and inner layer of rubber.

You must not only have enough clothing to protect you from the cold, you must also know how to maximize the warmth you get from it. For example, always keep your head covered. You can lose 40 to 45 percent of body heat from an unprotected head and even more from the unprotected neck, wrist, and ankles. These areas of the body are good radiators of heat and have very little insulating fat. The brain is very susceptible to cold and can stand the least amount of cooling. Because there is much blood circulation in the head, most of which is on the surface, you can lose heat quickly if you do not cover your head.