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Loborojo
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11 May 2020, 6:07 am

To who?


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kraftiekortie
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11 May 2020, 6:41 am

To your sister, of course :)



skibum
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11 May 2020, 10:13 am

dragonsanddemons wrote:
I can’t recall ever being called childish, but I do certainly feel childlike. In some ways, I am still like a child, but in others I seem to be far more mature than most NTs can ever hope to be over the course of their lifetimes. I place my typical emotional age around 10.
I am just like you in that regard except that my emotional cap is 4-6


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skibum
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11 May 2020, 10:14 am

Loborojo wrote:
Thanks, yes, you opened up a can of worms here...
Oh no, cans of worms are not usually a good thing. They are usually only good if you are a fisherman. I hope it is not causing you problems.


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ToughDiamond
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11 May 2020, 11:40 am

Strangely enough I'm the opposite, with an almost unshakeably calm exterior. I get annoyed when others turn things into drama. I gather it's part of the British stereotype. Also my parents were very intolerant of anything approaching a tantrum, so I was probably trained not to throw a wobbly. I do feel anger, frustration, anxiety etc. and I'm not bad at expressing it as long a I feel the people around me will take it in the right way - so I'll raise my voice a little and use stronger vocabulary, and will speak with some passion, but when I do, I'm often wary of others feeling overwhelmed by it, which is ironic, because most of the drama-queen behaviour comes from others. Sometimes I think that by being very calm most of the time I've given them a low baseline to judge me by, so that if I do fly off the handle a bit, they find it more of a shock. And I'm probably in the habit of feeling that any outbursts from me are judged harshly, because of my upbringing.



Loborojo
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12 May 2020, 4:01 am

skibum wrote:
Loborojo wrote:
Thanks, yes, you opened up a can of worms here...
Oh no, cans of worms are not usually a good thing. They are usually only good if you are a fisherman. I hope it is not causing you problems.
nO, the only problems is that, I get sucked in deeper into this them of trying to understand what triggers of a childish reaction.


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Loborojo
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12 May 2020, 4:06 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
To your sister, of course :)


Impossible, we live miles apart, and I have fallen out again with her, on Facebook, exactly over me trying to tell her to saty away from cigarettes and alcohol because it makes her more vulnerable to infection of Corona. And that tip I gave her, she regards this as a criticism of mine on her lifestyle. Leave me alone, she said. I have surmised that even my siblings are somehow on the spectrum..my surely was. ANd my eldest sister's son is autistic, a sweet boy, now a sweet man, who always smiles and rarely says a word. So, not on the high spectrum. But when I came out to them with Asperger and that our mum surely had, sparked outrage from my siblings...How dare I even suggest this...I am not a doctor..yes, they see autism still in this stereotype of Rainman...they do not read up on it. I am quite verbose, so they say, you cannot be autistic...the usual cliches.


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kraftiekortie
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12 May 2020, 4:10 am

If somebody is otherwise functioning well and, say, is not always arguing with people, having “childish” interests would not make the person “childish.”

I feel like your family feels like you are questioning their morals. Doesn’t mean it’s right. They are certainly not knowledgeable about Aspergers or mild autism.



Joe90
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12 May 2020, 4:17 am

I hate it when people are called childish when they're not being childish at all. Like one time I was in a store and a customer was throwing a wobbly because the shop assistant was serving other customers and politely told her to wait her turn. But the customer was yelling that she was in a hurry and needed to be served now, but the shop assistant told her again that she'll have to wait. The customer didn't like that and called the shop assistant "childish" and told him to "grow up", then stormed away. How is the shop assistant being childish when he was just doing his job and staying calm? If anything the customer was the one acting like a 4-year-old because she couldn't wait in line and was yelling and making a scene all because she couldn't be served first.


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kraftiekortie
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12 May 2020, 4:21 am

^the customer was acting childish. Maybe the customer could have stated the reasons for being in such a hurry.
The customer almost certainly didn’t have to catch a plane.



Joe90
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12 May 2020, 4:39 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
^the customer was acting childish. Maybe the customer could have stated the reasons for being in such a hurry.
The customer almost certainly didn’t have to catch a plane.


Well, most supermarkets have rules and if you're going to be late for something then it's your problem and that you should have planned your time in advance. If she did have valid proof as to why she needed to hurry then maybe the shop assistant might have given her priority, but whether your reason is genuine or not the shop assistant can't just let you off if you have no proof, otherwise anyone could pull that trick just to get served first.


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ToughDiamond
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13 May 2020, 10:37 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
If somebody is otherwise functioning well and, say, is not always arguing with people, having “childish” interests would not make the person “childish.”

Absolutely. I see a lot of mainstream interests as extremely childish, but I don't try to shame individuals for their hobbies, as long as they aren't doing any harm.