New study: intervention for children with autism

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Steve B
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09 Nov 2020, 2:23 am

Here is a new large narrative review study of intervention for children with autism that has come out of Australia's Autism CRC research group. There are so many interventions around for children with autism that it's hard to navigate what is quakery and hype and what is most likely to be helpful and respectful of an autistic child. Hopefully this may be useful to parents.

HERE: Community Summary - Interventions for children on the autism spectrum



Juliette
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09 Nov 2020, 4:05 am

Thanks for sharing this, Steve. Good to see. Those early days after a child is first diagnosed can be a whirlwind of grief, massive research and confusion for a parent. Been there, as an Australian parent who is on the spectrum and who has also worked in the field. I have three children on the spectrum, now adults whose outcomes have been exceptionally good. It's so important that parents are given positive support and direction as opposed to the negative doom and gloom/tea and sympathy approach that used to be on offer, and in many cases, still is. So many children have suffered and been harmed or worse from the quackery out there. eg chelation etc

There are some wonderful positive "interventions" that do work, involving the respect and acceptance of the state of being autistic first and foremost. There's quite a learning curve when it comes to interpreting behaviours and creating a calm, safe environment for a child born autistic. Parents definitely could benefit from a more postive approach from the outset. I remember the early days of the Australia Autism Forum and remain in close contact with some of its members who like myself, had children presenting with extreme behavioural challenges. Back then, around 2006, there seemed a heavy emphasis on "curing the child at all costs" and the desire to prevent and banish autism altogether. Back then, it was so good to see professionals who were on the spectrum themselves, bringing about positive change and dialogue, sharing information and strategies in regard behavioural issues etc. Back then, there was so much confusion and misinformation. Thanks again.



Steve B
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09 Nov 2020, 6:29 am

I'm glad you found it useful. I have multiple children on the spectrum myself and have been in practice as a psychologist for over 20 years. I wholeheartedly agree that it takes a while for parents (and the autistic person) to find a balance between stretching to learn skills needed to move towards adult independence and letting the person rest and just be allowed to be autistic. Unfortunately, each generation of anxious parents of newly diagnosed children have to wade through the confusion and misinformation and unscrupulous practitioners promising to "scrub" the autism out of their child. It is better than it was.



SocOfAutism
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10 Nov 2020, 8:08 am

I like this. There were lots of thoughtful interventions and considerations.

Thanks for posting it!