I thought I'd share a tool that you could use to understand

Page 1 of 1 [ 12 posts ] 

XSara
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

Joined: 12 Sep 2016
Gender: Female
Posts: 52
Location: italy

19 Nov 2020, 3:50 am

other people's emotions.

http://atlasofemotions.org

Dr Paul Ekman is a really famous psychologist; you can find out more about him here: https://www.paulekman.com/about/paul-ekman/

Do you think this tool is also helpful to understand your own emotions?



Pieplup
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Dec 2015
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,558
Location: The Void

19 Nov 2020, 4:50 am

XSara wrote:
other people's emotions.

http://atlasofemotions.org

Dr Paul Ekman is a really famous psychologist; you can find out more about him here: https://www.paulekman.com/about/paul-ekman/

Do you think this tool is also helpful to understand your own emotions?

Not really still won't be able to identify them. Or explain them or why i feel that way. For me no it might help other people as far as the atlas itself. I don't know the actions thing might help. I don't know for me it wouldn't help that much because i still have to figure out what i'm feeling. I don't really think of emotions beyond just happy sad angry. Might help me to understand more complicated emotions idk.


_________________
Ψ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Ψ youtube.com/c/pieplup
ISTJ-A - HSP - 21 - AQ - 43 - EQ - 13 - SQ - 69 - RAADS-R - 196 - Aspie Quiz (AS:176/NT:30)
Professionally Diagnosed: with A.D.H.D., Dysgraphia, PDD-NOS, and Social Phobia. Possible PTSD

Ψ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Ψ


Joe90
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 19,057
Location: Maidstone, UK

19 Nov 2020, 7:44 am

I don't have trouble understanding my own or other people's emotions.


_________________
Female
Aged 30
On antidepressants
Diagnosed with AS, ADHD and anxiety disorder
Empathy score: 61 out of a possible 80. (High)


Fnord
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 45,645
Location: Stendec

19 Nov 2020, 9:10 am

Joe90 wrote:
I don't have trouble understanding my own or other people's emotions.
Same.

I only have trouble with giving an "appropriate" response.


_________________
*TRE45ON!!*
Lock Him Up!

(Claiming moral equivalency between one's own
immoral acts and those of another is a null defense.)


XSara
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

Joined: 12 Sep 2016
Gender: Female
Posts: 52
Location: italy

20 Nov 2020, 12:27 pm

So other people's emotions follow this scheme: there is a trigger (which is for example: a friend gets angry with them). then there's the emotion felt in the body (which could be one of the 5), they interpret immediately what they are feeling and why, then immediately (or after some time) they respond to the friend who got angry with them.

How would you describe the scheme of an alexithymic person instead, folowing that example?

when you feel an emotion do you notice it immediately or after some time?

what's the thought process that leads you to figure out what emotion you feel?Do you ask youself any questions? If so, which ones?

what's the thought process that leads you to figure out why you feel that way? Do you ask youself any questions? If so, which ones?

Is the reason why you feel a certain way unconscious while you're having an emotion? Or is it conscious but in the midst of the emotional reaction and the chaos that it provokes inside you, you find it hard to find the words to describe it?

when you finally figure out how you feel, do you respond to the other person?



Fnord
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 45,645
Location: Stendec

20 Nov 2020, 1:23 pm

↑ You need to ask those questions of an appropriately-trained and licensed mental-health practitioner, and not a bunch of strangers on a social website.


_________________
*TRE45ON!!*
Lock Him Up!

(Claiming moral equivalency between one's own
immoral acts and those of another is a null defense.)


Steve1963
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 9 Jun 2020
Age: 57
Gender: Male
Posts: 750
Location: western MA, USA

20 Nov 2020, 1:24 pm

^ not everyone has access to one of those



Joe90
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 19,057
Location: Maidstone, UK

20 Nov 2020, 1:25 pm

Emotions are natural to me so it's pretty hard to explain how I feel emotions to an alexithimic person (word spelt wrong I know, I don't know how to pronounce it).

Quote:
when you feel an emotion do you notice it immediately or after some time?

Immediately for me, or as soon as I realise the seriousness of the situation.

Quote:
what's the thought process that leads you to figure out what emotion you feel?Do you ask youself any questions? If so, which ones?

I'm not sure there is a thought process. I just...feel. A bit like when you hurt yourself really bad, you immediately feel the pain without stopping to think first (generally speaking, that is).

Quote:
what's the thought process that leads you to figure out why you feel that way? Do you ask youself any questions? If so, which ones?

Depending on why the friend is angry at me, I feel guilt ("have I done/said something wrong?"), shame ("oh no, my friend is mad at me"), anxiety ("oh, God, what do I do? How do I resolve this?"), anger ("how dare they get mad at me/speak to me like that!"), sadness ("I can't believe they're mad at me" *cries*). For me the umbrella term for these emotions is "upset that my friend is angry with me". I'll feel at least one of these emotions. But, like I said before, it can depend on the scenario/reason behind why the friend is angry at me. There is no black and white when it comes to emotions, usually how you feel is based on context of the situation.

Quote:
Is the reason why you feel a certain way unconscious while you're having an emotion? Or is it conscious but in the midst of the emotional reaction and the chaos that it provokes inside you, you find it hard to find the words to describe it?

It's usually unconscious, like I'll feel a certain way without my brain cognitively thinking about it. But I think this is just coming from an overly sensitive person, as some people (especially men) might not feel bothered at all by a friend being angry at them and might just shrug it off and think "it's their problem, they'll get over it, if they don't then they weren't a friend to begin with." I find this logic very difficult to admit, because I am more about emotions than logic.

Quote:
when you finally figure out how you feel, do you respond to the other person?

The other person can usually tell how I'm feeling by my body language, which I can't always hide. Sometimes I cry, for 2 reasons; A, because I'm really upset, and B, because I want them to know how upset I really am.

Hope this helps.


_________________
Female
Aged 30
On antidepressants
Diagnosed with AS, ADHD and anxiety disorder
Empathy score: 61 out of a possible 80. (High)


Fnord
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 45,645
Location: Stendec

20 Nov 2020, 1:25 pm

Steve1963 wrote:
^ not everyone has access to one of those
They are all over the Internet; just not here.


_________________
*TRE45ON!!*
Lock Him Up!

(Claiming moral equivalency between one's own
immoral acts and those of another is a null defense.)


autisticelders
Raven
Raven

Joined: 23 Feb 2020
Gender: Female
Posts: 102
Location: Alpena MI

20 Nov 2020, 3:00 pm

not useful at all, the graphics in motion and the rapid switching of pages, etc was overwhelming. I have very poor visual processing and very poor audio processing. Plain charts and simple printed information are the way I am best able to interact with the world. I always feel disappointed when I see some new link with videos or flashy graphics that fade and appear randomly, have music, voice overs or other stuff that messes with my ability to understand. I feel as if I must be missing out on a great deal but I simply can not access that stuff and make sense of it. So frustrating. Not a tool I can use at all. Story of my life. No wonder I have always been confused. I did not learn of my sensory processing issues until neurological tests at age 68. At least now I understand why I have always struggled to understand so much that seems perfectly clear to others.



Edna3362
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 29 Oct 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,785
Location: ᜆᜄᜎᜓᜄ᜔

20 Nov 2020, 3:26 pm

I like the idea.
Yet it's too basic... At least from my point of view.

Also from where I came from, it won't work that way. :lol:
Not only due to more complex and multilayered contexts, but also sometimes the reality works backwards, multidimensionally unspoken...

On top of that, my personality and reactions -- not as straight forward, inconsistent, conflicting, or illogical.
So it also doesn't work well with me.



I say... It needs more data. Likely billions worth of that, but don't get too ahead.
Also the interfaces.
Not everyone has the adequate equipment to run the animations, nor everyone could visually follow the whole thing. :o


_________________
Gained Number Post Count (1).
Lose Time (n).


Dear_one
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2008
Age: 72
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,391
Location: Where the Great Plains meet the Northern Pines

21 Nov 2020, 7:30 am

The tool is not helping, but it also seems to be too fancy to run with my software. In the early stages of self-exploration, I had a paper list of emotions I'd read over to pick out a match. Anger was sometimes easier to identify, because it made the speedometer on my car read ten higher than usual.