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Earthbound_Alien
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11 Mar 2021, 4:27 am

Going by social attitudes there is a difference between Aspergers and Autism.

Personally I am more like Temple Grandin personality wise but have to take the label of Aspergers because I did not have delayed speech.

Aspergers has a different public image to autism...different stereotypes and all that.

It pisses me off as people expect me to be logical and serious all the time when actually I can be quite playful. If I am playful then they expect me to be stupid which is annoying.

I like playful, but I liked being smart too (lost some of my iq when i got smacked on the head by a car in a hit and run accident).

Which catagory do you feel you fall in to and should autism be split into categories at all?

My dad was autistic, he reminded me of rainman, but not so much on steroids.

I love my dad, be kind.



Joe90
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11 Mar 2021, 5:14 am

I have Asperger's, or level 1 autism, although I don't like being lumped together with autism.

I do think autism should be split into levels or whatever because some people with autism are more disabled than others. It is a spectrum after all, which usually means it can be ranged from mild to severe. Most people fall into the moderate area where their autism is mild in some areas but severe in others.
I fall into the mild end of the spectrum because despite my symptoms I'm still more or less just as capable of living independently as the average NT and I don't need any outside support.

Usually people with Asperger's are more likely to come across as quirky or eccentric, whereas people with classic autism are more obvious. Babies with Asperger's are more likely to approach their milestones at the average stages, especially speech. Usually babies with autism are more likely to be delayed in speech and other development.

But these days most people on the spectrum refuse to accept or believe that there are different severities of autism and believe autism should just be 1 thing.

The dictionary definition of "spectrum" has 2 different meanings.

Quote:
1. a band of colours, as seen in a rainbow, produced by separation of the components of light by their different degrees of refraction according to wavelength.
2. used to classify something in terms of its position on a scale between two extreme points.


Autism is not like the colour spectrum, it's more like the latter. It has extremes, but I'm not saying everyone on the spectrum either has one extreme or the other. But some of us do.


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Earthbound_Alien
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11 Mar 2021, 8:37 am

Joe90 wrote:
I have Asperger's, or level 1 autism, although I don't like being lumped together with autism.

I do think autism should be split into levels or whatever because some people with autism are more disabled than others. It is a spectrum after all, which usually means it can be ranged from mild to severe. Most people fall into the moderate area where their autism is mild in some areas but severe in others.
I fall into the mild end of the spectrum because despite my symptoms I'm still more or less just as capable of living independently as the average NT and I don't need any outside support.

Usually people with Asperger's are more likely to come across as quirky or eccentric, whereas people with classic autism are more obvious. Babies with Asperger's are more likely to approach their milestones at the average stages, especially speech. Usually babies with autism are more likely to be delayed in speech and other development.

But these days most people on the spectrum refuse to accept or believe that there are different severities of autism and believe autism should just be 1 thing.

The dictionary definition of "spectrum" has 2 different meanings.

Quote:
1. a band of colours, as seen in a rainbow, produced by separation of the components of light by their different degrees of refraction according to wavelength.
2. used to classify something in terms of its position on a scale between two extreme points.


Autism is not like the colour spectrum, it's more like the latter. It has extremes, but I'm not saying everyone on the spectrum either has one extreme or the other. But some of us do.


I was a bit unusal as a child as I was tested and was ahead of my same age peers in some ways but was behind in others. I did not have a normal development. To this day I seem to be different to my same age peers and have found it hard to find like minded people to socialise with.

I feel for those whom are more severly autistic.... I know how hard it is to express myself and to find people whom understand...for those whom can't express themselves at all it must be aweful. I have great compassion for them and would never place myself above them.

Whilst the world is obsessed with Egoism I am not.

Infact (on a sideline) I am not an egoist but am stuck in the mental health system that is (I have been diagnosed with all sorts even though the diagnosis does not quite fit..typical for a female on the spectrum and I can quote studies where autistic females were misdiagnosed but I won't or this post will go on forever and NT's can't stand my waffling :P ).

I am personally ok with it as I can get in to my thing and well...

Anyway not into the ego crap, more insterested in understaning the other humans...

I have always felt different to them....they mystify me.

I think they apply too many labels.

What I see are souls.Living sentient beings with feelings.

Labels piss me off.



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11 Mar 2021, 9:27 am

I am Aspergers-like, but I like Autism or Autism Spectrum because then I am an ally for those with higher-level challenges. It's like people with burns ---- a 5% burn is a world away from a 50% burn but they are both burn victims. The environmental stress for me is some lower percentage than for a "classic" Autistic person but it is a similar underlying experience. The more stress I am under, the more "classic" I get. Likewise, I have seen "classic" persons with supportive accommodations become more "Aspie" like.



Earthbound_Alien
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11 Mar 2021, 12:01 pm

SharonB wrote:
I am Aspergers-like, but I like Autism or Autism Spectrum because then I am an ally for those with higher-level challenges. It's like people with burns ---- a 5% burn is a world away from a 50% burn but they are both burn victims. The environmental stress for me is some lower percentage than for a "classic" Autistic person but it is a similar underlying experience. The more stress I am under, the more "classic" I get. Likewise, I have seen "classic" persons with supportive accommodations become more "Aspie" like.


Yes I too can present as more autistic with stress.



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11 Mar 2021, 1:19 pm

Because my mum worked with some SLD kids who were LFA and really found life tough (eg mutism, banging their heads against walls, being 16 and unable to use the toilet independently, stuff like that) and I like most of my autistic traits, I used to think there was a huge gap between being aspie and being LFA.

Coming on this site, I've met LFA people who might be mute but who have rich minds which they express through writing on the forum. They might have some quirks I don't have but I'd be sad to have a world without people like them. I really hope they can do the basic life functioning stuff like toilet though & if they can't, I really hope they have help available to them.

I have no desire for a cure and call myself aspie as it's some sort of a more precise/less pathologised explanation of what I am. (Trying to say this without getting into the 'once you've met one autistic person' territory but...) my own particular type of autism loves specific language. If you have a word to make something more specific: use it and I'll appreciate it.

I sometimes remove the medicalising entirely and just call myself INTJ. That explains my personality just as much and is expressed both in strengths and weaknesses not just a negative thing.

As far as I see it, my disabling part of my autism is my sensory sensitivities. I wish there could be a cure that kept the same personality but got rid of my sensory sensitivities. Although I fear it would change entirely how I see things visually: other people I do art classes with don't see the tones and brightnesses of 'dull' colours quite so clearly as I do, for eg and they tell me they love my 'view of the world'. Literally - 8)


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11 Mar 2021, 4:39 pm

I have not LFA, I can speak rather normally, I even do not have many common symptoms of autism but I do not function high... Rather I am moderately-functioning. Not so bad to be unable of independent existence (for example due to lack of ability of going to the shop or doctor without other person who helps me), but not so good to be labelled as generally mildly affected (I have never had a close friend, even more romantic partner, I am very poor in earning money, I have never driven a car despite being above 29 years old).

I would say that I have a sort of autism, a pervasive developmental disorder, maybe even something like "multiple-complex developmental disorder" because I am diagnosed also with a schizophrenia-spectrum disorder and OCD. My intellectual profile may suggest some sort of NVLD. I might have less-known disorder named sluggish cognitive tempo or concentration deficit disorder since childhood. My sexuality was also peculiar since childhood.

In Poland I have social pension due to my disability which is quite hard to get and an individual really has to have severe mental disorder(s) to have it due to psychiatric reasons. People with only mild disorders just do not get it.



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11 Mar 2021, 4:52 pm

My diagnosis report says High Functioning Autism / Asperger Syndrome

I regard myself as Autistic and use this term to describe myself to others


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11 Mar 2021, 5:00 pm

I just get confused because in threads talking specifically about severity levels and autism it is always argued that there is no extremes and that "nobody is a little bit autistic" just like "nobody is a little bit pregnant" and all that. But then say if I see something in another thread like "autistics die before the age of 40" it's usually that they're saying that applies to severe autism only. So, what is severe autism if autism isn't supposed to have severity levels? :scratch:


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Edna3362
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11 Mar 2021, 5:24 pm

Officially Aspergers.
Actual autism range sits at 'level 1 to 2'. Level 1.5, but that doesn't exist. :lol:

Trait-wise, 'both'.
Not really 'either' -- and this is not even a personal observation from myself.


Otherwise? It's just a label to explain and present a complex thing with a simple thing.
I care not unless it serves it's purpose.

The static extremes and further dichotomies do not serve a lot of practical purpose for a lot of cases including mine.



Whenever it comes to labels, the part I truly care about is the purpose that comes out of it and how the context helps that purpose.

If the label does not serve nor resonate, does not truly equate nor aide one's quality of life...

Then the debates are simply meaningless. :lol: The stats and stereotypes are also meaningless.


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SharonB
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11 Mar 2021, 7:40 pm

Joe90 wrote:
I just get confused because in threads talking specifically about severity levels and autism it is always argued that there is no extremes and that "nobody is a little bit autistic" just like "nobody is a little bit pregnant" and all that. But then say if I see something in another thread like "autistics die before the age of 40" it's usually that they're saying that applies to severe autism only. So, what is severe autism if autism isn't supposed to have severity levels? :scratch:

I have been a little bit pregnant. Many times. In fact, when I said that to my sister and she said I couldn't be, inwardly I outright refuted it. Likewise, there are absolutely degrees of ASD traits and at different times we can be less or more. One person could have an average level on any number of characteristics and then there would the degree of variability relative to stress. So imagine my BFF who averages 6 on expressive language and varies 4-7, while I average 7 but vary 3-9. I know executive function is not part of the official diagnosis criteria, but I see ASD persons with low stress circumstances appear to have higher executive function, but turn on the stress and then "all of a sudden" they're low functioning (to their own surprise). I believe many ASD folks are very sensitive to outside factors (environmental and social), but have different thresholds for different things.



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11 Mar 2021, 7:47 pm

I am a "classic" autistic person who turned "Aspergian" after about the age of 6. I didn't say a word until I was 5 1/2, and in a research camp.

There are some cases of this.

There's a book called "Elijah's Cup," which is about a child who was very classically autistic until he was about 3-4 years old---then became Aspergian.



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12 Mar 2021, 3:55 pm

I was basically NT until the age of 4, then I was ADHD and AS (not diagnosed), then I was sort of between NT and AS at age 6-7, then ADHD and AS at 8 (got diagnosed with AS then), then I seemed more autistic for most of my teens, then bipolar-like in the first few years of adulthood, now I feel barely AS at all but very ADHD.


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12 Mar 2021, 8:06 pm

I was diagnosed with AS when I was 13. At first, I had no idea what the specialist who was working with me was talking about given I had a lot on my mind at the time.

I kept my diagnosis a secret until my senior year of high school.


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12 Mar 2021, 11:04 pm

It's all autism. Different levels of severity, but those may not be so easily measurable.



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12 Mar 2021, 11:13 pm

I actually think that putting autism and aspergers together and using functioning levels makes sense. And here's an anecdote I like to use to explain why. I go to a transition program for adults with developmental disabilities. My first year there were 3 of us young women who were very similar in terms of our social and life skills functioning abilities and it was easy to see how we all had the same condition e.g. autism. However, we each had a different diagnosis: Aspergers (me), Autistic Disorder, and PDD-NOS. That's because as children we all looked very different. One of my friends didn't speak until she was like 4 and presented very much as classic autism, whereas I never had a language delay and wasn't diagnosed until I was 17. But as young adults around the age of 20, we presented similarly and since we needed the same supports it would make sense if we had the same diagnosis as each other.

Now I am not a big fan of functioning labels. I think at times they can make distinctions where there doesn't need to be distinctions. Functioning labels can downplay someone's strengths in one direction and downplay their struggles in the other direction. However, we are stuck with needing some sort of label because of how huge a range autism is. I'm studying to be a special education teacher and this is the way I look at it. If I'm looking at a piece of paper about a student who is going to be in my class and it says autism, I'm going to need to have some general idea of what level of support this kid is going to need in the classroom. That's exactly what the DSM V functioning labels are all about: level of support needed.


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