Parole board asks TX Gov to pardon George Floyd re '04 bust

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funeralxempire
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06 Oct 2021, 7:25 pm

Parole board asks Texas governor to pardon George Floyd in 2004 drug bust

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A request to grant George Floyd a full posthumous pardon is headed to Texas Gov. Greg Abbott's desk after a public defender alleged Floyd was framed in a 2004 drug bust by a former Houston police detective now indicted on murder charges.

In a letter sent Monday to Floyd's one-time public defender Allison Mathis, the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles wrote it has "completed their consideration of your client's application requesting a Full Pardon and have voted to recommend clemency."

The board forwarded its recommendation to Abbott for final disposition. Abbott has not said whether he will grant the pardon.

Mathis filed the request in April, writing in the petition that a "pardon is being sought because it is just and right to clear a conviction that is not supported by evidence."

Floyd was arrested on Feb. 5, 2004, by then-Houston undercover narcotics detective Gerald Goines, who alleged Floyd provided a second suspect .03 grams of crack cocaine to sell, according to the petition. The man Floyd allegedly gave the drugs to turned out to be a police informant who sold the drugs to Goines as part of a sting operation and was not arrested or identified, according to the petition.

Floyd eventually pleaded guilty to a drug charge and was sentenced to 10 months in state jail, authorities said.

In August 2019, Goines was charged with two counts of murder related to a botched narcotics raid at a home in southeast Houston. Goines' police colleague, Steven Bryant, pleaded guilty in June to federal charges of falsifying records and interfering with a government investigation in an attempt to help Goines cover up an illegally obtained "no-knock" warrant on the Houston home of Rhogena Nicholas and her husband, Dennis Tuttle.

During the Jan. 28, 2019, raid, a shootout erupted in which Nicholas, Tuttle and their dog were killed and four police officers, including Goines, were shot and wounded.

In announcing the indictments of Goines and Bryant, Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg alleged that Goines made "numerous false statements" in the affidavit presented to the judge who signed the 'no-knock" warrant.

The scandal prompted the Harris County District Attorney to review at least 1,400 criminal cases tied to Goines.

Ogg released a statement on Monday supporting the Board of Pardons and Paroles' recommendation to grant Floyd clemency.

"We lament the loss of former Houstonian George Floyd and hope that his family finds comfort in Monday’s decision by the Texas State Board of Pardons and Paroles to recommend clemency for a 2004 conviction," Ogg's statement reads.

Mathis also praised the board's decision.

"A man was set up by a corrupt police officer intent on securing arrests rather than pursuing justice," Mathis said in a statement. "No matter what your political affiliation is, no matter who that man was in his life or in his death, that is not something we should stand for in the United States or in Texas."

Ben Crump, an attorney for the Floyd family, urged Abbott to grant the full pardon.

"This drug charge, which led to George Floyd’s conviction based on false evidence, helped to unravel his life," Crump said in a statement. "Similarly, tens of thousands of Black lives are ruined by a criminal justice system that uses the war on drugs to target Black people, force them into felony pleas, incarcerate them, take away their voting rights, and destroy their families."

Floyd died on May 25, 2020, as the result of injuries suffered when police in Minneapolis attempted to arrest him on suspicion of using a phony $20 bill to buy cigarettes. Former police officer Derek Chauvin, who pressed his knee into the back of Floyd's neck for more than nine minutes as the 46-year-old Black man lost consciousness after repeatedly claiming of not being able to breathe, was convicted in April of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

Chauvin was sentenced to 22 1/2 years in prison. Three other police officers charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter are scheduled to go on trial next year.


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Tim_Tex
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06 Oct 2021, 9:05 pm

Abbott won’t do it. He’s probably wearing a “Free Derek Chauvin” T-shirt even as I speak.


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DW_a_mom
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06 Oct 2021, 11:23 pm

There is serious doubt being cast about the conviction. It’s not like they went looking for a way to clean up Floyd’s record. They had a dirty cop and reopened his cases.


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TheRobotLives
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07 Oct 2021, 12:39 am

He pled guilty.

He likely confessed in court how he did this crime.


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DW_a_mom
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07 Oct 2021, 1:29 am

TheRobotLives wrote:
He pled guilty.

He likely confessed in court how he did this crime.


Pleading guilty doesn't mean one is guilty. It might mean they don't have the fight in them or the money, or feel the argument against them appears too strong. They can often get less time if they plead guilty and save the system time and money. It's more about weighing options than adhering to what the truth is.

The system itself is asking for the pardon. The system doesn't seek pardons unless it believes there is a wrong that needs to be righted.


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07 Oct 2021, 1:51 am

"This drug charge, which led to George Floyd’s conviction based on false evidence, helped to unravel his life," Crump said in a statement. "Similarly, tens of thousands of Black lives are ruined by a criminal justice system that uses the war on drugs to target Black people, force them into felony pleas, incarcerate them, take away their voting rights, and destroy their families."

Ironic, the downstream consequences of racism is quite breathtaking.



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07 Oct 2021, 5:37 am

DW_a_mom wrote:
TheRobotLives wrote:
He pled guilty.

He likely confessed in court how he did this crime.


Pleading guilty doesn't mean one is guilty. It might mean they don't have the fight in them or the money, or feel the argument against them appears too strong. They can often get less time if they plead guilty and save the system time and money. It's more about weighing options than adhering to what the truth is.

The system itself is asking for the pardon. The system doesn't seek pardons unless it believes there is a wrong that needs to be righted.

As part of his guilty plea, he would of been required to explain in detail how and why he did this crime.

He would of revealed details only the criminal would know, such as the location of the purchase.

Common practice is for the court (judge) to confirm that you're guilty of the crime you're pleading guilty to.


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TheRobotLives
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07 Oct 2021, 5:39 am

cyberdad wrote:
"This drug charge, which led to George Floyd’s conviction based on false evidence, helped to unravel his life," Crump said in a statement. "Similarly, tens of thousands of Black lives are ruined by a criminal justice system that uses the war on drugs to target Black people, force them into felony pleas, incarcerate them, take away their voting rights, and destroy their families."

Ironic, the downstream consequences of racism is quite breathtaking.

There was no false evidence, because no evidence was presented, because he pled guilty.


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Tim_Tex
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07 Oct 2021, 5:51 am

cyberdad wrote:
"This drug charge, which led to George Floyd’s conviction based on false evidence, helped to unravel his life," Crump said in a statement. "Similarly, tens of thousands of Black lives are ruined by a criminal justice system that uses the war on drugs to target Black people, force them into felony pleas, incarcerate them, take away their voting rights, and destroy their families."

Ironic, the downstream consequences of racism is quite breathtaking.


This is precisely why Abbott won’t legalize marijuana. He wants any excuse he can to throw black people in jail and take away their voting rights.


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kraftiekortie
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07 Oct 2021, 5:55 am

There was “evidence”—which seemed to have been planted by the cop.

It happens all the time.



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07 Oct 2021, 6:03 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
There was “evidence”—which seemed to have been planted by the cop.

It happens all the time.

The crime is about a drug deal between Floyd and another party.

No evidence was needed to convict Floyd, because he confessed.

He went before a judge, and said he did it.


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kraftiekortie
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07 Oct 2021, 7:42 am

I work in the criminal justice field. I happen to know that there are many ways in which cops and prosecutors could exert pressure upon a defendant to confess. One method is to keep the defendant in the interrogation room for hours. There are many more drastic methods.

People who are not involved in this--don't know this, and only think about what "should" occur under ideal circumstances.

Floyd is dead; there is no harm in pardoning him. But I don't feel Abbott will pardon him.



DW_a_mom
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07 Oct 2021, 8:40 am

TheRobotLives wrote:
DW_a_mom wrote:
TheRobotLives wrote:
He pled guilty.

He likely confessed in court how he did this crime.


Pleading guilty doesn't mean one is guilty. It might mean they don't have the fight in them or the money, or feel the argument against them appears too strong. They can often get less time if they plead guilty and save the system time and money. It's more about weighing options than adhering to what the truth is.

The system itself is asking for the pardon. The system doesn't seek pardons unless it believes there is a wrong that needs to be righted.

As part of his guilty plea, he would of been required to explain in detail how and why he did this crime.

He would of revealed details only the criminal would know, such as the location of the purchase.

Common practice is for the court (judge) to confirm that you're guilty of the crime you're pleading guilty to.


I think you are stretching a lot to get to the conclusion you want to get to. This isn't a mercy offer; it was part of an official review on the actions of a corrupt cop. The guilty plea is not meaningful; people plead guilty to trumped up charges all the time because they simply don't see an option. I can't say if his hands were perfectly clean, but clean enough for the district attorney to sign off on the clemency request. District attorneys and parole boards don't make these recommendations for politics or to be nice; they do it because their departments failed someone and they do not believe justice was served. Why do you insist on second guessing them?


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funeralxempire
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07 Oct 2021, 8:41 am

TheRobotLives wrote:
kraftiekortie wrote:
There was “evidence”—which seemed to have been planted by the cop.

It happens all the time.

The crime is about a drug deal between Floyd and another party.

No evidence was needed to convict Floyd, because he confessed.

He went before a judge, and said he did it.


None of that is relevant to whether or not he can be pardoned.
None of that is relevant to whether or not a pardon is appropriate given the overall set of circumstances.


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TheRobotLives
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07 Oct 2021, 9:07 am

funeralxempire wrote:
None of that is relevant to whether or not he can be pardoned.
None of that is relevant to whether or not a pardon is appropriate given the overall set of circumstances.

The facts of his conviction are relevant, because there has to be some reason to pardon him.

Do you think his crime should not of been prosecuted (because of entrapment)?


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funeralxempire
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07 Oct 2021, 9:17 am

TheRobotLives wrote:
funeralxempire wrote:
None of that is relevant to whether or not he can be pardoned.
None of that is relevant to whether or not a pardon is appropriate given the overall set of circumstances.

The facts of his conviction are relevant, because there has to be some reason to pardon him.

Do you think his crime should not of been prosecuted (because of entrapment)?


I'm not familiar enough with the details to have any comment on how his lawyer should have approached defence while it was an open case and it's not really relevant. I'm advocating for a pardon, not presenting a case for an acquittal.

We're talking about a dead guy who appears to have been setup by a cop who the police now acknowledge was a criminal. Every case that criminal touched should receive renewed scrutiny to ensure justice was actually done. As for Floyd the pardon would only really be a symbolic good-will gesture.


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