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graywyvern
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04 Nov 2021, 5:08 pm

...than "autdar" (on the model of "gaydar"), which is ingenious but hardly suggests what it means, at first glance: the innate ability of autistic people to spot other autistic people...

it's also terrible-sounding (to me, anyway). any ideas?

m.


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Fnord
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04 Nov 2021, 5:14 pm

Aut-dar, just like aspie-dar, is a myth, so call it whatever you will.

But if you disagree, then put it to the test. The next time a stranger shows up on your aut-dar, walk straight up to that person, make eye-contact, and ask that person, “Are you autistic?”

I have read too many accounts wherein people claim to be able to know when another person is on the spectrum when they have never verified their alleged “knowledge”.

Mere belief proves nothing.



Ettina
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04 Nov 2021, 7:16 pm

Fnord wrote:
But if you disagree, then put it to the test. The next time a stranger shows up on your aut-dar, walk straight up to that person, make eye-contact, and ask that person, “Are you autistic?”


And what if they're autistic and don't know it? So many people are undiagnosed.

Anyway, my experience volunteering with disabled children has shown that my autdar is pretty accurate. Most of the kids I suspected were autistic had been diagnosed autistic, and the kids that didn't seem autistic to me usually had other diagnoses. Only one I got wrong was dual-diagnosed autistic and Down Syndrome - I pegged the Down Syndrome but not the autism.



naturalplastic
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04 Nov 2021, 7:32 pm

autisticdar

autiedar



enz
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04 Nov 2021, 7:42 pm

Fnord wrote:
Aut-dar, just like aspie-dar, is a myth, so call it whatever you will.


I disagree, peoples behaviour can hint there on the spectrum



ProfessorJohn
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04 Nov 2021, 9:56 pm

Most NTs can pretty quickly spot that there is something "off" about us.



theprisoner
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04 Nov 2021, 10:10 pm

enz wrote:
Fnord wrote:
Aut-dar, just like aspie-dar, is a myth, so call it whatever you will.


I disagree, peoples behaviour can hint there on the spectrum


I also agree to disagree. I have an uncanny ability to spot autistic traits very quickly, with high probability.


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timf
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05 Nov 2021, 6:12 am

A person with a high degree of familiarity with his own unique traits may be a little more sensitive to identifying those traits in others. However, I would be reluctant to consider this a "super power". Rather one might see in five minutes what it might take others to notice in seven minutes.

It would also fail to consider those traits with which a person is not as familiar (whether he has them himself or not).

There may not be a definitive word for something so elusive as not being able to tell if a new arrival at a social function suddenly left because of social anxiety or because he left his keys in the car.



DuckHairback
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05 Nov 2021, 8:01 am

I can't see how it's different from saying you have 'copdar' because you can identify members of the police force with a high level of accuracy.

It's just grouping typical attributes isn't it? I don't feel like there's much mysterious going on when someone who spends a lot of time thinking about autism (because they have it or their job is identifying it) is able to identify people who have it.



Fnord
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05 Nov 2021, 8:10 am

enz wrote:
Fnord wrote:
Aut-dar, just like aspie-dar, is a myth, so call it whatever you will...
I disagree, peoples behaviour can hint there on the spectrum
Hints are not evidence; and therefore prove nothing.
theprisoner wrote:
I also agree to disagree. I have an uncanny ability to spot autistic traits very quickly, with high probability.
What numerical value do you attribute to this "probability"?  How do you validate it?

So how do you all check for accuracy -- "I believe it, and that settles it"?

Sorry, kids; but that is not good enough.  Mere belief proves nothing.



kraftiekortie
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05 Nov 2021, 8:28 am

Sometimes, you can tell right off, with a decent degree of accuracy, that someone is autistic.

Other times, it takes an extended period of observing that person.

"Autiedar" is certainly not infallible.

Not even "gaydar" is infallible.



Pieplup
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05 Nov 2021, 8:29 am

graywyvern wrote:
...than "autdar" (on the model of "gaydar"), which is ingenious but hardly suggests what it means, at first glance: the innate ability of autistic people to spot other autistic people...

it's also terrible-sounding (to me, anyway). any ideas?

m.

I've been told it hjas to do with this intense look in their eyes. [/color]


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Fnord
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05 Nov 2021, 8:33 am

Lots of claims, no evidence.



Redpaws
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05 Nov 2021, 8:43 am

Ettina wrote:
Fnord wrote:
But if you disagree, then put it to the test. The next time a stranger shows up on your aut-dar, walk straight up to that person, make eye-contact, and ask that person, “Are you autistic?”


And what if they're autistic and don't know it? So many people are undiagnosed.

And also: why would they confirm it to a stranger? i would definitely find it rude and invasive if someone just walked up to me and asked me that


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Fnord
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05 Nov 2021, 8:46 am

Redpaws wrote:
Ettina wrote:
Fnord wrote:
But if you disagree, then put it to the test. The next time a stranger shows up on your aut-dar, walk straight up to that person, make eye-contact, and ask that person, “Are you autistic?”
And what if they're autistic and don't know it? So many people are undiagnosed.
And also: why would they confirm it to a stranger? i would definitely find it rude and invasive if someone just walked up to me and asked me that
You have missed the point completely.

If a person claims to have some special ability, and that person fails to prove the claim, then the person does not have the ability.



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05 Nov 2021, 10:21 am

I can think of varying alternative terms.

If it's a pattern recognition through familiar experience, usually hypothesized and confirmed with empirical evidence... It is simply called familiarity.

If it's just a hypothesis, and the basis is coming from the subjective first hand experience or theory of mind and conclude from there... It's basically a form of self projection or sympathy.

If it's just gut feeling, not sourced from either experience but the lack of; it's either a form of intuition or a form of guest.

And if it's derived from what NOT being an allistic act and look like, and may reference from stereotypes... It's a form of deduction.


One can lead to another. Or switch. Or overlap.


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