Can language delay still be diagnosed with Asperger's

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Joe90
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26 Nov 2021, 4:10 pm

I think I had trouble following verbal instructions, but I don't know if that's part of language delay or not. I also had trouble explaining things - which I still do to this day, not where it notices but I feel other people on WP are better at explaining things using big words and understanding complicated things in detail. I have difficulty with that.


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26 Nov 2021, 4:21 pm

I think back in the 90s, they were reluctant to diagnose kids with autism for some reason. I had a language delay and got diagnosed as "on the borderline" of Asperger's as a result. I don't think they used a test for autism on me.

I had trouble stringing sentences together, listening and required speech therapy.

They thought I had a form of epilepsy at first because I kept daydreaming and couldn't hear people. That used to happen in school all the time, and it would madden some teachers. I had to have a support worker to basically keep me "awake" and paying attention.


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Joe90
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26 Nov 2021, 4:35 pm

smudge wrote:
I think back in the 90s, they were reluctant to diagnose kids with autism for some reason. I had a language delay and got diagnosed as "on the borderline" of Asperger's as a result. I don't think they used a test for autism on me.

I had trouble stringing sentences together, listening and required speech therapy.

They thought I had a form of epilepsy at first because I kept daydreaming and couldn't hear people. That used to happen in school all the time, and it would madden some teachers. I had to have a support worker to basically keep me "awake" and paying attention.


I had a support worker, so I don't know how I would have been if I didn't have one. I would have probably been a "stereotypical" ADHD student (being extremely disruptive, never doing my homework, never finishing my work, getting expelled). But I relied on my support worker to do all the listening and organising for me, so I had it easy (which was why I was never diagnosed with ADHD, although one or two teachers suggested I could have ADHD). Instead the psychiatrists were just hell-bent on getting me an Asperger's label.


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kraftiekortie
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26 Nov 2021, 4:47 pm

They didn't have these sorts of services when I went to school.

If I disrupted the class, I was just sent either to the Guidance Counselor, or the guy who ran the Resource Room.



Joe90
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26 Nov 2021, 4:56 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
They didn't have these sorts of services when I went to school.

If I disrupted the class, I was just sent either to the Guidance Counselor, or the guy who ran the Resource Room.


I think if I was growing up in the 1970s instead of the 1990s, I would probably have not been diagnosed with an ASD at all, I probably would have just got the cane several times. In a way I think that would have been less stressful than all those psychiatric appointments and assessments I had to keep attending and being observed closely like a bug under a microscope.


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26 Nov 2021, 8:08 pm

It's how my case is, actually -- no speech delay but has language learning and developmental issues.

Not the little professor type obviously. Nor the aphasiac like nonverbal either.
Instead, I have a form of hyperlexia -- without the precocious reading or NVLD, which is basically able to read stuff out loud but with poor reading comprehension.

It can superficially looked like some high level verbal ability, except it's actually an illusion made of brute force memorization, pattern recognition and an element of echolalia.

I have below average verbal IQ, and definitely had a form of language delay.
I'm one of those who definitely supposed to have the autism label instead of Aspergers if it weren't for speech milestones.

The same can be applied towards my own hearing and processing someone's speech and language.


In EF-wise (leaning towards ADHD) language issues, it is to do with receptive auditory processing, short term memory, processing speed and attention span.
Some may even say other academic learning disabilities like dyslexia or dyscalculia are very tied to ADHD.

... And you had mentioned to have dyscalculia. But we're talking about language issues here.


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Joe90
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26 Nov 2021, 8:35 pm

Yes I have dyscalculia. I am very poor at math and anything to do with numbers, shapes, measurements, mechanical or technical terms - anything like that. But I'm very good with spelling and writing stories (despite my difficulties using big words or explaining things but like I said it isn't noticeably bad enough to affect my daily life).

I had glue ear when I was 4, resulting in hard of hearing, so that might have caused the language delays.


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CarlM
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26 Nov 2021, 11:44 pm

smudge wrote:
I think back in the 90s, they were reluctant to diagnose kids with autism for some reason. I had a language delay and got diagnosed as "on the borderline" of Asperger's as a result. I don't think they used a test for autism on me.


It's no mystery why they "were reluctant to diagnose kids with autism". Under DSM-III, autism was still considered psychotic and until the late 1970s doctors routinely recommended autistic kids be institutionalized. So they wanted to have another name to use at first as to not scare parents. I think they always realized that it is a spectrum and not at all neatly divided into two types. I was not diagnosed as a kid, since only classic autism was recognized. I had minor speech delay and certainly eye contact issues, etc. The doctor told my mother "don't worry, some kids start speaking a little later". Yeah, like some ASD kids, but this was 1960.

I agree with the decision to put it all under one diagnosis of ASD. I'm sure I would have been diagnosed as Asperger's under DSM-4, but I don't find that distinction to be useful of than being not classic autism.


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27 Nov 2021, 12:29 am

I have average verbal ability which apparently is a disability relative to my superior non-verbal skills. So I am outwardly Asperger's (no language delay) and inwardly Autistic (language delay) - b/c as others said, it's a spectrum and outward appearances aren't a great judge of inward experience. I was recently evaluated and my dr said in many ways I am "mild" Autistic and in other ways I am "moderate" Autistic. As I was preparing for my evaluation I realized how much I struggle internally. Although I am considered talkative and expressive, it's like I'm talking (and listening) through molasses. I outwardly appear as Asperger's. He said in my case I compensate outwardly for SIGNIFICANT verbal and language difficulties. So although many verbal and reading skills are "average" or "above average" - he diagnosed me with learning disabilities b/c they would be way above that given my non-verbal abilities. My NT dad and NT son are examples in a more balanced skills (strong all around); while my ASD daughter takes after me: internal language brilliance but "average" (in her case borderline "below average") outward appearance - she tests 90 percentile in (written) verbal, but can barely hold a conversation relative to that. So I didn't have outwardly noticeable verbal or reading difficulties as a child, but inwardly I did (and do). I re-read and re-write my posts too much. For example, for this one I moved my last sentence to the top b/c I begin with details and then draw a conclusion, when folks prefer the reverse. I see I am being repetitive in this one and would typically take the time to whittle it down to half its length, but I'm tired and will show you how I write without "make up". Even saying I was cutting back I reread this and revised it at near 10 times. It would be more otherwise. I was just about to read it one more time ---- but will let it be. Ha. Oops, I re-read it and revised it again. Darn. OK, that was it. Really.



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27 Nov 2021, 7:44 am

yes, NT people can have struggles with speech too, it is not just an autistic "thing". the diagnosis of autism comes from having struggles in all 3 major sectors of DSM, communication, social, and inflexibility of thought or behavior patterns.


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ezbzbfcg2
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27 Nov 2021, 7:55 am

Doesn't it reflect speech problems at time of diagnosis? That is, when the OP was diagnosed, she was deemed to be speaking decently, hence no noticeable speech delay, thus Asperger's.

Also, speech problems/remedial speech classes aren't just for those who aren't speaking properly, or not speaking at all. They also apply to those with selective mutism...those who can talk but don't.



kraftiekortie
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27 Nov 2021, 8:06 am

The Asperger’s diagnosis reflected a person’s past, as well as a person’s present.

If there was a documented past history of a significant generalized speech delay, Asperger’s wouldn’t have been diagnosed, if the criteria were strictly applied.



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21 Dec 2021, 4:48 am

I was diagnosed as an adult just before the DSM-5 came out in 2013. I had a speech delay as a child, and during my assessment as an adult I thought I might get a diagnosis of HFA or PDD-NOS. But apparently by then some diagnosticians considered the speech delay criterion to be increasingly irrelevant, and I was given a diagnosis of AS. Not that it matters much now, since they've all been replaced by the broader diagnosis of ASD.


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