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DavidJSNSW64
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05 Jan 2022, 5:53 pm

I understand the concept of neurodiversity but for me, autism is nonetheless a form of disability. I believe in the social model of disability where, among other things, social change to make life easier for people with disability should be a priority over forcing individuals to conform at the convenience of society. Nonetheless, I don't think it is useful to deny my disability and the following disabling problems.

For instance, autism often comes with depression and anxiety. These are disabling for me. I know people with autism have a problem with executive functioning. I certainly do and it has caused a lifetime of organisational problems.

So I guess my point is that I get the concept of neurodiversity but I don't want to see autism dismissed as merely another way of thinking when it can be a serious disability.



ToughDiamond
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05 Jan 2022, 6:09 pm

I agree. It's silly to be so black-and-white about ASD as to insist it's just a difference or just a disability. It's both.



Edna3362
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05 Jan 2022, 7:56 pm

Only the individual itself knows where their disability ends and where their own neurodiversity begins -- or, if it exists at all.


The blur of the two dichotomies usually starts in management and attitudes of both the individual and society that directly affects quality of life and functioning.


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ASPartOfMe
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05 Jan 2022, 8:25 pm

Welcome to Wrong Planet.

This is not a binary situation. Neurodiversity and disability often co exist

In my case there are definitely parts of my autism that would disable me in the most autistic friendly society. But society makes them a lot worse.


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autisticelders
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06 Jan 2022, 9:20 am

right there with you OP, I view my autism as a handicap and definitely not a gift.


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Double Retired
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07 Jan 2022, 5:13 pm

I've done well-enough in life that I think I would look silly trying now to persuade people that I was disabled. I'm more like a computer whose software has some functionality disabled. Oh, and a lot of functionality partially disabled.

But if you've met one Autistic you've met one Autistic. I understand that we are all different and affected differently by our Autism.

But I strongly agree with:

Quote:
social change to make life easier for people with disability should be a priority over forcing individuals to conform at the convenience of society
I'll go further and suggest that many changes that improved our lives would also be beneficial (to a lesser degree, perhaps) for everyone.


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Kitty4670
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07 Jan 2022, 6:34 pm

I wish I understood this.


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