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Tim_Tex
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22 Sep 2007, 11:05 pm

Talk about your favorite topics in the world of Transportation.

Tim


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Tim_Tex
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22 Sep 2007, 11:46 pm

Why is Interstate 35 the only freeway that splits into "W" and "E" portions? It does this in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, as well as in the Twin Cities.

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Jutty
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23 Sep 2007, 12:00 pm

I-95 does something similar in northern New Jersey but is not labled E and W portions.



Tim_Tex
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23 Sep 2007, 12:48 pm

Jutty wrote:
I-95 does something similar in northern New Jersey but is not labled E and W portions.


Doesn't I-95 disappear at one point?

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V001
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23 Sep 2007, 1:27 pm

There is a part of New Jersey the locals would not allow I-95 to be built so a bypass was made see this site.
http://www.njfreeways.com/Interstate_95 ... _NJTP.html



Tim_Tex
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23 Sep 2007, 1:32 pm

I also like the story behind I-238 in California, how it defied the traditional Interstate numbering system.

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23 Sep 2007, 9:21 pm

I am always obsessed with subway and light commuter rail systems, especially the electric lines. My favorites are the DC metrorail, and the New York subway system. The two systems are sort of polar opposites of each other in their design. Starting with architecture, it's quite different the way the stations are designed. New York's subway stations have low ceilings, exposed beams, and old-world tile work that is quite attractive. DC's metrorail has high, arched ceilings, indirect lighting and modern (for the 70's at least) architecture. The rail cars are even different. Even new York's latest look like old-time pullman cars, while DC's sort of resemble something out of a sci-fi flick. The inside of the New york rail cars have only hard surfaces and bare metal, while the DC metrorail cars have padded seats and carpeting.

New York being the first subway system in the USA was built using cut and cover techniques where the road was excavated and the tunnel erected, while the DC metrorail. the youngest subway system in the USA was built using tunnel boring that did not disturb the streets above. When the DC metrorail system came out it was largely automated, while the New York Subway system was all manually operated. Today, the New York system is partially automated. In the seventies too, when the DC metrorail system was installed, it used sophisticated PWM motor speed controllers on the trains, while New york's simply used resitive shunts to control the power to the motors like they had done since it came out.

One of the neat factoids I like about the New York subway system is that it had it's own coal fired power plant to run it. This was due to all the competing electrical standards that were in place in various neighborhoods at the turn of the century. Instead of trying to convert all the odd power standards to run the train, they just made their own power and distributed it around the city. This also gave the system an element of reliability because if neighborhood power went out in an area, the subway would still be able to run.



Tim_Tex
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24 Sep 2007, 6:37 am

AV-geek wrote:
I am always obsessed with subway and light commuter rail systems, especially the electric lines. My favorites are the DC metrorail, and the New York subway system. The two systems are sort of polar opposites of each other in their design. Starting with architecture, it's quite different the way the stations are designed. New York's subway stations have low ceilings, exposed beams, and old-world tile work that is quite attractive. DC's metrorail has high, arched ceilings, indirect lighting and modern (for the 70's at least) architecture. The rail cars are even different. Even new York's latest look like old-time pullman cars, while DC's sort of resemble something out of a sci-fi flick. The inside of the New york rail cars have only hard surfaces and bare metal, while the DC metrorail cars have padded seats and carpeting.

New York being the first subway system in the USA was built using cut and cover techniques where the road was excavated and the tunnel erected, while the DC metrorail. the youngest subway system in the USA was built using tunnel boring that did not disturb the streets above. When the DC metrorail system came out it was largely automated, while the New York Subway system was all manually operated. Today, the New York system is partially automated. In the seventies too, when the DC metrorail system was installed, it used sophisticated PWM motor speed controllers on the trains, while New york's simply used resitive shunts to control the power to the motors like they had done since it came out.

One of the neat factoids I like about the New York subway system is that it had it's own coal fired power plant to run it. This was due to all the competing electrical standards that were in place in various neighborhoods at the turn of the century. Instead of trying to convert all the odd power standards to run the train, they just made their own power and distributed it around the city. This also gave the system an element of reliability because if neighborhood power went out in an area, the subway would still be able to run.


Until a month ago, I lived in Houston, and we got a light rail system in 2002 (?), and it's only one line, from Reliant Park to the UHD (Univ. of Houston-Downtown).

Tim


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hyperbolic
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24 Sep 2007, 1:12 pm

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Why is Interstate 35 the only freeway that splits into "W" and "E" portions? It does this in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, as well as in the Twin Cities.

Tim


Normally, now, any additional spur off an interstate is supposed to have a incremented number before the interstates number. For example, not saying these exist: I-165, I-265, I-365, and so on. Before this standard, other classifications such as "W", "E," "spur," (which I've seen) and others might have been used. This standard is good because I-35W might already be used in some areas for a singular section of the highway to denote just the westbound lanes and I-35E the eastbound lands. (In Dallas-Fort Worth, there are two separate highways.)

Nearby where I live there is a US highway given an "Alternate" designation, as well as non-standard blue "Appalachian Development" road signs. I don't think either of those things really simplifies traffic routing. Moreover, some highways nearby have multiple routes carried on them for miles.

I have some ideas about road design and allotment of funds. I know our state legislature throws money around just to stay incumbent. This is wrong on two levels. Instead of investing in high-growth (and, thus, high-traffic) corridors, they invest in the middle of nowhere. This leaves the high-growth corridors choked out of further growth, and creates growth in the middle of nowhere. (A new four-lane anywhere, even in the middle of nowhere, it seems, is a haven for strip malls and fast food joints.) Then you have to bother with the traffic in one high-growth area and the growing traffic in an area that had no need for a four-lane before, but now has one and the traffic to boot. You spend money making repairs to the four-lane in that remote area when the highway in the high growth area should be upgraded with more lanes and to freeway grade.



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02 Oct 2007, 5:03 am

I have lately become fascinated with abandoned state/U.S. highways, most of them in Arizona.

Tim


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krankes_hirn
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02 Oct 2007, 1:33 pm

I am obsessed with aviation and air traffic control. Anyone shares this obsession?



Stockton
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02 Oct 2007, 3:29 pm

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I am obsessed with aviation and air traffic control. Anyone shares this obsession?


A little bit, I think.



Tim_Tex
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03 Oct 2007, 4:34 pm

krankes_hirn wrote:
I am obsessed with aviation and air traffic control. Anyone shares this obsession?


I play Flight Simulator a lot, so it's safe to say I am becoming fascinated with air travel.

I also like sea travel as well, and I often read magazines about yachts.

Tim


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Stockton
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03 Oct 2007, 6:39 pm

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I also like sea travel as well, and I often read magazines about yachts.


I'm also occasionally interested in sea travel. I'm so lucky to live in a part of the world with one of the world's largest ferry systems...



Tim_Tex
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22 Oct 2007, 11:08 pm

I have been fascinated with Arizona State Highway 89T, which used to be a portion of U.S. Highway 89. The road is now abandoned, and probably has been since the 1950s. There is a one-lane bridge that was built in 1911, with wooden curbs.

Tim


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