Anyone memorize all the wrong facts for the school tests?

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Brian003
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12 Oct 2007, 9:55 pm

Is it just me that seems to memorize all the things that the teachers don't bother to ask as test questions?

Like when I am reading an Economics book I will memorize that the GDP per country is that greatest indicator of producing olympic athletes but I don't even bother with memorizing foreign direct investment which is in my notes.

I noticed that on the multiple choice tests it will seem like everything I memorized is useless.

I don't really see how it is so easy for people with AS to pull up the 4.0 GPA grades points, I have an extremely hard time on the standardized tests and I have to study more than average just to get a B.



xyzyxx
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12 Oct 2007, 10:42 pm

I don't study at all. I do fine on tests just by paying close attention in class.



lastcrazyhorn
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12 Oct 2007, 11:22 pm

I'm always studying the wrong things; especially in math/science classes. I totally feel you on that.


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luckbug
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13 Oct 2007, 2:46 am

LOL yes I have done that and I'm usually awesome on tests. I memorize information that it too specific than what the teacher wants- like that many examples of "classical" Greek art are actually Roman copies in marble. really got me the last test. All of my answers were technically correct. Oh well. I have also noticed that when I focus, it is never on what I "should" be doing. *shrug* One thing I have learned about having AS is that I can't do everything the same way as other people- I have to find a different way to work. This makes school hell sometimes, and it sounds like you are going through the same thing. Hang in there- in the long run passing is passing. Grades aren't as important as what you learn, and you are obviously learning. So what if it's not what they test you on?



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13 Oct 2007, 6:38 pm

My physics class is one you can never study enough for. I hate having to fish for the right formulas, and hardly anything on the test is visible to the naked eye in the textbook. Hopefully my 3000 practice problems book will help me organize my mental blocks.


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Lautbiru
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19 Oct 2007, 3:13 am

For me it's very different. The exams always ask something that is not in anything the lecturers asked me to study.



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19 Oct 2007, 12:21 pm

I always found that I had less trouble with the material in the courses and way more trouble figuring out what it was the instructor wanted from me. It would take a couple of weeks to scope out what they thought was important and wanted me to regurgitate and in what form to them. (Note, this was not necessarily what I - or other instructors - thought was important.) Usually had to take one test, in a class where we got feedback on tests (I hated those classes where there were only one or two tests the whole semester!), at least, to scope them.

I did have two excellent instructors - one was a psychiatric nurse who was moonlighting teaching writing. She would tear my papers apart, point out ways that they could be better or other avenues to explore, then let me put them back together again and resubmit for a final grade. I learned so much from her! The other was my "Intro to Western Civ" class Prof. I'd been out of high school for over a decade when I went to that college, and I was clueless as to how do a proper essay exam. He did the same thing, although he had 300+ kids in that class. I found him when he wasn't in class, asked how to make it better when I got a "B" on my first exam, and he sat down with me for an hour and explained various strategies and presentation methods. Learned a lot more than the names of Greek and Roman sculpture from him! :)

The rest of the classes - the material was either already outdated, would be outdated by the time I graduated, is now outdated, or has not been something I have ever needed to use or reference since then. I do still enjoy the literature I amassed in the English Lit classes, though. For what it is.