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alhna
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04 Aug 2011, 12:10 am

...



Last edited by alhna on 08 Aug 2011, 2:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Androidraptor
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07 Aug 2011, 3:23 pm

Bagging groceries. I though it sounded simple enough and since I don't have any higher education yet my options are pretty limited to simple things like that or fast food. Plus I've been told I'm pretty mildly affected, so I figured I should be fine.

AHAHA NO.

I didn't realize I had sensory issues until I started working this job. The fact that I feel like I'm going to die if I'm stuck on that noisy, crowded, fluorescent-lighty ledge of desolation for more than an hour made me find out the hard way that yes I do get sensory overload. The baggers also go and get the carts off the lot, which is something most of them hate but I'll beg to do because it's much easier for me to deal with. I live in the deep south and the summers are miserable, and sometimes the heat really gets to me on lot until I remind myself "well, you could be in there bagging!" :lol:

It's gotten to the point where I think the best thing for me to do is find another job somewhere else, better suited to how I function. I've already started brainstorming and looking into my options, just need to start pursuing them.

At least I know my limits now! And that I should avoid cashiering like the plague because that seems even worse.



CarolT
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08 Aug 2011, 5:00 am

Working in a supermarket..I know.
The stress,the crowds of people..just too much pressure.I only do 4 hours a day,4 days a week and it totally kills me.Some days are better than others but even those are difficult.



Palakol
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08 Aug 2011, 6:23 am

Chummy wrote:
Quote:
soldiers, who are always in a group, no privacy. anything that has to do with teamwork, like a coach or a professional football player


Oh right, this. Defiteinly the worst job for aspies. Worst than anything I listed so far. Only 9 AS people joined the army where I live and all of them suffered badly. But I mean real bad...


Well on the plus side, you tend to remain strangely calm under pressure when the sh*t hits the fan. Bombs are going off all around you and you seem all unemotional about it (probably because you haven't processed the idea of danger just yet.). You also aren't really expected to have that much social skills, especially as a grunt. And the rules and the chain of command are rather well-structured and easier to understand than social standing. But yeah, I guess the stress of people, and constantly being told what to do, and the required hand-eye coordination and balance and quick reaction-time, and the listening and remembering and following instructions, etc. can lead to at best, an emotional breakdown, and at worst, getting your teammates killed.



AnonymousAnonymous
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19 Aug 2011, 3:45 pm

Working for Home Depot or Lowe's


_________________
Silly NTs, I have Aspergers, and having Aspergers is gr-r-reat!


47x
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23 Aug 2011, 5:26 am

I don't know if anyone posted this before or not. But I'll add Postman to the list.

I've been working for 4-5 months now for a company here in Sweden. I was hired to work part time and just that is so stressfull, they sent me a SMS the day before or just a few hours before they wanted me to come to work. So I didn't have an actual schedule and that made me anxious and stressed. Then, while at work, we had max. 3 hours to deliver the mail (by bicycle) no matter how much mail or the weather. The times I was too slow, my boss came up to me and told me to hurry up more next time. Which of course added to the amount of stress and anxiety I had. And the salary was a joke.



MissDorkness
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23 Aug 2011, 9:24 am

SilverProteus wrote:
Public speaker. (for those with social anxiety, that is.)
I actually find it easier to speak to a group while giving a presentation than I do speaking more intimately with most folks.

It was a bit nerve-wracking at first, but, I've grown to like it. It's much easier to control, giving a talk, than any conversation one could have.



MissDorkness
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23 Aug 2011, 9:35 am

Dione wrote:
I survived working as a cashier/waitress for nearly three years and will tell you that it's not quite as difficult for aspies as one would expect, considering I am on the low extreme as symptoms go. The regulars were pretty easy going and loved how as soon as I saw them coming I would have everything ready. My boss had explained that serving people was the ultimate goal of my job, so I made it my number one priority to memorize everything; in fact I had over one hundred people's regular orders as well as proper spelling of everyone's name.
The only people I couldn't handle were the snowbirds; a lot of them were jerks. The ones from the south were the worst, because I speak a lot faster than most people from my city and they didn't like that and they loved to make fun of the way I said coffee.
I did cashiering, but, couldn't wait tables (physically disabled and unable to lift the heavy trays without dropping something).
Cashiering was okay, because you're only with people a short time, and you can pretty much script it, they're not usually there long enough for things to get awkward.
I did other things, like assembling displays, doing calligraphy for our price signs... and I memorized regular takeout orders and the part numbers of dozens of items in the shop.
Some people were really big jerks though... tourists, rich folks. Not to mention the arrogant-saa traveling musicians and athletes who'd pop in and assume you're as available as anything else on the takeout menu.
Luckily, due to my deadpan voice and logical approach, people didn't eff with me too much... and, in fact, I was often asked to step in and stick up for other employees when they were being mistreated by customers. ~baffled~ ~shrug~
My favorite was covering my disdain for people who would lie to get free things.



MissDorkness
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23 Aug 2011, 9:40 am

bluecountry wrote:
What about being:
-A financial analyst who handles investments?
-An accountant?
-Logistics coordinator?
I actually liked working in accounting. I was a temp during summers at the office my Grandmother worked at.

The work was great. Numbers and sorting and paper trails.

The only bad part was being in a cube farm with a bunch of hens nattering about shallow nonsensical bs.
I'm glad I switched majors.



Knifey
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23 Aug 2011, 9:46 am

caffeine_demon wrote:
5 - customer services


i quite like working for myself in my computer repair business, my customers love me but i can't sell myself so i don't get the business lol.