Tri-City Doctor Signs Monkey's Death Order

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ShadesOfMe
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11 Mar 2008, 5:14 pm

KingdomOfRats
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11 Mar 2008, 6:06 pm

Don't understand....how does killing the monkey after biting the humans prevent them from getting rabies even if the monkey had it?



Monkeys are not always bad as pets but are not really suitable as wild animals,dad had one in the seventies,in Tipperary,he went everywhere with him on his shoulder.


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11 Mar 2008, 9:20 pm

KingdomOfRats wrote:
Don't understand....how does killing the monkey after biting the humans prevent them from getting rabies even if the monkey had it?


There are two ways to test for rabies; one is to quarantine the suspected animal to see how it behaves over a period of time, and one is to test brain tissue (which, of course, requires the animal to be dead). Depending on how long ago the monkey bite those people, there may not be enough time left to do the first process; in any case, they tend to favor the tissue analysis, because it's more accurate.

There are rabies shots that can save lives, but they are (or at least they were) expensive; they're also quite painful and very numerous, spanning over a long period of time. If it's confirmed that the monkey had rabies, then the victims would have to get shots; if it's confirmed that the monkey didn't have rabies, then they won't need the shots, because they couldn't have come into contact with the disease, at least through the monkey.

Basically then, killing the monkey allows them to test and determine whether or not shots are actually necessary. The people would probably not want to go through with multiple, painful shots if they didn't need to. If they didn't have the shots, there'd be no point in killing the monkey.

It's unfortunate that the monkey had to be put down, but it happens to many types of animals of all varieties. A few raccoons were distempered a few years back, and they had to be put down; no one protested about them.


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EvilKimEvil
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11 Mar 2008, 9:47 pm

ShadesOfMe wrote:
http://www.kndo.com/Global/story.asp?S=7995169&nav=menu484_2

Monkeys shouldn't be pets. :(


I agree that monkeys do not make good pets. I can't say they should never exist in captivity because there are probably some people who can provide good care for them, and there will always be rescue situations. It's problematic that so many people choose a pet based on superficial reasons and don't consider the reality of the animal's needs.

The rabies issue is a serious problem with exotic pet mammals. Several years ago in Maine, two pet wolves had to be killed because one bit a lady, she didn't know which one it was, and rabies vaccines are not proven to be effective in wolves. Even worse, it was essentially her fault that she was bitten: she was trespassing and she knew the wolves were on the property. But the authorities sided with her, she went unpunished, and the dead wolves tested negative for rabies.



ShadesOfMe
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12 Mar 2008, 7:11 pm

EvilKimEvil wrote:
ShadesOfMe wrote:
http://www.kndo.com/Global/story.asp?S=7995169&nav=menu484_2

Monkeys shouldn't be pets. :(


I agree that monkeys do not make good pets. I can't say they should never exist in captivity because there are probably some people who can provide good care for them, and there will always be rescue situations. It's problematic that so many people choose a pet based on superficial reasons and don't consider the reality of the animal's needs.

The rabies issue is a serious problem with exotic pet mammals. Several years ago in Maine, two pet wolves had to be killed because one bit a lady, she didn't know which one it was, and rabies vaccines are not proven to be effective in wolves. Even worse, it was essentially her fault that she was bitten: she was trespassing and she knew the wolves were on the property. But the authorities sided with her, she went unpunished, and the dead wolves tested negative for rabies.


I agree, if n animl needs o be rescued it needs to be rescued. otherwise, it shouldn't be pet.



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16 Mar 2008, 12:30 pm

There is another reason why monkeys should not be pets. It is called B-virus and it is very, very serious. It is a form of herpes and if not treated immediately (like within 24 hours or LESS of exposure), it WILL kill you in a horrible way.

According to the book "The Coming Plague", there have been only 4 people in the world who have survived B-virus. I happen to know one of them. He is going to have to be on a cocktail of drugs for the rest of his life. And yes, it can be transmitted sexually, like HIV. The early symptoms mimic meningitis, in 99% of the cases by the time health care people realize what you actually have, it is too late. I do hope that child's doctor also thought to test her for B-virus; if not, and she has it, it is too late for her now. Unfortunately most doctors, let alone the general public, have never heard of B-virus.

I cringe every time I see a movie or a TV show that depicts monkeys and other non-human primates as being cute, harmless animals. THEY ARE NOT!! ! It is not uncommon for monkeys to have B-virus and not show any symptoms, so you cannot tell simply by looking at the monkey if it is sick or not.

The reason I know so much about B-virus is that the incident described in "The Coming Plague" happened where I work (the company name has since changed) and the account given is pretty much the way it happened. There was a young man who was either bitten or scratched by a monkey with the virus, and since at that time very few people were aware of B-virus, he did not report the injury. It was not until he was rushed to a local emergency room two weeks later with supposed meningitis that he or anyone around him realized that something out of the ordinary was going on. I was told by one of the emergency room nurses that he died, fully conscious, bleeding out of every orifice. (In that respect, it is like Ebola).

Since that time, nobody who works with non-human primates at my company is allowed to go near them without putting on full PPL (personal protective equipment), which means suiting up like an astronaut each and every time. The animals themselves are kept in a secure area and only certain people are allowed access to them. Furthermore, we are required to inform any health care personnel that we come in contact with that we do work with non-human primates and therefore are at risk of exposure. That is how serious this disease is.



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18 Mar 2008, 8:08 pm

ClosetAspy wrote:
There is another reason why monkeys should not be pets. It is called B-virus and it is very, very serious. It is a form of herpes and if not treated immediately (like within 24 hours or LESS of exposure), it WILL kill you in a horrible way.

According to the book "The Coming Plague", there have been only 4 people in the world who have survived B-virus. I happen to know one of them. He is going to have to be on a cocktail of drugs for the rest of his life. And yes, it can be transmitted sexually, like HIV. The early symptoms mimic meningitis, in 99% of the cases by the time health care people realize what you actually have, it is too late. I do hope that child's doctor also thought to test her for B-virus; if not, and she has it, it is too late for her now. Unfortunately most doctors, let alone the general public, have never heard of B-virus.

I cringe every time I see a movie or a TV show that depicts monkeys and other non-human primates as being cute, harmless animals. THEY ARE NOT!! ! It is not uncommon for monkeys to have B-virus and not show any symptoms, so you cannot tell simply by looking at the monkey if it is sick or not.

The reason I know so much about B-virus is that the incident described in "The Coming Plague" happened where I work (the company name has since changed) and the account given is pretty much the way it happened. There was a young man who was either bitten or scratched by a monkey with the virus, and since at that time very few people were aware of B-virus, he did not report the injury. It was not until he was rushed to a local emergency room two weeks later with supposed meningitis that he or anyone around him realized that something out of the ordinary was going on. I was told by one of the emergency room nurses that he died, fully conscious, bleeding out of every orifice. (In that respect, it is like Ebola).

Since that time, nobody who works with non-human primates at my company is allowed to go near them without putting on full PPL (personal protective equipment), which means suiting up like an astronaut each and every time. The animals themselves are kept in a secure area and only certain people are allowed access to them. Furthermore, we are required to inform any health care personnel that we come in contact with that we do work with non-human primates and therefore are at risk of exposure. That is how serious this disease is.

well thats disturbing...