New here, so many questions, so many answers

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Spacedoubt
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03 May 2008, 8:39 pm

Greetings. I actually came to this website a long time ago about me. (When I take the aspie quizez online, I score exceedingly high.) However, now I can see that my dd, who will be 11 next month, almost certainly is an aspie.

There are so many things that I don't know if I can list them all. She flaps her arms and rocks her body so much that she breaks my chairs. She doesn't know she's doing it. She is super sensitive in many ways, about what she eats and wears and how much time she can spend with people. She is compulsively organized about some things, and completely oblivious to order in other ways!

I just read the thread about a kid repeating lines from movies. That was her. She still does it, but now she uses big words, and I sometimes have to correst her. She picks up words from everywhere and asks me what the strangest things mean.

I don't want to keep listing stuuf. She is in a program to help her socialize with kids and get some counselling. I told her counselor and the directors that I think that she had AS. (They were saying that she doesn't always get along with the other kids and I was explianing that she just gets overstimulated and she needs alone time.) They said that maybe she has a pervasive developmental disorder.

I want answers, though.

Now that I am reading these threads, I am wondering about my other dd as well. She has been diagnosed with Oppositional defiance disorder and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (from watching her sister and me have epileptic seizures.). Maybe all of her problems are related to those.

Anyway, I'm glad to be here. I hope I can get help for my 10-yr-old if she needs it.



annie2
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03 May 2008, 9:10 pm

Welcome . . . and I hope you do find the answers you are looking for. We are all on a journey here - I don't think I'll ever get answers to all my questions, but I do find that the advice and info on here helps me in my quest to do the best for my AS son. You'll probably find the Parents forum handy.



annie2
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03 May 2008, 9:11 pm

annie2 wrote:
You'll probably find the Parents forum handy.


Oops! This is the Parent forum (thought I was in General) - sorry!



Spacedoubt
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03 May 2008, 9:20 pm

Thanks. As I read, I keep seeing things and thinking, "She does that! She does that!"

She has ticks, for example. And she stims like crazy. I just wish that I could get some aknowledgement from someone, from her doctors, so that she could get some help, or some understanding.

I wonder if this is something I should ask her neurologist about.



Spacedoubt
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03 May 2008, 9:22 pm

Also, after I learned about this, her best friend's mom discovered that my dd's best friend is almost certainly an aspie. She IS.

Isn't that interesting? Do birds of an aspie feather flock together?



Thomas1138
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03 May 2008, 9:46 pm

What's a dd?



Spacedoubt
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03 May 2008, 9:54 pm

Thomas1138 wrote:
What's a dd?


A darling/dear daughter.

In the epilepsy forums that I frequent dd=darling daughter, ds=darling son, dh=darling husband, dw=darling wife, mil=mother-in-law, etc. I guess I just thought those acronyms were universal.



aurea
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03 May 2008, 10:13 pm

Hi welcome to wrong planet. :D
Where are you from? I'm in Melbourne Australia.

My friends son has been dx'd with ODD, he is very similar to my 9 year old AS son. My son doesn't fly off the handle as often or quit like my friends son does though, I think this is possibly mostly because my house is much quieter ( my friend has 8 kids) I think its possible that he (friends son has undiagnosed sensory issues) On Friday friends son was rushed to hospital for a full blown seizure, the doctors took carefull note of his bad behaviour the previous day as its possible bad behaviou=pre seisure/seisure.
What I've learnt is that seisures and ASD's can go hand in hand, my own son has an appointment in June to see if he is having abscence seisures.

Ask all the questions you want. I would keep at the doctors until they do an assesment of your child even if it is only to shut you up. :wink: My son was origanaly dx'd with adhd, first pead wanted to medicate I didn't, thank goodness now.

Anyway ask all the questions you like.



Spacedoubt
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03 May 2008, 10:29 pm

Oh no, I hope your son doesn't have epilepsy. I am in California. Here in the USA, a good website is EFA. I know there are good resources in Australia, too.

It is possible that his friend's bad behavior was a sign of things to come. Epilepsy is so compicated.

A week ago tonight my daughter asked me how she would know if she was having a little seizure because she felt weird. I told her she might be. 20 minutes later we were walking home from a restaurant and she had a real doozie. So, it's so important for the person to trust their instincts.

Thanks for the welcome. :D I have had epilepsy for 34 years, so if you have any questions about that, feel free to ask.



Spacedoubt
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03 May 2008, 10:33 pm

aurea wrote:

I would keep at the doctors until they do an assesment of your child even if it is only to shut you up. :wink:


Our pediatrician is an idiot. Should I ask her neurologist?



aurea
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03 May 2008, 10:51 pm

I would ! !! !! ! I would ask anyone and everyone until a full assesment had been done.


We have a family history of epilepsy, my older sister had it, she hasn't hada seisure in years though.

My son mostly just does this weird thing where he will stare off and his eyes roll to one side and back, his legs go wobbly and he often falls into us or the ground or stumbles. This usually only happens I think when he is stressed or extremely tired. He has on occasion complained of feeling really scared for no reason just prior or de ja vu. He has also said things like he feels weird, or his head feels funny, his brain feels funny, he has complained of feeling sick and feeling funny without the eye roll thing. I havent noticed him do the eye roll, stumbling thing for a few weeks now. Does any of this sound like seisures?

When he was a baby he had a full blown convulsion which the doc's put down to another medical issue, but now I'm not so sure. Maybe a combination of both.

Sorry I've hijacked your post.



pakled
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04 May 2008, 12:15 am

thanks...I was afraid it was a bra size or something...;)

My ignorance of male aspies is only exceeded by my ignorance of female ones. It's a difficult age for every girl, no matter what's going on upstairs.

Just be a Dad to her. In a few years, you'll be having the problems that most of us Dads (or step-Dad, in my case..;) have. You've had a lot more experience with it, sounds like you're not doing too badly...



xyzyxx
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04 May 2008, 1:10 am

Spacedoubt wrote:
In the epilepsy forums that I frequent dd=darling daughter, ds=darling son, dh=darling husband, dw=darling wife, mil=mother-in-law, etc. I guess I just thought those acronyms were universal.
I've never seen them anywhere except here on WP.



rachel46
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04 May 2008, 7:01 am

Quote:
Spacedoubt wrote:
In the epilepsy forums that I frequent dd=darling daughter, ds=darling son, dh=darling husband, dw=darling wife, mil=mother-in-law, etc. I guess I just thought those acronyms were universal.
I've never seen them anywhere except here on WP.


I've been on many boards and they all use these abbreviations.

Welcome! My son is 11 and this board will give you a lot of answers and hope.



Spacedoubt
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04 May 2008, 2:06 pm

aurea wrote:
I would ! !! !! ! I would ask anyone and everyone until a full assesment had been done.


We have a family history of epilepsy, my older sister had it, she hasn't hada seisure in years though.

My son mostly just does this weird thing where he will stare off and his eyes roll to one side and back, his legs go wobbly and he often falls into us or the ground or stumbles. This usually only happens I think when he is stressed or extremely tired. He has on occasion complained of feeling really scared for no reason just prior or de ja vu. He has also said things like he feels weird, or his head feels funny, his brain feels funny, he has complained of feeling sick and feeling funny without the eye roll thing. I havent noticed him do the eye roll, stumbling thing for a few weeks now. Does any of this sound like seisures?

When he was a baby he had a full blown convulsion which the doc's put down to another medical issue, but now I'm not so sure. Maybe a combination of both.

Sorry I've hijacked your post.


Yeah. IANAD (I Am Not A Doctor), but all of that sounds like simple partial and complex partial seizures. I would definitely get him checked out. Being tired or stressed are two of the most common triggers of seizures.

Those actually sound like a lot of my seizures, and my daughter's. I have temporal lobe epilepsy. A simple partial seizure, also called an aura, involves just one part of the brain. That can be a funny feeling, deja vu, etc. A complex partial involves more than one part of the brain, but not the whole brain. That can involve a weird smell that's not there, an inability to speak and/or understand the spoken word, auditory hallucinations (I hear a Beatles' song), etc.

I think it's all fascinating.

That stuff sounds like seizures to me. There's a good chance that his seizures could be controlled with meds. You need to find out because otherwise, he won't be able to drive when he gets older.

OK, I'm done now. :)



bookwormde
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04 May 2008, 8:49 pm

It is defiantly time to find a clinician who is highly educated and experienced in aspersers/spectrum issues who has a major portion of his/her practice involving this.
PDD is a common misdiagnosis for girls because they are such good actresses and often mask the innate social skills deficit that is key to a spectrum diagnosis.

As you know stress can be a trigger for seizers so if there is a predisposition being on the spectrum can cause the situation to be more acute, particularly if the individual have gone undiagnosed and unsupported (clinically) past early childhood.

Both your children need to be evaluated by a competent clinician so they can get the proper supports.

It may not be possible to differentiate between stims and mild secures until you have gotten the spectrum stresses under control since they can both be triggered by stress.

bookwormde